Bill Radke | KUOW News and Information

Bill Radke

Host

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

A conceptual rending of what the Upstream Music Fest will look like.
Courtesy of Upstream Music Fest

Bill Radke speaks with Rock and Roll Hall of Fame DJ Marco Collins about the Upstream Music Festival. The three day festival in Pioneer Square is the brain child of Microsoft's Paul Allen. This is his way of bringing together local technology and local music. Collins is curating his own stage at the festival and shares some of the music he is excited for this weekend. 

Bill Radke talks with Roman Mars and Helen Zaltzman about the history of the term "sanctuary." Mars is the creator of the podcast 99% Invisible and Zaltzman is the creator of the language podcast The Allusionist. 

Bill Radke speaks with Tamara Stenman about the Kent School District's decision to halt a trip to Victoria, B.C. Stenman's daughter had planned to go on the trip but the school board canceled the international trip over concerns about border safety for undocumented students and issues with race and equity.

Radke also speaks with Kent School District spokesman Chris Loftis about why the school decided make this change.

Trump voters see progress, have high hopes

May 8, 2017

Bill Radke speaks with Peter Gigante and Katherine Green, two Trump voters who reflect on his first few months in office. Both Gigante and Green say that they are not 100 percent satisfied with President Trump so far, but see many accomplishments ignored by critics. They also make the case that Trump is aiming for a more moderate, bipartisan government. 

Bill Nye, here signing books in New York, says he loves you, Vashon, but you're wrong.
Photo by Scott Roth/Invision/AP

Bill Nye is back. Netflix is now streaming episodes of “Bill Nye Saves the World,” starring everyone’s favorite bowtie-clad scientist. (And of course, we’re still a bit nostalgic for those olden times when Nye traded in his signature tie for exercise shorts and a cape, all for Seattle’s amusement.)


'Week in Review' panel Chris Vance, Bill Radke, Erica C. Barnett and Knute Berger.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Two Washington state Republicans voted against President Trump's health care bill, one voted in favor and one has better things to do and skips it altogether.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray denies new allegations that he paid for sex.

US Congress
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Bill Radke talks to Margot Sanger-Katz, The New York Times reporter who covers health care for The Upshot, about the health care bill that passed the House and what happens next. 

Meredith Heuer

Bill Radke speaks with Daniel Handler, aka Lemony Snicket, and his wife Lisa Brown about their new book, "Goldfish Ghost." Handler wrote the story and Brown did the illustrations. And as you might guess from the title, it's a kid's story about a dead goldfish. Handler and Brown discuss the new book, why we don't really want happy endings, and the need for loneliness and bewilderment in our daily lives. 

FLICKR PHOTO/hackNY.org (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/bHLu96

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times reporter Mike Carter about the case of Roman Seleznev. Seleznev's story reads like spy fiction. He is the illegitimate son of a prominent Russian politician and Putin ally. He grew up in poverty, with an alcoholic mother who died when he was a teenager. Without a mother and abandoned by his powerful father, 17-year-old Seleznev ended up living on the streets.

Seleznev went on to steal and sell hundreds of millions of dollars' worth of credit card numbers, many from businesses here in Washington state. U.S. authorities pursued Seleznev around the globe and finally, they arrested him and brought him to Washington for trial.

He was just convicted and sentenced to 27 years in prison.

Will Seattle finally have an income tax?

May 2, 2017

On Monday the Seattle City Council unanimously passed a resolution to pursue an income tax on the richest households. This is the first step towards Seattle passing an ordinance that would impose a 1.5 percent tax on the incomes of those making over $250,000 a year.

Proponents say it could raise $125 million a year. But critics, including the Seattle Times Editorial Board said last week that this move hurts more than helps the city’s cause. 

KUOW host Bill Radke visits a gun range and learns how to shoot a sem-automatic weapon.
KUOW Photo/Shane Mehling

Bill Radke visits a gun range with journalist and gun advocate Dave Workman. Workman teaches Radke how to fire a semi-automatic weapon and explains why he supports second amendment rights. Workman also discusses why it's so important for him to carry a firearm. 

Drivers wait to cross Mercer Street
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke talks to Chris Long, the traffic engineering manager with the city of Bellevue, about adaptive traffic lights and how they can change the flow of traffic in busy areas. 

The protesters behind May Day

May 2, 2017

Bill Radke talks with reporter Liz Jones about the May Day protests. She describes the crowds, the increased tensions due to President Trump and what protestors hope to accomplish with their marching.  

People walk in the May Day labor march in Seattle on Friday, May 1, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Bill Radke talks to Eli Sanders, associate editor for the Stranger, about May Day protests — from the traditional immigrants' rights and workers' rights march that has taken place for the last 18 years to the more recent marches lead by anarchists.  

Sanders wrote about the antigovernment protesters and May Day last year in the Stranger.

Bill Radke talks with Bellevue City Council member Kevin Wallace about homelessness in Bellevue.

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