Bill Radke | KUOW News and Information

Bill Radke

Host

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

Ichiro Suzuki, special assistant to the chairman of the Seattle Mariners, donned a Bobby Valentine-style disguise and sneaked into the Seattle dugout to watch a bit of the action at Yankee Stadium.
AP Photo/Bill Kostroun

Ichiro Suzuki, the Carmen Sandiego of the Mariners, was spotted last week in the Seattle dugout serving a Super Mario Bros. inspired lewk. Fooling no one, the disguise raised more questions than it answered.


Flickr Photo/SP8254 (CC BY-NC-ND)

In light of this month’s finding in favor of the Colorado baker who refused to make a cake for a same-sex wedding, Supreme Court watchers anticipated a similar decision in the case of Arlene’s Flowers in Richland.

That expectation was dashed, as the court declined to rule on the case. Instead, they sent it back to the Washington State Supreme Court to reconsider.

The OUT@Comcast team members and friends marching in the 2017 Seattle Pride Parade, by Stephen Wong.
Flickr Photo/Comcast Washington State (CC BY 2.0)/https://bit.ly/2twwHdW

Bill Radke looks at the controversy over the restaurant that asked White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders to leave. We also talk about the commercialization of Seattle's Pride Parade. Should the event go back to its political roots?

Attorney General Jeff Sessions testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017, at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee.
AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Trump administration officials recently retreated on a policy to separate families at the border. Some have blamed past administrations for the stories of chaotic separations and traumatized children; others have pointed to Congress. And then one official claimed divine authority on the matter.


Rep. Derek Kilmer
United States Congress

Bill Radke talks to Congressman Derek Kilmer about the bills up for vote in the House this week, and the new bill introduced by Democrats to address the problem of separating migrant children from their families at the border. We also talk with Domenico Montanaro, NPR lead political editor, about the likelihood that any of these bills pass.

Boxed items are shown on conveyer belts leading to docks where they will be loaded onto trucks at an Amazon fulfillment center on Friday, November 3, 2017, in Kent.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Geekwire's Todd Bishop about three tech giants that have faced controversy over their contracts with law enforcement and government: Amazon, Microsoft, and Google.

Cartoonist Ellen Forney.
Photo by Jacob Peter Fennell.

When cartoonist Ellen Forney was diagnosed with bipolar disorder in the 90s, she knew she wanted to use her art to make sense of her new reality.

This resulted in a graphic memoir called "Marbles" that told the story of her experience and linked it to other creators. Her new book, "Rock Steady", offers advice gleaned from the lessons she's learned along the way.

L122, one of the newest members of the Southern Resident Community of orcas, spotted Sept. 7 near Sooke, British Columbia.
Dave Ellifrit/Center for Whale Research

Bill Radke talks with our panel about the declining number of orcas in Puget Sound and if we should stop whale watching. We also look at the New York Times investigation into pregnancy discrimination, and why the World Health Organization has added "gaming disorder" to its disease classifications.

Mike McGinn, Bill Radke, Joni Balter, and Rob McKenna at KUOW
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

This week, it was off with the head tax. The Seattle City Council voted to repeal the employee tax just weeks after unanimously voting to instate it. Meanwhile, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Washington state tribes, forcing the state government to replace hundreds more culverts to save the salmon. And we found out this week the federal prison at SeaTac Airport is currently holding more than 170 women seeking asylum.

Bill Radke makes sense of those stories and more of the week's news with Joni Balter, host of Civic Cocktail on the Seattle Channel, Mike McGinn, former mayor of Seattle, and Rob McKenna, former Washington state attorney general.

kid tantrum
Flickr Photo/WickedVT (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/QjpMNk

Bill Radke talks with author Katherine Reynolds Lewis about her new book, "The Good News About Bad Behavior: Why Kids Are Less Disciplined Than Ever — And What to Do About It."

The Seattle City Council brought the short-lived "head tax" into the world last month — and last Tuesday, the council proved that it could take it out too.

James Baldwin, in the documentary 'I Am Not Your Negro.'
DAN BUDNIK / MAGNOLIA PICTURES

Last week was the 50th anniversary of Robert F. Kennedy's assassination. Bobby Kennedy was remembered as a civil rights advocate, but it's more interesting than that. 

A soccer ball rests, waiting to be set in motion.
Flickr Photo/Marco Verch (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/J1SG48

Bill Radke talks to Roger Bennett, co-host of the NBC Sports show "Men In Blazers" about the rise of soccer's popularity in the U.S. and the 2018 World Cup without the U.S. Men's National team. 

Flickr Phoro NH53/(CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/oyQv1w

Did you know that Seattle has the second most places of worship per capita in the nation?

We are also the second most religiously unaffiliated city in America. Basically, Seattle has a lot of empty churches. And after June 24th, there will be one more empty church.

That will be the last day of service for the Capitol Hill Presbyterian church.

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Pacific University Professor Jeff Kuess, Reverend Eliana Maxim with the Seattle Presbytery, and Pastor Tyler Gorsline from A Seattle Church about Christian churches in Seattle and what their future looks like in the city. 

Head tax opponents and supporters crowd Seattle City Hall on Tuesday, June 12, 2018.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to two businesses that opposed the head tax about what solutions they're hoping to see, now that the head tax has been repealed. What do Seattle businesses need to do now? What's their responsibility?

Clara Berg, Dana Landon, and Andrew Hoge.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Here we are in balmy June-uary, still clad in waterproof — and arguably unstylish — garb. With our tendency to dress like a "hiking emergency" could break out at any moment (as one listener put it): Is Seattle a fashionable city?

Wellll... it depends on how you define fashionable, said our panel. But Seattle does have something special that's all its own. 

Caitlin Lee raises a Tax Amazon sign in front of Seattle City Council members on Monday, May 14, 2018, during a head tax vote at City Hall in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

The city of Seattle appears to be doing an about-face on the new employee head tax on businesses. The City Council approved the tax unanimously a month ago to generate money for affordable housing and homeless services.

Three generations of Garbes women: Angela, Josie, and baby Ligaya.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

When Seattle writer Angela Garbes first became a mom, she wrote a piece on breastfeeding that went viral. It remains the most-read article The Stranger has ever published. The hunger for knowledge behind that response was part of what fueled Garbes to write the new book "Like a Mother." She joined Bill Radke in the studio to discuss it, along with her mom Josie Garbes and three-month-old daughter Ligaya.

Anthony Bourdain during the Peabody interview for "Parts Unknown."
Flickr Photo/Peabody Awards (CC BY 2.0)/https://bit.ly/2sVduTd

Bill Radke remembers chef and TV host Anthony Bourdain with our panel, Andrea Otanez, journalist and lecturer in journalism and and communications at the University of Washington, and, Hsiao-Ching Chou, former food editor at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer and author of the cookbook, "Chinese Soul Food: A Friendly Guide For Homemade Dumplings, Stir Fries, Soups and More."

Colleen Echohawk-Hayashi and Gyasi Ross.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

You know the drainage pipes you sometimes see sticking out from underneath a road? They're called culverts. And they're creating a division between Washington tribes and state attorney general Bob Ferguson. The sovereign nations claim that Ferguson is failing to uphold their treaty rights; in response, he's escalated the lawsuit to the Supreme Court of the United States.


Facebook
Flickr Photo/Franco Bouly (CC BY ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/6rk2Qf

In November Eli Sanders, associate editor of the Seattle Stranger, walked into the local offices of Facebook and Google and hand delivered a letter requesting information on political ads targeting Washington residents. Washington State law requires that information to be made public. But Facebook and Google never disclosed how much campaigns were spending on political ads here locally.

Seatte police
KUOW / Ashley Ahearn

Bill Radke asked our panel what they want to see in Seattle's next police chief.

LMN Architects worked on the Seattle Central Library project.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

Bill Radke talks to our panel about the trademark fight over using the word 'cocky' in a romance novel title and the kickoff of pride month. We also ask, should the Seattle Public Library drop its overdue book fines for everyone? The library collected more than $1 million in overdue fees and fines in 2017. It currently offers a one-time amnesty, "Fresh Start" program for teens.

KUOW Photo/ Brie Ripley

This week the Week In Review crew took the ferry across Puget Sound to record the show in front of a live audience at the Bainbridge Island Museum of Art. We talked about the region's growing pains and whether Jeff Bezos' idea to colonize space is a good one or not (spoiler, the crowd thought not). Also, how effective will Starbuck's racial bias training be and what the end of Roseanne means?

Bill Radke talks to journalist Michael Pollan about his new book 'How to Change Your Mind,' a look into the world of research on psychedelics used to help patients deal with dying, addiction, anxiety, depression and more.

Homeless encampment along a road in the Sodo area of Seattle.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Bill Radke talks to Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan about the annual report out today showing a 4 percent increase in the number of homeless people in King County.

Arguably, these eyebrows are on fleek.
Public Domain

We all have those words. The ones you hesitate to say because you've only ever seen them written (which have a large overlap with the ones you realize you've been using wrong for your entire life). Where do you go to be enlightened? To the dictionary, of course.

Merriam-Webster editor-in-chief Peter Sokolowski says the data from those lookups can move words onto a list of ones to watch - a status recently achieved by "thirst trap." 

New biometric technology will match your face with your passport photo at airport customs. Is this a cause for celebration or concern?
Flickr Photo/Kat (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/6gTcVm

Assumptions about which passport line you belong in, the president's so-called Muslim ban, "random" screening that seems to target certain populations - airports are increasingly a frontier of ethnic and religious bias. Could we bypass some of those problems by taking the human element out of screening?

In the wake of outrage over the April arrest of two black men in a Philadelphia store, Starbucks has closed 8,000 US stores for racial bias training.
Flickr Photo/Iain Farrell (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/dVJijp

If you went in search of a mid-afternoon pick-me-up, you may have come up empty-handed. Across the nation, Starbucks stores closed for a 4 hour training session on racial bias. 


Carmen Best, interim police chief of Seattle
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke reviews the news of the weekend, including the controversy over the three finalists chosen for Seattle's next police chief. Interim Police Chief Carmen Best is not among them.

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