Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for, and editing and producing stories for's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

A man suspected of killing a state trooper on Interstate 24 has died after he was shot by police in Kentucky. The suspect, Joseph Thomas Johnson-Shanks, 25, was shot after a brief manhunt, according to the Kentucky State Patrol.

It all began Sunday night, when Trooper Cameron Ponder, 31, pulled a car over on I-24. The suspect then drove off, setting off a car chase, police say. After a pursuit of some 10 miles, the chase ended, and Ponder was shot to death in his police car.

Updated 3:15 p.m. ET

An unusually fast-moving wildfire in Northern California's Lake and Napa counties has destroyed at least 400 homes since it started Saturday, officials say. The fire is 5 percent contained; it has injured four firefighters, and authorities are investigating reports of a civilian death.

Updated at 5 p.m. ET

The World No. 1 Serena Williams was upset by the unseeded Roberta Vinci of Italy 2-6, 6-4, 6-4, ending Williams' quest to win the first calendar Grand Slam since 1988.

Favored at 300-1 odds and having never lost a match to the 32-year-old Vinci, Williams seemed destined to move on to the U.S. Open final. When she won the first set 6-2 with relative ease, it looked all but guaranteed that she would find herself in the championship match.

John Richard Moore Jr., who starred in the Our Gang shorts of the 1930s that later became TV's The Little Rascals, has died just days short of his 90th birthday. Moore's busy career as a child actor included scores of films; in one, he shared a kiss with Shirley Temple.

The South Korean man who attacked U.S. Ambassador Mark Lippert in Seoul six months ago has been sentenced to 12 years in prison. Lippert, who had only recently taken the Korea post, received cuts to his face and hand but survived the attack by Kim Ki Jong.

The power-sharing deal that has allowed Catholic nationalists and Protestant unionists to run Northern Ireland since 1998 is in jeopardy, after leading ministers resigned in a political crisis that has deepened amid allegations that members of the Irish Republican Army may be linked to a murder.

First Minister Peter Robinson, the leader of the Democratic Unionist Party, resigned along with three other ministers from the party, leaving a sole DUP politician — Finance Minister Arlene Foster — in place. In a protective measure, Robinson named Foster the acting first minister.

Petra Laszlo, the videographer caught on camera sticking out her leg to trip a migrant as he ran from police while clutching a child to his chest, says she is sorry — and that she's not "heartless." Laszlo says she panicked when she saw people running toward her in a field close to Hungary's border with Serbia.

The airspace around Disneyland is restricted. That's the lesson learned by a company that was set to spray for mosquitoes in Orange County, Calif., Wednesday night — but had to call off the mission because it didn't have a waiver to fly near the theme park.

"A complication arose in the operation regarding permissions to fly over restricted airspace around Disneyland," the Orange County Mosquito and Vector Control District says. "The contractor was unable to secure the permission in time to conduct a full operation."

New images of the dwarf planet Ceres give fresh detail to its most intriguing features: a cluster of bright spots that NASA says "gleam with mystery" and are intensely different from anything else on Ceres' surface.

Taken from fewer than 1,000 miles away, the images may finally help NASA figure out what's behind the brightness.

Chris Henkey, the pilot who's being called a hero for his fast and calm handling of a potentially disastrous situation, is due to retire next week after 42 years in the cockpit.

Houses were washed away and people raced to high ground in central Japan on Thursday after a major river burst through a levee overwhelmed by torrential rains. The Kinugawa River's banks collapsed around midday, flooding a residential neighborhood.

Nearby areas also sustained severe flooding and mudslides; the government has urged 130,000 people to evacuate the area.

Instead of welcoming some 53,000 students to the start of the school year, teachers in Seattle are marching in picket lines Wednesday, going on strike over issues that range from pay to testing.

From member station KUOW, Ann Dornfeld reports for our Newscast unit:

"The district said it was offering the teachers a generous pay raise, but teachers said they deserve more, after waiting through the great recession for higher pay.

In a $725 million deal, the 127-year-old National Geographic magazine is leaving behind its nonprofit status and becoming a key piece of a new venture between its parent organization and 21st Century Fox.

The dramatic shift will place the venerable magazine, with its iconic yellow-rimmed covers, under a new venture called National Geographic Partners. Fox will own 73 percent of the new company, with the National Geographic Society owning 27 percent.

Quiksilver, the clothing company that has sold surfing gear since 1969, is seeking relief from its creditors under Chapter 11 of the U.S. bankruptcy code. The filing is for the company's American division; it comes on the day Quiksilver had been scheduled to discuss its third-quarter financial results.

The maker of sporting apparel and gear postponed that conference call, instead announcing that it had entered into a plan to reduce its debt by more than $500 million.

After a widely watched video showed one of its journalists tripping a man carrying a young boy as they attempted to run past police in Hungary, the TV network N1TV has fired the camerawoman.