Bill Radke

Host

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of Julia Harrison

Bill Radke speaks with food anthropologist Julia Harrison about how Washington state became the king of apple production in America. 

An example of recent treasures hidden on Mercer Island.
Facebook Photo/Mercer Island Rocks!

Bill Radke talks with Richard Ronald about the game his family started playing on Mercer Island beaches: collecting and painting rocks and then hiding them for others to find

Courtesy of Madeline Whitehead

Bill Radke sits down with author Colson Whitehead to talk about his new novel, "The Underground Railroad."

His book explores slavery in the American South and the role of the Underground Railroad in that story. But in a departure from the history we know about the Underground Railroad, in his book the railroad is an actual railroad. 

Bill Radke speaks with Mark Hallenbeck, director of the Washington State Transportation Center, about when and how self-driving cars might be a part of everyday life in the Puget Sound.

KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

Bill Radke sits down with Seattle University professor Nancy Burkhalter to talk about her experience as an adjunct, or part-time professor, at the university.

More than half of all professors in the U.S. are adjuncts, and they receive far fewer benefits than their tenured or tenure-track colleagues who are essentially guaranteed employment for life. 

Last week, Seattle University adjunct professors voted to unionize, and a union is expected to be certified sometime next week.

Bill Radke sits down with KUOW education reporter Ann Dornfeld to talk about the state of Washington's charter schools. They’re growing in enrollment, but face a new legal challenge.

Gayle Nowicki of Gargoyles Statuary says growth is coming, so why fight it? She just hopes there will be a place in the future U-District for small, funky businesses like hers
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's Joshua McNichols about Seattle Mayor Ed Murray's plan to allow taller buildings in areas of the University District. 

Hillary Clinton speaking with supporters at a campaign rally at Carl Hayden High School in Phoenix, Arizona in March 2016.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/FpiUUf

Bill Radke speaks with Kristen Rowe-Finkbeiner, executive director of Mom's Rising and an advocate for paid sick and family leave, about the attention being placed on Hillary Clinton's illness. Rowe-Finkbeiner says Clinton is just a symptom of a bigger problem in American workplace culture. 

Lung cancer isn't just a smoker's disease

Sep 13, 2016
Lung cancer carries the stigma of being caused by a person's own actions, but many get lung cancer without ever having smoked.
Flickr Photo/Hannah Sorensson (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/o8CRgP

Bill Radke speaks with writer Janet Freeman-Daily, a lung cancer survivor, about the fact that lung cancer is not just a smoker's disease. Freeman-Daily says the association between lung cancer and smoking makes it harder for lung cancer researchers to get funding because it's seen as something people bring upon themselves. Freeman-Daily herself has never been a smoker. 

Gabe Galanda is an attorney specializing in Native American law
KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

Bill Radke sits down with Seattle-based lawyer Gabe Galanda to talk about the protests surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota. Galanda opposes the pipeline and joined the protests in North Dakota earlier this month.

He also helped draft a resolution in opposition to construction of the pipeline that was introduced at a Seattle City Council meeting Monday.

Carmen and Robert Patterson have lived in the Jungle, a homeless encampment in Seattle, on and off since 2011. They and several others who live in the Jungle shared photos, stories and text messages with us.
Courtesy of Robert Patterson

Thousands of people in Seattle won’t have shelter tonight.

The problem isn’t that Seattle isn’t spending enough, according to two national experts.


KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

UPDATE: Seahawks' wide receiver Doug Baldwin says the Seahawks will interlock arms at Sunday's game against the Miami Dolphins, which falls on the 15th anniversary of 9/11.  

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, the former NBA superstar and now cultural icon, made a public statement about inequality in 1968 when he boycotted the Olympics.

But decades later, Abdul-Jabbar doesn’t believe that NFL player Colin Kaepernick should refuse to stand for the national anthem.

Homeless families outside a shelter in downtown Seattle
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's Joshua McNichols about the city's plan to change the way it fights homelessness. A new report from national experts suggests it's time for Seattle to overhaul the service system.

How do you get to a hiking trailhead without a car?
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Weekly reporter Sara Bernard about her recent article looking at the dilemma many city dwellers face: How to access wilderness without a car? 

Bill Radke talks to Nina Cesare, University of Washington sociology doctoral student, about the study she co-authored with fellow doctoral student Jennifer Brandstad that explored the way people discuss death on Twitter and how that changes the conversation around death. 

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