Andy Hurst

Producer, The Record

Year started with KUOW: 2006

Andy Hurst has worked in public radio for more than a decade. He's a producer for KUOW's midday newsmagazine, The Record. He's also worked as a producer for both Weekday and The Conversation.

Andy spent more than six years behind the microphone at KUOW. His voice could be heard just about everywhere on the KUOW schedule. He first joined the station as an announcer for KUOW2.

He started his career at Northwest Public Radio in Pullman, Wash., where he was a producer and the local host for Weekend Edition.

In his spare time, Andy likes digging through record crates, going to shows, watching documentaries, and watching baseball. 

He's a graduate of the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University.

Ways to Connect

Bellevue running back Isaiah Gilchrist, left, leaps to avoid a tackle attempt by Eastside Catholic's Noah Failauga during the first half of the Class 3A high school football championship Friday, Dec. 4, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Bill Radke talks with investigator and former federal prosecutor Carl Blackstone and Bellevue Wolverines Booster Club president John Connors about the recent investigation into Bellevue High School's football program.

Bill Radke talks with (Tacoma) News Tribune reporter Debbie Cafazzo about the presence of lead in the drinking water at six schools in the Tacoma School District. Radke also talks with Tacoma resident Elizabeth Rudge. Her home is one of 1,700 that may have lead in the water supply.

Washington state auditor Troy Kelley arrives at the federal courthouse in Tacoma, Wash., for a hearing Monday, May 11, 2015.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Bill Radke talks with Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the federal trial of State Auditor Troy Kelley. He's charged with 15 counts, including fraud, tax evasion and money laundering.

'Week in Review' panel Joni Balter, Michael Maddux, Kim Malcolm and John Carlson.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Amazon is donating a building a temporary homeless shelter in Seattle. What role should the business community play in solving homelessness? Also, the troubled Western State Hospital has a new CEO. Will that help solve it's problems? And, should Washington ditch the sales tax in favor of an income tax?

Kim Malcolm chats over the news of the week with Seattle Channel's Joni Balter, KVI's John Carlson and Michael Maddux, chair of the King County Young Democrats.

The main entrance of Western State Hospital in Lakewood, Wash.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Kim Malcolm talks with state Rep. Laurie Jinkins (D-Tacoma) about the problems facing Western State Hospital and why she believes adding staff and raising pay is a big part of the solution.

'Week in Review" panel Paul Guppy, Bill Radke, Maud Daudon and Sydney Brownstone.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Advertising is coming to an outdoors near you, can commercialism save our state parks? Also, should Seattle give heroin users a safe place to inject? And, should we give over a Sodo street for a basketball arena?

Bill Radke runs the the fast break with The Stranger’s Sydney Brownstone, Washington Policy Center’s Paul Guppy and Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce CEO Maud Daudon.

In this Jan. 26, 2015, file photo, Scott Smith, a supporter of open carry gun laws, wears a pistol as he prepares for a rally in support of open carry gun laws at the Capitol, in Austin, Texas.
AP Photo/Eric Gay, File

Bill Radke talks with Spokane blogger Jim Ryan about why he started a satirical online petition to allow people to openly carry firearms at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland this July.

Officials confirmed this brown bat found in King County, Washington, contracted white-nose-syndrome.
Courtesy of Progressive Animal Welfare Society

Jeannie Yandel talks with Earthfix reporter Jes Burns about a deadly fungus called white nose syndrome that's killed millions of bats on the East coast. In March, a single bat with white nose syndrome was discovered in Washington state. Burns talks about what the spread of this syndrome could do to the state's ecosystem and agriculture. 

Light rail runs on the surface in Seattle's Rainier Valley.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke talks with King County Councilmember Claudia Balducci about the draft plan for Sound Transit 3, which would expand light rail in the Puget Sound region.

Radke also talks with Jonathan Hopkins, political director for Seattle Subway, a nonprofit that advocates expanding mass transit in Seattle.

Pattie Bastian, left, and cold case detective Lindsey Wade. Bastian's daughter's rape and murder in 1986 was never solved. Wade believes testing old rape kits could help lead to the killer.
Archive handouts

On August 4, 1986, 13-year-old Jennifer Bastian went for a bike ride through Point Defiance Park in Tacoma.

Several weeks later, her body was found in the park. She had been raped and murdered.

Detectives have DNA evidence from Bastian's killer, but 30 years later they still don't know who he is.

UW junior #13 Katie Collier, center, was diagnosed and treated for leukemia in 2011 and is now cancer free.
UW Husky Photo

Jeannie Yandel talks with former UW basketball player Elise Woodward about the women's team reaching the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Basketball Tournament. Woodward is a broadcaster with the Washington IMG Sports Network and the Pac-12 Network.

Andy Hurst talks with volunteers at Bernie Sanders' campaign office in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood. We also hear from Hillary Clinton volunteers at a phone-banking event in Seattle's Mt. Baker neighborhood.

An SDOT Crew puts the finishing touches on a bus-only lane on Battery Street in Seattle's Belltown Neighborhood.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke talks with Janette Sadik-Khan about her new book "Streetfight: Handbook for an Urban Revolution." Sadik-Khan was New York City's Transportation Commissioner from 2007 to 2013.

Faces of commuters who passed through University of Washington and Capitol Hill stations Monday morning.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke talks with KUOW's Joshua McNichols about the opening of new light rail stations on Capitol Hill and near the University of Washington. Radke also talks with Zach Shaner, staff reporter for the Seattle Transit Blog.

Marny Lombard has this advice on preventing suicide: "Reach out. Connect. Encourage your children to connect. That is how we thrive. If you see loneliness, reach out to it. Wrap your arms around the lonely. Maybe figuratively, maybe actually.”
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Marny Lombard lost her only child to suicide. Samuel Henderson Lombard was 22.

Lombard told Bill Radke how that loss led her to become an advocate for suicide prevention. Lombard is an organizer with Zero Suicide: Inland Northwest and a volunteer with Forefront at the University of Washington.

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