Bill Radke | KUOW News and Information

Bill Radke

Host

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

Author Raj Patel said that, among other things, we don't pay enough for our food.
Flick Photo/Jo Ann Deasy (CC BY ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/7E5ZEP


Seattle (or Amazon-town, if you prefer) is ground zero for cheap things. Amazon has built a world-altering business out of discounting products online.

 

And author Raj Patel says that’s not a good thing.

Amazon.com logo
Flickr Photo/Guillermo Esteves (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks to Casey Coombs, reporter at the Puget Sound Business Journal, about Amazon's rapid growth over the last decade and what the company's playbook is for getting cities to offer incentives and deals to open fulfillment and data centers in their region. Coombs' reporting is a part of a series The Business Journals' have published called "The Amazon Effect: How taxpayers are funding the disruption of the U.S. economy."

Bill Radke speaks with Steven Agen, Seattle editor of Prost Amerika and host of the podcast Radio Cascadia, about the causes and fall out of the U.S. Men's National Soccer team failing to make it into the World Cup in Russia in 2018. 

Nathan Cultee dumps 16 farm-raised Atlantic salmon into a container on Tuesday, August 22, 2017, at Home Port Seafood in Bellingham.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Lynda Mapes, The Seattle Times environment reporter, about Washington's disappearing salmon population and what it says about the health of our coast and Puget Sound.  

Mount Rainier, or Tahoma, Tacobet, Ti'Swaq or Pooskaus.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

You need a to pack a lot more than a granola bar when you head out on a day hike.

 

Bill Radke talked with Taylor Brugh, vice president of Seattle Mountain Rescue, and Sandeep Nain, owner of the Redmond-based guiding company Miyar Adventures, about how to stay safe in the mountains — even if you’re just planning to be out for a few hours.

 

Angel statue in the Monumental Cemetery of Staglieno in Genoa, Italy.
Flickr Photo/Alexander Edward (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/atrV43

Let’s talk about death.

No, seriously. It’s time we all had a conversation with our loved ones about dying.

KUOW PHOTO/ Kara McDermott

This week one man killed 58 and wounded hundreds of people in Las Vegas using legal weapons — semiautomatic rifles modified with devises that make them act more like machine guns. Will this shooting change our gun laws? 

Frances Lee at the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

Frances Lee recently asked to be excommunicated from the church of social justice.

Lee, who is queer, trans and Chinese-American, was trying to point out the intolerance of the social justice movement. In an article that went viral earlier this year, they chose the headline “Excommunicate Me from the Church of Social Justice.”

Zoë Quinn at IndieCade in 2015.
Flickr Photo/IndieCade (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/EzDYuD

Zoë Quinn is an avid gamer, developer, and artist. In her capacity as author and advocate, she’s launched an online crisis network and spoken before the UN.

But you probably know her best from #GamerGate.

Guns line the walls of the firearms reference collection at the Washington Metropolitan Police Department headquarters in Washington, D.C.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

The mass shooting in Las Vegas has us asking – yet again – what we should do about gun violence.

The polarizing refrain “now is not the time to talk about gun control” comes up a lot in the wake of the attack. And Seattle Times columnist Danny Westneat said that’s code for “we’re not going to do anything.”

Author Celeste Ng at KUOW in October, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Celeste Ng’s sophomore novel, "Little Fires Everywhere," is set in her hometown of Shaker Heights, Ohio. But she sees more than a few commonalities between her town and ours.

“Seattle, like Shaker Heights, tries to live with its eyes on the world,” Ng said, speaking with Bill Radke on KUOW's The Record

Bill Radke talks to Chris Quintana, reporter for The Chronicle of Higher Education, about protests on college campuses like the ones at Evergreen State College that lead to the sanctioning of 80 students. 

Fernmarie Rodriguez at the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke speaks with Fernmarie Rodriguez about the impact of Hurricane Maria on her home island of Puerto Rico. Nearly two weeks after the hurricane hit the island, Rodriguez  still has not been able to speak with her mother.

She is helping to organize her co-workers at Microsoft to provide relief to Puerto Rico. Until she gets those efforts underway, she suggests people can help by donating to the Puerto Rico chapter of the Red Cross

KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Some NFL players took a knee or sat during the national anthem. The Seahawks stayed in their locker room. Other players stood and locked arms. What does it all matter if the fans tune them out?

Also, Facebook says it will get tougher on fake Russian campaign ads, but what is our responsibility to consume media smartly?

And Washington state sues the maker of OxyContin, but pharmaceutical companies say they don't deserve all the blame because it's doctors who over-prescribed and patients who over-used.

Oren Etzioni and Max Tegmark in the KUOW Green Room.
KUOW PHOTO/JASON PAGANO

Tesla CEO Elon Musk made headlines when he urged leaders to intervene in the quest for artificial intelligence, saying the technology “is a fundamental existential risk for human civilization.”

Musk painted a frightening picture of a future where an AI arms race could lead to apocalyptic outcomes for humanity. But KUOW’s Bill Radke recently talked with two AI experts who take a more optimistic view on the role intelligent machines can play in our future.

Oxycodone pills.
Flickr Photo/Be.Futureproof (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4xcHp9

Bill Radke speaks with author and journalist Sam Quinones about why Washington state and the city of Seattle have filed lawsuits against Purdue Pharma and other opioid producers. Attorney General Bob Ferguson said he's suing because Purdue lead a deceptive marketing campaign to promote their drugs and mislead doctors on the risk of pain killers.

KUOW PHOTO/ISOLDE RAFTERY

Bill Radke talks with Rabbi Daniel Weiner of Seattle's Temple De Hirsch Sinai about how to confront the recent flare-up of antisemitism in America.

FILE: Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell smiles as he leaves the chamber after announcing the release of the Republicans' health care bill Thursday, June 22, 2017.
AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Bill Radke talks to Mary Agnes Carey, senior correspondent covering health reform and federal health policy for Kaiser Health News, about how healthcare policy changes will affect patients. 

Health premiums for Washington state residents who buy into the state exchange can expect an average rise of 24 percent next year.

University of Washington campus at night.
Flickr Photo/Alireza Borhani (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/GgzJYf

Sexual assault has been “a scourge on American (college) campuses” for generations, according to Vanessa Grigoriadis, the author of "Blurred Lines: Rethinking Sex, Power, and Consent on Campus."

A scene from a simulation by the Washington State Department of Transportation of what could happen if a massive earthquake hits the Alaskan Way Viaduct.
YouTube/WSDOT

Seconds before last week's 7.1 magnitude earthquake in Mexico City, people got an alert that the ground was about to start shaking. The Sistema de Alerta Sismica Mexicano, or SASMEX, gives people a chance to get under a desk or leave a building before the shaking begins. 

A North Korean soldier looks at the southern side through a pair of binoculars at the border village of Panmunjom, north of Seoul, Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2003.
AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

Bill Radke, along with Livewire's Luke Burbank, speaks with author and journalist Blaine Harden about the recent war of words between President Donald Trump and North Korea leader Kim Jong Un. Harden explains why he doesn't believe North Korea actually wants start a war with America. 

Bill Radke talks with sportswriters Percy Allen and Michael-Shawn Dugar about the protests that rippled across the entire NFL schedule after President Trump said he'd love to see owners fire players for disrespecting the national anthem.

Doug Pray, director of the Grunge documentry Hype! (L) and Megan Jasper, CEO of Sub Pop Records
KUOW PHOTO/ Megan Farmer

The year was 1992. Nirvana and Pearl Jam were all over MTV, and everyone was sweating in flannel. Seattle’s grunge scene had ballooned into a global phenomenon.

So of course, The New York Times came calling.

L-R: Dave Ross, Bill Radke, Joni Balter, Rob McKenna
KUOW PHOTO/MEGAN FARMER

Bill apologizes to listeners for our interview with the man from this week's viral Seattle-Nazi-gets-punched video, and we look for the lessons. (see the video and read the transcript)

Seattle gets a new temporary mayor, and the race to replace Eastside Congressman Dave Reichert gets a well-known Republican challenger.

Bill Radke, host of the Record, reads an apology on air on Friday, Sept. 22.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

This week, we chose to air an interview I did with a man who got punched unconscious in downtown Seattle, while wearing a swastika armband.

He said he's not a Nazi. Many of you told me if you wear a swastika, you’re a Nazi. We’ll discuss that in a moment.

Courtesy of Darrell Smart

“I love hearing a lawyer embracing risk.”

Those affirmative words came from professional climbing guide Dallas Glass, speaking with climber Darrell Smart, whose day job is as a litigator.

KUOW PHOTOS/MEGAN FARMER

Bill Radke talks to Turina James who supports safe consumption sites and Corri Durrant who opposes them about how drug abuse has affected their lives and informed their position on King County's proposal to open two safe consumption sites.  

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

The rising cost of housing in America's most desirable "creative" cities troubles Richard Florida, urbanist thinker and author. In those cities, the cost of housing is affordable only to the creative class themselves. The rest of the working population — those in service industry or manufacturing — struggle to keep up with rising housing prices.

Florida says what's happening in Seattle, specifically, is surprising even to someone like him, "supposedly in the know."

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks with Thanh Tan and James Hong about the lasting impact of the Vietnam War on the children of Vietnamese refugees. Tan is host of KUOW's new podcast Second Wave. Hong is executive director of Seattle's Vietnamese Friendship Association.

In the latest episode of Second Wave, Tan interviews filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick about their new documentary "The Vietnam War."

KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

Bill Radke and Monica Guzman talk to newcomers about the things that surprised them when they moved to the Seattle area. Guzman is the co-founder of The Evergrey.

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