Andy Hurst | KUOW News and Information

Andy Hurst

Producer, The Record

Year started with KUOW: 2006

Andy Hurst has worked in public radio for more than a decade. He's a producer for KUOW's midday newsmagazine, The Record. He's also worked as a producer for both Weekday and The Conversation.

Andy spent more than six years behind the microphone at KUOW. His voice could be heard just about everywhere on the KUOW schedule. He first joined the station as an announcer for KUOW2.

He started his career at Northwest Public Radio in Pullman, Wash., where he was a producer and the local host for Weekend Edition.

In his spare time, Andy likes digging through record crates, going to shows, watching documentaries, and watching baseball. 

He's a graduate of the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University.

Ways to Connect

Amy Wales, daughter of Thomas Wales speaks at a news conference on February 21, 2018 in Seattle
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Kim Malcolm talks with David Payne and Jody Gottlieb about the unsolved murder of Federal Prosecutor Thomas Wales. In 2001, Wales was shot to death in his Queen Anne home. Payne and Gottlieb are former CNN journalists and creators of the podcast Somebody Somewhere.

A photo posted on the Facebook page  of Bellevue's Low Price Guns store.
Facebook Photo/Low Price Guns

Kim Malcolm talks with Jason Cazes, owner of Low Price Guns in Bellevue, about why he's decided to not sell long guns, which include military-style assault weapons, to people under the age of 21. 

ballot drop box ballot box
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Kim Malcolm talks with Washington Secretary of State Kim Wyman about the safeguards in place to prevent cyber attacks on Washington's election systems. In 2016, Russian hackers targeted Washington's voter registration system, but were unsuccessful.

This interview was inspired by a listener question. If you want to know something about the news in this region, just ask us.

Students walk in front of Gerberding Hall on Thursday, November 16, 2017, on the University of Washington campus in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Kim Malcolm talks with University of Washington associate professor Jennifer Stuber about suicide prevention on college campuses. Last week, the Washington state Senate passed a bill that would fund suicide prevention programs at colleges across the state.

Stuber is faculty director for Forefront Suicide Prevention at the UW.

Flickr Photo/Brian Stalter (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Kim Malcolm talks with Alison Holcomb about Seattle's move to vacate convictions for misdemeanor marijuana possession. Holcomb is director of strategy for the ACLU of Washington and the architect of Initiative 502, which legalized recreational marijuana in Washington.

Flickr Photo/Emory Maiden (CC-BY-NC-2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/avtfVU

Kim Malcolm talks with Northshore School District Superintendent Dr. Michelle Reid about her district's new approach to assessing students for giftedness. In January, the district implemented a universal screening process for its Highly Capable program.

Presidential candidate Donald Trump, pictured here 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e41ELr

Kim Malcolm talks with University of Washington law professors Lisa Manheim and Kathryn Watts about their new book, "The Limits of Presidential Power: A Citizen's Guide to the Law."

Flickr Photo/torbakhopper (CC-BY-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/nHEVtP

Kim Malcolm talks with University of Washington researcher Caleb Banta-Green about why methamphetamine use is on the rise in Washington state.

Seattle Mariners former designated hitter Edgar Martinez speaks at a news conference announcing the retirement by the team of his jersey number 11, Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017, in Seattle.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Kim Malcolm talks with Seattle Times columnist Larry Stone about whether Edgar Martinez is likely to be voted into Major League Baseball's Hall of Fame. Martinez played his entire 18-year career with the Seattle Mariners, retiring in 2004.

Seattle City Hall
Flickr Photo/Daniel X. O'Neil (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1OGMTuh

Kim Malcolm talks with Crosscut reporter David Kroman about his investigation into the work culture at the city of Seattle's Human Resources department.

Flickr Photo/Tony Swartz (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Kim Malcolm talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the outcome of public records lawsuit against the Washington Legislature.

Parade-goers carry a blow-up planet Earth while marching in the Fremont Solstice Parade.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

OK, you’re a climate warrior: You take the bus, downtown or to California. You eat vegan.

But do you have to be so insufferable about it?

Some people don’t have all of the options that you do.

Pramila Jayapal
Flickr Photo/Joe Mabel (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/zznt82

Kim Malcolm talks with Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal (D-Seattle) about why she won't attend President Trump's State of the Union address on January 30.

Housing costs contribute dramatically to the high basic cost of living in Seattle.
KUOW photo/Megan Farmer

Rents have been declining in the Seattle area. Compared with the previous quarter, rents in December dropped an average of $50.

Smoke from an approaching wildfire looms over a home near Twisp, Wash., Aug. 19, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Kim Malcolm talks with Dr. Philip Mote about how climate change is changing Washington state. Mote is director of the Oregon Climate Change Research Institute. Previously, he was the Washington State Climatologist.

Flickr Photo/Tony Swartz (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/a48XR

Kim Malcolm speaks with Senator Andy Billig (D - Spokane) about what Democrats hope to accomplish during the 2018 legislative session. Billig is deputy majority leader of the Washington State Senate. 

Stephen Voss/NPR

Kim Malcolm talks with All Things Considered host Robert Siegel, who's retiring from the program on Friday. Siegel began his career at NPR in 1976 as a newscaster. Siegel has hosted All Things Considered since 1987.

Flickr Photo/furtwangl (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/65WoW5

The parent company of Value Village has filed a federal lawsuit against Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson regarding whether the thrift store should be required to tell customers how much of its sales actually go to charities. Associated Press reporter Gene Johnson discussed the case with KUOW's Kim Malcolm.

Kristin Leong, creator of the Roll Call Project and Christina Joo, junior at International School in Bellevue
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Bill Radke talks with Kristin Leong and Christina Joo about finding common ground between students and teachers.

Leong is a former middle school teacher and founder of the Roll Call Project, which asks students and teachers to think about what they have in common, and why it matters. Joo is a junior at International School in Bellevue, and a participant in the project.

Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/aiu7zy

Kim Malcolm talks with University of Washington nursing professor Josephine Ensign about the Doorway Project, the UW's effort to address youth homelessness.

The long-term goal of the project is to open a navigation center and hub in the University District that caters to homeless young people. Ensign is coordinator of the project.

Pramila Jayapal
Flickr Photo/Joe Mabel (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/zznt82

Kim Malcolm talks with Rep. Pramila Jayapal about why she believes Sen. Al Franken should step down from Congress. On Tuesday, Jayapal also called for Rep. John Conyers to resign. Both men face multiple allegations of sexual misconduct.

Flickr Photo/Andrew Malone (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/4unt5o

Every healthcare worker in Washington is required to undergo suicide prevention training. That includes nurses, dentists and even chiropractors. Now, University of Washington researchers have developed an interactive, online training program called All Patients Safe.

Adhering to Seattle's climate action plan would require reducing tailpipe exhaust 15 times faster than the 0.5 percent a year Seattle has actually achieved.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Kim Malcolm talks with Lisa Van Cise about the heavy traffic that drivers can expect over Thanksgiving weekend. Van Cise is a spokesperson for the Washington State Department of Transportation.

Courtesy of Lily Loofbourow

Bill Radke talks with Lili Loofbourow, culture critic for The Week about The Myth of the Male Bumbler.

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

When playwright Andrew Russell moved to Seattle in 2009, his mother came to visit. It was her first trip to the Pacific Northwest.

She told him something that he hasn’t forgotten: “Seattle is a great place to keep a secret.”

Flickr Photo/ Scott Beale/Laughing Squid (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/ https://flic.kr/p/c3y5to

Jeannie Yandel talks to comedian and writer John Hodgman about mansplaining, white culture and his book, "Vacationland: True Stories from Painful Beaches." Also: how the universe is not organized around Seattle.

A box containing an order from Amazon.com is shown after it was delivered to a house in Etters, Pa, Wednesday, Sept 16, 2005.
AP Photo/John Zeedick

Bill Radke talks with Washington Post opinion columnist Christine Emba about Amazon Key, a new delivery service from Amazon that drops off packages inside customer's homes.

Emba's latest column in titled "Amazon Key is Silicon Valley at its most out of touch."

Flickr Photo/Aaron Brethorst (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/wZ2bfe

Here in Seattle, we're innovators in tech, business, medicine, music and art. KUOW is exploring why Seattle is a magnet for people with big dreams. At a recent Seattle Public Library event called Invent Together, we asked people why Seattle is a hub for innovation. 

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks with Mark Hallenbeck about a pay-by-mile approach to funding roads and bridges in Washington. The state is rolling out a pilot program in January where drivers would pay taxes on the miles they drive, instead of the gas they purchase.

Journalist David Neiwert
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

In the late 1970’s, David Neiwert was just getting his journalism career started. He worked at a small daily newspaper in Sand Point, Idaho, about 20 miles outside the Aryan Nations compound.

He had to figure out how the paper was going to cover the hate group.

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