Bill Chappell | KUOW News and Information

Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Kellyanne Conway, counselor to the president, is under fire after making the false claim that Bowling Green, Ky., was the scene of a massacre carried out by Iraqis. Conway made the claim in an MSNBC interview that aired Thursday night, in which she argued in favor of President Trump's immigration and refugee ban.

A machete-wielding man shouted "Allahu Akbar" and attacked a security patrol near the Louvre Museum on Friday, prompting a soldier to shoot the man, wounding him, the head of Paris police says.

The attack was "obviously of a terrorist nature," French Prime Minister Bernard Cazeneuve says, according to France 24.

State Rep. Beth Fukumoto is exploring a possible switch from the Republican to the Democratic Party in Hawaii, after her stance against President Trump prompted her colleagues to vote her out as their minority leader, a post she had held since her election in 2012.

Fukumoto said her fellow Republicans ousted her "because she participated in the women's march protesting the Trump presidency," reports Wayne Yoshioka of member station Hawaii Public Radio.

A large crowd turned out to see Punxsutawney Phil on Groundhog Day Thursday, waiting to learn whether the animal saw his own shadow on Gobbler's Knob. Phil was in an unusually feisty mood, but once he settled down, he saw his own shadow, officials deemed.

Ruffling U.S. ties with one of its closest allies, President Trump is sharply criticizing an Obama-era agreement with Australia — a deal that also reportedly prompted the American leader to tell Australia's prime minister that his was the "worst" phone call Trump received after his inauguration.

Late Wednesday night, the president vented his anger on Twitter, saying: "Do you believe it? The Obama Administration agreed to take thousands of illegal immigrants from Australia. Why? I will study this dumb deal!"

Stressing the importance of America's Muslim allies in the fight against Islamic extremism, retired Gen. David Petraeus says it's important for the U.S. to avoid portraying the conflict as "a clash of civilizations." His comments came in a House Armed Services Committee hearing titled "The State of the World: National Security Threats and Challenges."

Days after fire destroyed the Victoria Islamic Center in Victoria, Texas, donations to rebuild the mosque have passed $1 million. And that's only one part of the support the mosque has received: Four churches and a synagogue say Muslims are welcome to hold services in their buildings.

In the second large consumer settlement related to its diesel emissions scandal, Volkswagen says it will pay around $1.2 billion to help people who bought its vehicles with the larger 3.0-liter diesel engine. The plan includes a buyback as well as a repair program.

Officials in a number of states have spoken out against President Trump's recent executive actions on immigration. On Monday, Washington state became the first to file a lawsuit against the administration, seeking a restraining order to stop enforcement of the ban.

"If successful it would have the effect of invalidating the president's unlawful action nationwide," Attorney General Bob Ferguson said of the lawsuit, according to member station KNKX.

Recent high school graduates in Tennessee are already allowed to attend community college at no cost. Now Gov. Bill Haslam is looking to expand the year-old program to provide free community college educations to adults, as well.

Haslam, a Republican who has been in office since 2011, made his pitch at Monday night's State of the State address. Afterward, he tweeted, "Let's be the Tennessee we can be."

An executive order protecting gays and lesbians who work for federal contractors "will remain intact" at President Trump's direction, the White House says. The move could allay concerns that Trump might end recently adopted protections against an anti-LGBTQ workplace.

The White House announced the move in a relatively short statement early Tuesday, saying that the president "is determined to protect the rights of all Americans, including the LGBTQ community."

It was an executive order in 1942 that created the system forcing Americans of Japanese descent to live in internment camps.

Days after President Trump used an executive order to dramatically shift U.S. immigration policy, Fred Korematsu Day is attracting special attention — including as the subject of a Google Doodle.

Korematsu fought a discriminatory federal program all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court — and lost. Years later, he was awarded America's highest civilian honor.

Surprise and a desire for retaliation are some of the reactions to President Trump's temporary ban on travelers from seven Muslim-majority countries.

Russia's President Vladimir Putin will congratulate President Trump on his election, in what the Kremlin says is the first phone call between the two since Trump was inaugurated last weekend. The call is slated for Saturday evening Moscow time — which is eight hours ahead of U.S. Eastern.

In other phone calls on Saturday, Trump will speak with France's President François Hollande and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer says.

Rafael Nadal has reached the final of the Australian Open, where he will face longtime rival Roger Federer in a matchup that answers the prayers of tennis fans eager to see a ninth Grand Slam final between the pair. Nadal outlasted Grigor Dimitrov in a nearly five-hour match Friday.

"For me, it's a privilege" to face Federer again, Nadal said after his semifinal.

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