Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a blogger and producer who works with NPR's Morning Edition and Digital Media group. In addition to coordinating Web features, he frequently contributes to NPR's blogs, from The Two Way and All Tech Considered to The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to leading the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell trains both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between departments. Other shows he has worked with include All Things Considered, Fresh Air, and Talk of the Nation.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, as well as editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division. He also worked at the network's video and research library.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

From 2002-2003, Chappell served as editor-in-chief of The Trans-Atlantic Journal, a business and lifestyle monthly geared for expatriate Europeans working and living in the United States.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Get ready for some early sunsets. At 2 a.m. Sunday morning, U.S. clocks moved one hour backward, officially ending Daylight Saving Time. Folks in Hawaii and much of Arizona can ignore the fuss — they never moved their clocks forward, back in the spring.

The time-switch can also serve as a reminder to check batteries in smoke detectors and fire alarms, as many fire departments advise. And if you ride a bike or walk on streets after dusk, it's a good time to be sure you're visible to drivers.

Nina Pham, the nurse who became the first person to contract the deadly Ebola virus on American soil, was reunited with her dog in Dallas Saturday, after the Cavalier King Charles spaniel was declared not to have the disease and released from his three-week quarantine.

The reunion with the dog, who's just shy of 2 years old, came eight days after Pham was found to be free of Ebola and released from a special facility at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland.

A cute-a-bration has broken out among Hello Kitty fans, as the beloved Japanese character marks its 40th year. Since introducing Hello Kitty in 1974, the Sanrio company has turned simple design and a knack for accessorizing into $8 billion worth of annual sales.

The milestone inspired a Hello Kitty Con in Los Angeles and a large run in Singapore. But the largest fete was in Tokyo, where Sanrio put on a parade and other events.

An electrical link that supplies Bangladesh's power grid with electricity from India failed Saturday, plunging most of the country into a blackout. Attempts to restore power met only with limited success before officials finally made a breakthrough late Saturday.

Most of the country's population of more than 160 million people went without electricity for more than 8 hours.

Update at 3:30 p.m. ET: Power Returns To Many

A court in Cairo sentenced eight men to three years in prison today, over charges of "debauchery" stemming from an online video that showed the men celebrating what appeared to be a same-sex wedding in August.

Nigerian extremist group Boko Haram says the more than 200 girls it kidnapped from a school in April are now married. The group made the claim as its leader denied stories that it has reached a cease fire deal.

"We have married them off. They are in their marital homes," Boko Haram leader Abubakar Shekau said of the girls, in a video that was obtained by Agence France-Presse.

From Lagos, NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reports:

Alta Bicycle Share, the company that manages bike-sharing programs in New York, Washington, Chicago, San Francisco and other cities, has been sold to an investment group that includes executives in fitness club operator Equinox and real estate firm Related Companies. The new owners say they'll expand the service in New York, where customers now take more than 1 million trips a month on Citi Bike.

When a branch of Punjab National Bank in northern India opened for business Monday, the staff was surprised to find it had been robbed, the strongroom breached from underground by thieves who had dug a tunnel from an empty building some 125 feet away. They had plundered about a quarter of the room's 360 secure lockers before making their getaway.

Australia's immigration agency has ceased processing new visa applications from Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone, over concerns about the possible spread of the deadly Ebola virus. The country has also shut down an aid program in West Africa, Australia's immigration chief says. The move is drawing criticism.

In the latest tweak to America's plan to prevent the spread of the deadly Ebola disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leader Dr. Tom Frieden announced changes to the U.S. response to Ebola and the guidance federal agencies are giving to state and local governments.

One week after Apple's new mobile payment system, Apple Pay, debuted in CVS stores, CVS has backtracked and barred its use. Rite Aid took the same step, leading many observers to note that the two companies are part of a group of retailers that's developing its own payment system, called CurrentC. Partners include Wal-Mart, Best Buy and 7-Eleven.

Chiquita Brands International, the banana and produce firm whose trademark blue stickers have been ubiquitous in American kitchens for decades, is being sold to two Brazilian companies in a deal valued at around $1.3 billion. The Charlotte-based company traces its roots to the 1870s, when American entrepreneurs brought bananas to U.S. consumers from the Caribbean.

A new class of musicians was inducted to the Country Music Hall of Fame Sunday night, with blind singer and pianist Ronnie Milsap leading the group. Milsap's career ranged from playing both early R&B and on the Elvis hit "Kentucky Rain" in the 1960s to the heights of solo success in the '70s and '80s. One of his biggest hits was 1980's "Smoky Mountain Rain."

Kaci Hickox, the nurse who spent the weekend in mandatory quarantine after arriving in New Jersey from West Africa, will be discharged from the hospital and allowed to leave the state, officials said today, citing tests that have shown she's been free of any Ebola symptoms for the past 24 hours.

The move could allow Hickox, a Texas native, to travel to Maine, where she currently lives.

In case any over-exhausted parents might wonder if they're hallucinating, we can assure you: Former Reading Rainbow host LeVar Burton did actually give a reading of the 2011 best-seller Go the [bleep] to Sleep this weekend.

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