Anna Boiko-Weyrauch | KUOW News and Information

Anna Boiko-Weyrauch

Staying cool in the International Fountain at Seattle Center is one way to beat the heat.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

If you don’t have air conditioning like most of Seattle, what’s the best way to cool your home? 

The Seattle dog, with grilled onions and cream cheese, was born in Pioneer Square in the late 1980s. This is a Polaroid of that era.
Courtesy of Hadley Long

Mara Dillinger stood at a hot dog cart in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood, eating her fourth hot dog of the night.

A stroller was used to hold up a sign during the Solidarity Day protest outside of the Federal Detention Center in SeaTac.
Daniel Berman for KUOW

Question: “I’m a new mom to a six-month-old baby, and hearing how desperately these women missed their children, and vice versa, made me feel heartbroken and ashamed of our country,” listener Kari Blankenship wrote.  

She and other KUOW listeners have been asking what they can do to help locally detained parents. 

KUOW listener Audrey Farmer was curious about why escalators on her commute seem to break down so often.
KUOW Photo/Anna Boiko-Weyrauch

If it feels to you like certain light rail escalators tend to break down often, you’re not wrong. Some escalators break so frequently, in fact, that Sound Transit is paying more than half of what it originally spent on those escalators in order to fix them.


A big earthquake could hit Seattle in the next 50 years. That got KUOW listener Derek Hanson wondering: What would happen to our most prominent landmark?


Workers pour concrete for a floor of an office tower in Renton. Pouring concrete carries a lot of risk for workers.
KUOW Photo/Anna Boiko-Weyrauch

Around Seattle, you might think more workers are getting hurt given that construction is booming.


The newly constructed Arbora Court Apartments, with 133 units, is shown on Monday, April 23, 2018, in Seattle. Forty of the apartments have been set aside for families transitioning out of homelessness.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Three years ago, the city told developers: You can either pay into a fund or build affordable housing units yourselves.

Listener Andrew Chinnici heard about that on KUOW and wanted to know: How is it working out?

Well, Andrew, so far there are permits for just 19 units through this fund.

Henry lives in Belltown, where he likes to cuddle, go for walks, and poop.
KUOW Photo/Anna Boiko-Weyrauch

Everybody poops, especially your pooch.

Seattle pets generate over 80,000 pounds of poop a day, according to Seattle Public Utilities. That’s 40 poop tons — the weight of a fire truck.

Washington is the top cherry producing state in the country.
Flickr Photo/beautifulcataya (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/6KiQQK

New tariffs on exports to China could have a big impact on Washington state. Tariffs went into effect Monday on 128 American products, including fruit, pork and metal pipes, in retaliation for proposed U.S. tariffs on Chinese steel and aluminum.


The state first made a plan to add carpool lanes in Tacoma in 1993.
Flickr Photo/Greg Nissen https://flic.kr/p/7L519V(CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Forget the aroma of Tacoma. Traffic on the freeway there STINKS.

“It feels like it has never not been a construction zone,” one listener told us.

Landslide retention walls being constructed along tracks near Mukilteo in 2015.
Courtesy of Washington State Department of Transportation

After a lot of rain, you might be used to hearing us say something like this on the air: “Amtrak has canceled passenger train service from Seattle to Everett for the next two days …”

Landslides on railroad tracks along Puget Sound frequently delay trains. That made KUOW listener April Isenhower curious: Why were train tracks between Seattle and Everett built in areas prone to mudslides?

Audrey Behrenhoff walks her dog Emma in front of her home in Redmond last week, at Friendly Village-55 Plus Park, recently purchased by King County Housing Authority. Behrenhoff, 80, has lived in three different mobile homes at Friendly Village.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Underneath the Sea-Tac airport flight path, where planes rip through the sky, there’s a giant field of dirt, and it has a lot to say.

“Please be advised that your tenancy of the above premises will terminate…” reads a large sign posted at the corner of the field. 

Pot products are seen inside The Green Door marijuana shop on Rainier Avenue South in Seattle on Thursday, Jan. 4, 2018.
KUOW photo/Anna Boiko-Weyrauch

On a busy stretch of Rainier Avenue South in Seattle, next to a taco truck, a dry cleaners and a gas station is The Green Door. A large road-side sign touts it as “Seattle’s favorite cannabis shop.”

Inside on Thursday, it was tense. “Very nerve-wracking,” said manager Mark Larsson. 


Documentary filmmaker Christopher Rufo doesn't make enough money to have to pay Seattle's new high-earners tax, but he still wants to keep Seattle income-tax-free. So much so, he joined around 30 plaintiffs suing the city.

Sign for Navos' Ruth Dykeman Children's Center in Burien, Wash.
KUOW Photo/Anna Boiko-Weyrauch

South King County principal Melissa Pointer is worried about her student.

"I tried so many times not to cry,” she said, her voice breaking. “Because when I think about the fact that there's literally 15 days for him and he doesn't know where he’s going to go, that just breaks my heart."


Eunice Lake from Tolmie Peak in Rainier National Park, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Next summer fees may increase at the 17 seventeen busiest national parks, including Olympic National Park and Mount Rainier.

The Park Service is asking for public comments on a new proposal that would nearly triple some entrance fees.

Sound Transit's light rail shot from the SeaTac Airport Station.
Flickr Photo/Michael @NW Lens (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9P9hnJ

Republicans in the Washington State Senate say Sound Transit misled them two years ago, and that they have a report to prove it.

Democrats are crying foul, saying that's not true.

File photo of airline food.
Flickr Photo/Steven Tan (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/b4dwix

Seattle workers at Sky Chefs, an airline catering company, are still waiting for money owed to them in back wages.

The workers protested this week, saying Sky Chefs backtracked on some fines leveled against the company. And the city of Seattle, they say, hasn’t helped.

The current Convention Place bus station is being considered as an expansion site for the Washington State Convention Center.
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

Seattle will get an additional $60 million in public benefits, including affordable housing and bike lanes, as part of the proposed expansion of the Washington State Convention Center.

That’s more than the project’s developers had originally offered. The new money is the result of long negotiations.

A homeless encampment in Seattle's Rainier Valley, taken March 2016.
KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

Seattle City Council members are considering a tax on big business to fund services for homelessness.

This kind of tax is often known as a “head tax” or “employee hours tax.” And it’s actually nothing new for Seattle. The city had something like it for transportation funding, until it was repealed in 2009.

For Charlie Underdown, 11, letting girls into Boy Scouts is actually a very Boy Scout thing to do.

At a pizza restaurant in Seattle reads aloud from his scout handbook: "A Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind...." Charlie takes the Scout Law to mean you shouldn't exclude anybody.

"They literally have these pledges and the oath to be kind and courteous and considerate," he says. So he's one Scout who supports the announcement from Boy Scouts of America that girls would be allowed to join starting in 2019.

Seattle Design Commission

Groundbreaking for a new mega-project in Downtown Seattle is slipping further back. The expansion of the Washington State Convention Center is now months behind schedule.

Developers still need two big things: money and land.

Businesswoman Mary Keller Wynn came up with the Natte Latte coffee stand in 1999, which launched the Pacific Northwest's propensity for sexy espresso stands.
Courtesy of Mary Keller Wynn

Are bikini baristas a Pacific Northwest phenomenon?

Jake Koukel from Puyallup asked KUOW’s Local Wonder team to investigate.

Marci Carpenter, who is blind, advises Seattle on transit issues. As the convention center expands, she expects her commute time to increase.
KUOW Photo/Anna Boiko-Weyrauch

Route 150 pulls up to the University Street station in the downtown Seattle transit tunnel. On board, passenger Marci Carpenter listens for her stop.

A worker pulls a wagon past a "his and hers" garden theme set at the Northwest Flower & Garden Show Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2013, in Seattle.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Is Seattle's convention center really running out of space?


Newlyweds Shannon and Eric Joehl sit down to a dinner of shrimp tacos as they discuss utilities for the house they just bought on Beacon Hill.
Anna Boiko Weyrauch for KUOW

At an Airbnb apartment in Seattle, newlyweds Shannon and Eric Joehl sit down to a dinner of shrimp tacos as they discuss utilities for the house they just bought on Beacon Hill.

Mitch, a worker for a marijuana farm in Skagit Valley in 2013. The farm doesn’t exist anymore.
Daniel Berman

We followed the money trail from one bag of weed. 


FLICKR PHOTO/HEATHER (CC BY 2.0)/HTTPS://FLIC.KR/P/3HVNXD

As bad as the traffic was on Monday, the propane truck rollover on I-5 could have been catastrophic.

Tanker trucks are basically giant movable bombs. So says Mark Hallenbeck, director of the Washington State Transportation Center, a think tank at the University of Washington.

FLICKR PHOTO/KING COUNTY, WA(CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/dYNq26

Seattle beaches at Discovery Park and Golden Gardens are still closed following a malfunction at a sewage treatment plant near Discovery Park. That problem caused 310 million gallons of untreated stormwater mixed with sewage to be diverted into Puget Sound.

As of Monday, the plant was running at half-capacity, and was not dumping untreated waste. But that didn’t keep visitors away this holiday weekend. People in hooded rain jackets walked dogs, strolled the wooded paths and misty shores. Enjoying themselves, even if their noses said otherwise.

FLICKR PHOTO/SEATTLE CITY COUNCIL (CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0))/https://flic.kr/p/JuwbM8

Almost 16 years after the 9/11 attacks, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray is scheduled to give the annual State of the City address on Tuesday at Seattle’s Idris Mosque, a house of worship that was at the center of what was then a new wave of Islamophobia.

On September 13, 2001, a man armed with a gun and a tank of gasoline targeted the mosque near Northgate Mall.

Aziz Junejo, the son of one of the mosque’s founders, tells us in his own words about that incident and what it meant for the entire community.


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