Andy Hurst | KUOW News and Information

Andy Hurst

Producer, The Record

Year started with KUOW: 2006

Andy Hurst has worked in public radio for more than a decade. He's a producer for KUOW's midday newsmagazine, The Record. He's also worked as a producer for both Weekday and The Conversation.

Andy spent more than six years behind the microphone at KUOW. His voice could be heard just about everywhere on the KUOW schedule. He first joined the station as an announcer for KUOW2.

He started his career at Northwest Public Radio in Pullman, Wash., where he was a producer and the local host for Weekend Edition.

In his spare time, Andy likes digging through record crates, going to shows, watching documentaries, and watching baseball. 

He's a graduate of the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University.

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Flickr Photo/Keith Allison

Marcie Sillman interviews Rick Barnhart, the high school baseball coach of Jon Lester at Bellarmine Prep in Tacoma, about what it's like to see his former player compete in the World Series. Lester is a starting pitcher for the Boston Red Sox and will capture the World Series title tonight if Boston beats the St. Louis Cardinals.

The inside of the elevators at Amazon headquarters in Seattle. People who work at Amazon refer to themselves as Amazonians.
Flickr File Photo/cheukiecfu CC BY-NC-ND: http://bit.ly/1MUXs0y

There was big news from our region’s tech giants this week: Microsoft's profits are up nearly 17 percent over the past year, and Amazon now has more than 110,000 employees — passing Microsoft for the first time ever.

Nick Wingfield covers technology for The New York Times. He talks with Marcie Sillman about the latest tech news coming out of Seattle.

Flickr Photo/Angelo Carosio

When you fill out your ballot in the coming days, you should know that the people you elect to the Seattle City Council might just stay there for a long time.

That’s because Seattle City Council incumbents rarely lose. In fact, only five incumbents have lost in the last 20 years. And three of those were elected in the wake of a 2003 scandal in which strip club operators illegally gave campaign money to council members.

Flickr Photo/Michael J (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Washington state is facing a crisis when it comes to providing beds for psychiatric care. On a per capita basis, according to a 2009 national report, Washington ranks at the very bottom.

When beds are unavailable at psychiatric hospitals and regional mental health providers, hospital emergency rooms are often a last resort. Mental health advocates say this is a huge problem, because in some cases, mentally ill people are housed in emergency rooms for months, without access to sufficient treatment.

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Beginning next year, as many as 21 marijuana retail stores could be open for business in Seattle — and that's sparked a contentious debate over where these stores can be located.

State rules mandate that retail stores must be 1,000 feet from schools, public parks, libraries and even transit centers. That leaves very few places for pot stores to open. According to the city's preliminary map, in nearly all of central Seattle (including Capitol Hill, First Hill and the Central Area), there are very few places that pot retailers will be able to open up. One of those places is the corner of 23rd Avenue and E Union Street.

AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

"When the American people find out how their government has secretly interpreted the Patriot Act, they are going to be stunned, and they are going to be angry," said Oregon Senator Ron Wyden on the Senate floor in May, 2011. He was referencing the National Security Agency’s secret surveillance program.

This hour on The Conversation we’re taking a long, strange trip through Seattle’s musical history. We’ll start before rock 'n roll was invented; when Seattle had a vibrant, professional music scene, thanks in part to powerful unions. We’ll learn about Jimi Hendrix’s early days when he got by as a backup guitarist for the likes of Little Richard. Also, author Charles R. Cross tells us how Ann and Nancy Wilson from the Seattle band, Heart, went from middle-class Bellevue teenagers to international stars.

AP Photo/Luis Romero

Every person between the ages of 15 and 65, regardless of risk factors, should get routinely tested for HIV. That’s the recommendation from the US Preventative Services Task Force, an independent panel of doctors and researchers.

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