Andy Hurst | KUOW News and Information

Andy Hurst

Producer, The Record

Year started with KUOW: 2006

Andy Hurst has worked in public radio for more than a decade. He's a producer for KUOW's midday newsmagazine, The Record. He's also worked as a producer for both Weekday and The Conversation.

Andy spent more than six years behind the microphone at KUOW. His voice could be heard just about everywhere on the KUOW schedule. He first joined the station as an announcer for KUOW2.

He started his career at Northwest Public Radio in Pullman, Wash., where he was a producer and the local host for Weekend Edition.

In his spare time, Andy likes digging through record crates, going to shows, watching documentaries, and watching baseball. 

He's a graduate of the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University.

Ways to Connect

Found photo of an Indiana family.
Flickr Photo/Brent (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8mjHW2

Jeannie Yandel talks with author Stephanie Coontz about her updated and revised book, "The Way We Never Were: American Families And The Nostalgia Trap." Coontz teaches history and family studies at Evergreen State College in Olympia.

A frequent sight in our newsroom: Business reporter Carolyn Adolph arguing with Siri, the iPhone personal assistant.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Jeannie Yandel talks with Geekwire's Monica Nickelsburg about why virtual assistants like Siri typically have female sounding voices.

Bellevue running back Isaiah Gilchrist, left, leaps to avoid a tackle attempt by Eastside Catholic's Noah Failauga during the first half of the Class 3A high school football championship Friday, Dec. 4, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Bill Radke talks with investigator and former federal prosecutor Carl Blackstone and Bellevue Wolverines Booster Club president John Connors about the recent investigation into Bellevue High School's football program.

Bill Radke talks with (Tacoma) News Tribune reporter Debbie Cafazzo about the presence of lead in the drinking water at six schools in the Tacoma School District. Radke also talks with Tacoma resident Elizabeth Rudge. Her home is one of 1,700 that may have lead in the water supply.

Washington state auditor Troy Kelley arrives at the federal courthouse in Tacoma, Wash., for a hearing Monday, May 11, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Bill Radke talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the federal trial of State Auditor Troy Kelley. He's charged with 15 counts, including fraud, tax evasion and money laundering.

'Week in Review' panel Joni Balter, Michael Maddux, Kim Malcolm and John Carlson.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Amazon is donating a building a temporary homeless shelter in Seattle. What role should the business community play in solving homelessness? Also, the troubled Western State Hospital has a new CEO. Will that help solve it's problems? And, should Washington ditch the sales tax in favor of an income tax?

Kim Malcolm chats over the news of the week with Seattle Channel's Joni Balter, KVI's John Carlson and Michael Maddux, chair of the King County Young Democrats.

The main entrance of Western State Hospital in Lakewood, Wash.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Kim Malcolm talks with state Rep. Laurie Jinkins (D-Tacoma) about the problems facing Western State Hospital and why she believes adding staff and raising pay is a big part of the solution.

'Week in Review" panel Paul Guppy, Bill Radke, Maud Daudon and Sydney Brownstone.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Advertising is coming to an outdoors near you, can commercialism save our state parks? Also, should Seattle give heroin users a safe place to inject? And, should we give over a Sodo street for a basketball arena?

Bill Radke runs the the fast break with The Stranger’s Sydney Brownstone, Washington Policy Center’s Paul Guppy and Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce CEO Maud Daudon.

In this Jan. 26, 2015, file photo, Scott Smith, a supporter of open carry gun laws, wears a pistol as he prepares for a rally in support of open carry gun laws at the Capitol, in Austin, Texas.
AP Photo/Eric Gay, File

Bill Radke talks with Spokane blogger Jim Ryan about why he started a satirical online petition to allow people to openly carry firearms at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland this July.

Officials confirmed this brown bat found in King County, Washington, contracted white-nose-syndrome.
Courtesy of Progressive Animal Welfare Society

Jeannie Yandel talks with Earthfix reporter Jes Burns about a deadly fungus called white nose syndrome that's killed millions of bats on the East coast. In March, a single bat with white nose syndrome was discovered in Washington state. Burns talks about what the spread of this syndrome could do to the state's ecosystem and agriculture. 

Light rail runs on the surface in Seattle's Rainier Valley.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke talks with King County Councilmember Claudia Balducci about the draft plan for Sound Transit 3, which would expand light rail in the Puget Sound region.

Radke also talks with Jonathan Hopkins, political director for Seattle Subway, a nonprofit that advocates expanding mass transit in Seattle.

Pattie Bastian, left, and cold case detective Lindsey Wade. Bastian's daughter's rape and murder in 1986 was never solved. Wade believes testing old rape kits could help lead to the killer.
Archive handouts

On August 4, 1986, 13-year-old Jennifer Bastian went for a bike ride through Point Defiance Park in Tacoma.

Several weeks later, her body was found in the park. She had been raped and murdered.

Detectives have DNA evidence from Bastian's killer, but 30 years later they still don't know who he is.

UW junior #13 Katie Collier, center, was diagnosed and treated for leukemia in 2011 and is now cancer free.
UW Husky Photo

Jeannie Yandel talks with former UW basketball player Elise Woodward about the women's team reaching the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Basketball Tournament. Woodward is a broadcaster with the Washington IMG Sports Network and the Pac-12 Network.

Andy Hurst talks with volunteers at Bernie Sanders' campaign office in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood. We also hear from Hillary Clinton volunteers at a phone-banking event in Seattle's Mt. Baker neighborhood.

An SDOT Crew puts the finishing touches on a bus-only lane on Battery Street in Seattle's Belltown Neighborhood.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke talks with Janette Sadik-Khan about her new book "Streetfight: Handbook for an Urban Revolution." Sadik-Khan was New York City's Transportation Commissioner from 2007 to 2013.

Faces of commuters who passed through University of Washington and Capitol Hill stations Monday morning.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke talks with KUOW's Joshua McNichols about the opening of new light rail stations on Capitol Hill and near the University of Washington. Radke also talks with Zach Shaner, staff reporter for the Seattle Transit Blog.

Marny Lombard has this advice on preventing suicide: "Reach out. Connect. Encourage your children to connect. That is how we thrive. If you see loneliness, reach out to it. Wrap your arms around the lonely. Maybe figuratively, maybe actually.”
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Audio Pending...

Marny Lombard lost her only child to suicide. Samuel Henderson Lombard was 22.

Lombard told Bill Radke how that loss led her to become an advocate for suicide prevention. Lombard is an organizer with Zero Suicide: Inland Northwest and a volunteer with Forefront at the University of Washington.

Bill Radke talks with Crosscut commentator Knute Berger about why he thinks Lieutenant Governor should be eliminated as an elected position in Washington state government. We also hear from state Sen. Cyrus Habib, who's running for the position. 

Federal appeals court judge Merrick Garland walks with President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden from the Oval Office to the Rose Garden to be introduced as Obama’s nominee for the Supreme Court at the White House, Wed., March 16, 2016.
AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Audio Pending...

The big news of the day is President Obama's nomination of Judge Merrick Garland to the U.S. Supreme Court. Bill Radke talks about the nomination with Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal, Washington U.S. Senate candidate Chris Vance and current Washington U.S. Senator Patty Murray.

Steve O'Connor in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Bill Radke talks with Steve O'Connor about why he's calling on the Seattle Archdiocese to expand it's list of known child abusers. O'Connor was sexually abused by a teacher named Dan Adamson in the early 1960s at St. Benedict Catholic school in Wallingford. Adamson wasn't on the Seattle Archdiocese's list. 

A naming rights agreement with Safeco Insurance and the Seattle Mariner's baseball field ends after the 2018 season.
Flickr Photo/Matthew Simantov (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e7xWtf

Bill Radke talks with Seattle Times reporter Geoff Baker about recent developments in Chris Hansen's arena proposal in the Sodo neighborhood. Hansen is asking the city to give up two blocks of Occidental Avenue South in order to move forward with his arena plan.

Homeless RV
Flickr Photo/A. Kwanten (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/Bv6MSo

Bill Radke talks with Eric Stoll, co-president of the Ballard Chamber of Commerce, about why he thinks there's a link between an increase in homelessness and crime in Ballard. Radke also talks with Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien, who represents the Ballard neighborhood.

AP Photo/Manuel Valdes

Bill Radke talks with privacy advocate Jared Friend about a bill in the state legislature that would restrict public access to police body camera footage. Friend is director of technology and liberty at the ACLU of Washington. We also hear from state Rep. Drew Hansen, who is backing the bill.

Michael J. Cody
BishopAccountability.org

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle Times reporter Lewis Kamb about his story profiling Rev. Michael Cody, a priest who worked in Western Washington for 21 years and sexually abused children.

Radke also speaks with attorney Michael Pfau about secret files kept by the Catholic Church on abusive priests. 

Bill Radke talks with Danni Askini about why she's running for an open seat in the 43rd legislative district of the Washington state House of Representatives. Askini is currently the executive director of the Gender Justice League.

Bill Hobson, former executive director of the Downtown Emergency Services Center in Seattle, is interviewed Thursday, April 5, 2007.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Bill Radke talks with Seattle City Councilmember Tim Burgess about the impact of Bill Hobson on Seattle. Hobson was the former executive director of Seattle's Downtown Emergency Service Center. He died Friday at the age of 76.

Also: Listen to an archived interview between Hobson and KUOW's Marcie Sillman, originally aired last summer, at the time of Hobson's retirement from the DESC.

Open Books, Seattle's only poetry-only bookstore.
Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/aw6Tyc

Bill Radke talks with former Washington state poet laureate Elizabeth Austin about Open Books, a poetry-only bookstore in Seattle. The owners of Open Books are looking to sell the store to a new owner.

Jimmy Hung in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Andy Hurst

Three teenage brothers have been charged in the January shooting at the homeless encampment known as the Jungle in which two people were killed and three wounded.

The two older boys, aged 16 and 17, were charged as adults per Washington state law.

Screenshot of Nextdoor homepage

Bill Radke talks with journalist Erica C. Barnett about the city of Seattle's partnership with social media site Nextdoor. Barnett's Nextdoor account was temporarily suspended after she publicly posted comments from Nextdoor users during an online town hall with Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole.

Seattle Police Department patch.
Facebook Photo/Seattle Police Officers Guild

Seattle police come into contact with about 27 people every day who are experiencing a mental health crisis, including mental illness, dementia or drug-related issues.

Sgt. Dan Nelson is in charge of coordinating the Seattle Police Department’s Crisis Intervention Program, which acts as a bridge between the criminal justice system and social services.

Pages