Bill Radke

Host

Year started with KUOW: 1985 – 1986, 1991 – 2004, 2012 

Bill hosts The Record and Week In Review. After starting with KUOW as a University of Washington student in 1985, Bill was KUOW's morning host in the '90s and the creator of past show, Rewind, a news-satire show heard on KUOW and nationwide on NPR. 

Bill moved away to Southern California to host American Public Media's Weekend America and Marketplace Morning Report and returned to KUOW in 2012.

Ways to Connect

Bill Radke speaks with Associated Press reporter Donna Blankinship about her story a large portion of schools in Washington state don't have the funding they need to be able to test for lead in the water. 

Bill Radke talks with music critics Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot about the pivotal year of 1991 and how Nirvana's album "Nevermind" made Seattle the musical epicenter of the country. DeRogatis and Kot are co-hosts of Sound Opinions, which airs Sundays at 10 p.m. on KUOW.

Tents lined up in the Jungle, which extends north and south under Seattle's Interstate 5 corridor.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Almost nobody provides outreach and services in the Jungle, the homeless encampment under Interstate 5. Most city-funded outreach workers won't go there because of safety concerns. 

But that's about to change. The city of Seattle is planning what they're calling an intense period of outreach in the Jungle. 

Courtesy of New York Times/Evan McGlinn

Bill Radke speaks with Kirk Johnson, Seattle bureau chief at The New York Times, about the families he met while reporting a story on Mary's Place Guest Rooms, a new shelter for homeless families in South Lake Union.

Graham Kerr on his show, 'The Galloping Gourmet.'
Screenshot from YouTube

Bill Radke talks with Graham Kerr about his book "Flash of Silver." Kerr is best known as host of The Galloping Gourmet, a TV cooking show that aired nationally in the late 1960s and early 70s.

Amy Goodman, host of Democracy Now!, addressing the Chicago Green Festival in 2010.
Chris Eaves/Wikimedia Commons CC by 2.0

Amy Goodman, host of Democracy Now! on activist power: 

Bernie Sanders did not start a movement; he tapped into a movement.

The Occupy movement, which never really ended, even though people thought that didn't amount to a hill of beans.

Oh, that's not true.

You say the 1 percent today. And the 99 percent. Everyone knows what you mean. They occupied the language. The word “occupy” was the most looked-up for use word of 2011.

(You change the language, you change the world.)

Housing in the Yesler Terrace area.
KUOW Photo/Dominic Black

Bill Radke speaks with Emily Parkhurst, managing editor of the Puget Sound Business Journal, about why developers like Paul Allen's Vulcan Real Estate are interested in developing Yesler Terrace, Seattle's oldest housing project, and how the Seattle Housing Authority is working to ensure current low-income tenants aren't displaced. The Puget Sound Business Journal recently featured the development.

'Week in Review' panel Zaki Hamid, Bill Radke, Pamela Banks and Bill Finkbeiner.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

A dramatic “no” vote on a Seattle basketball arena leads to a misogynistic backlash, how do we get anything done in this city? And can we have Husky cheerleaders without being all kinds of exclusive? What are Trump and Clinton nostalgic about – and how about you?

Top read: Yes, I live in the Jungle. And so do 400 other people

Bill Radke gets wistful about the week gone by with the Urban League’s Pamela Banks, Humanities Washington’s Zaki Hamid and former Washington Republican state Senate Majority Leader Bill Finkbeiner. 

Bill Radke talks with Washington Republican Chris Vance, who is running for U.S. Senate, about why he'll be writing in John Kasich instead of voting for his party's likely presidential nominee.

Singer Hollis Wong-Wear.
Courtesy of Hollis Wong-Wear

Bill Radke talks to Hollis Wong-Wear, lead singer of the R&B trio Flavr Blue, about why she believes music and art can be an agent of change. 

Will Vancouver continue to be a stand-in for Seattle in film and television.
Flickr Photo/Alex Costin (CC BY ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/rTJE31

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about the decision in British Columbia to reduce film and TV tax breaks. 

Jacobo Miguel Pinon Jr. plays the harmonica at his space in the Jungle, a homeless encampment that houses more than 400 people by some estimates.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW reporter Joshua McNichols about Seattle's homeless encampment known as the Jungle. They discuss what it's like in the Jungle and why we react to it the way we do. 

In this March 10, 2016, file photo, Republican presidential candidate Ohio Gov. John Kasich, right, speaks as Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, listens, during a Republican presidential debate.
AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File

Bill Radke speaks with Saul Gamoran, chair of Senator Ted Cruz's Washington state campaign, and former Attorney General Rob McKenna, Washington state co-chair for Governor John Kasich, about whether they'll unite behind Donald Trump's candidacy.

Bellevue High School fans cheer during the first half of the team's Class 3A high school football championship game against Eastside Catholic, Friday, Dec. 4, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

When you think high school, do you think math class? Or do you think about the Friday night lights, the pep rallies and the spirit days?

Let's face it, high school sports are big in this country. By placing such a big emphasis on sports, some schools are sending kids the wrong message, said Amanda Ripley, an education journalist and author.

Supports of Capitol Hill's Lambert House march in the 2008 Pride parade.
Flickr Photo/Angela Stefanski (CC BY NC2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/51aHcy

Bill Radke speaks with Alan Andrews-Katz about why he is helping the Lambert House stay on Capitol Hill. The house provides services and support to LGBTQ youth. For 25 years, the Lambert House has been located in a Victorian home on Capitol Hill. The owner is selling. Lambert House has until the end of the year to raise $2 million. 

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