Amy Radil | KUOW News and Information

Amy Radil

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2005

Amy Radil joined KUOW as a reporter covering politics and government in 2005. She got her start in radio as a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio from 1997 to 2000. She then freelanced for four years from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, contributing primarily to two public radio programs, The World and Marketplace. Amy graduated from Williams College in 1994 and received an M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in 1997.

Ways to Connect

Students put flowers on a memorial for the shooting victims at Marysville-Pilchuck High School in October 2014.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The father of the shooter at Marysville-Pilchuck High School is scheduled to go on trial in a Seattle federal court next week.

Raymond Fryberg, Jr. faces charges of unlawful firearms possession. But his lawyers say any mention of how his gun was used would prejudice the jury.

Cinerama preview of "Racing Extinction" raised money for Initiative 1401.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

University of Washington biologist Sam Wasser got a discouraging phone call last September.

“I got a call from our Fish and Wildlife agents on the border,” Wasser said. They said, “‘Sam, I am so frustrated because last week one ton of shark fins came through our port and I had to let it go.’”

Ben Perez works behind the counter at the new Dockside SODO marijuana retail store.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Washington could get lots more pot stores.

State regulators will allow medical marijuana providers to seek retail licenses later this fall. There are no strict limits on how many new licenses could be granted, and there is no requirement that they focus on medical patients.

The most-funded item on Seattle’s November ballot isn’t a candidate. It’s a ballot measure called Honest Elections, and almost all its funding comes from a few East Coast donors.

Under the Honest Elections plan, every voter would be a donor. Before a city election, voters would receive four $25 vouchers in the mail. Voters pick their favorite candidates and mail in their vouchers.

Photos of the students shot at Marysville-Pilchuck High School are seen in a memorial last year.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

  • The aunt of a teenage girl who dated the Marysville-Pilchuck High School shooter says releasing her text messages could inflame the community and haunt her for the rest of her life. 
  • The Everett Herald KUOW and other media organizations have filed briefs advocating for the texts to be made public.
  • Her request is expected to be heard in Snohomish County Superior Court on Thursday. 

Advocates for a teenage girl caught up in the investigation of last year’s shootings at Marysville-Pilchuck High School say releasing her personal text messages from that time would re-traumatize her and potentially subject her to threats and reprisals.

The girl did not attend the high school but was the former girlfriend of Jaylen Fryberg and friends with his victims.

Art in the halls at Marysville-Pilchuck High School following the mass shooting last October.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

As students at Marysville-Pilchuck High School head back to class, the devastating shooting last fall will return to headlines.

A report scheduled to be released Monday is said to contain horrific details from hundreds of students who were in the cafeteria that day.

People apply for jobs at Coca-Cola at a jobs fair hosted by the Congressional Black Caucus in Miami, Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011.
AP Photo/Lynne Sladky

Blacks – especially black women – working in the public sector were disproportionately laid off during the recession, according to a new study by the University of Washington.

The study is being presented this week at a conference of the American Sociological Association. It found that white workers appear to have been better protected from financial shocks to government budgets.

The ACLU placed a full-page ad in the Seattle TImes.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Friday's Seattle Times newspaper contains a full-page ad from the American Civil Liberties Union. It’s an open letter to Amazon employees, offering to help sue the company if they believe their rights have been violated.  

Operagoers visit replica of horse stall where Japanese-American families were housed en route to camps.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Opera patrons tend to glide toward their seats, downing last drops of Prosecco before the doors close.

But this Seattle opera wants to draw you in from the moment you step into the grand hall. Case in point: Patrons entering the McCaw Hall lobby pass through a checkpoint where actors dressed as guards assign numbers.

“This is your family number,” they tell you, “please keep it with you at all times.”

Chris Cody at Herban Legends in White Center, the mostly unincorporated neighborhood just south of Seattle. The medical marijuana business recently received a letter from King County telling it to close.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

In the medical marijuana business, Seattle has determined that there are good guys and bad guys.

Seattle and King County recently sent letters to all medical marijuana businesses, warning them they need to close. Seattle sent two kinds of letters: one to “good guys” who have a good shot at getting a state license, and another to “bad guys” who probably won’t.

King County took a harder line, telling all the dispensaries in unincorporated areas to close.

City Councilmember Jean Godden at Bulldog News in the University District.
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

After 12 years on the Seattle City Council, Jean Godden conceded defeat Thursday in her race for a fourth term.

Rob Johnson (center in light shirt and tie) and campaign supporters watch election results Tuesday night at The Pub at Third Place. Johnson was leading in District 4, ahead of Michael Maddux and incumbent Jean Godden.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Your votes are in and here's what we know about the primary election for Seattle's new City Council districts: It was pretty good for incumbents.

Except one. 

Take us somewhere special. 

That’s what we asked the 47 candidates running for the new City Council districts in Seattle.

King County primary ballot.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Those who supported dividing Seattle into districts said it would encourage grassroots campaigning and decrease the need for big donations.

With districts, they said, "a grassroots candidate can win against an incumbent using good old-fashioned legwork and people power." They said the old system favored candidates with deeper pockets.

John Syverson, facilities manager for the Frye Hotel downtown, doesn't sugar coat the problems around his buildings.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

The Frye Hotel in downtown Seattle evokes a certain nostalgia. Two towering brick buildings are connected by an awning where one imagines a white-gloved doorman standing.

But outside, facilities manager John Syverson doesn’t hide the less charming problems with the building.

Christopher Monfort is escorted into the courtroom on the first day of his trial for murdering SPD Officer Timothy Brenton, along with other charges, on Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Christopher Monfort should spend the rest of his life in prison without parole for the ambush slaying of a Seattle police officer, a King County Superior Court jury decided Thursday.

The iconic sculpture in McCaw Hall, home of the Pacific Northwest Ballet and Seattle Opera.
Flickr Photo/Frank Fujimoto (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Tourists have spent more time and money in King County than expected in recent years. Now officials say those tourist taxes will soon translate to upgrades for county arts facilities.

Until last January, hotel and motel taxes in King County went to pay the debt for the demolished Kingdome, right down to repairs for fallen ceiling tiles. 

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district.

There are seven districts and two at-large positions – those council members will be elected by every voting Seattle resident.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district. In District 7, which includes Magnolia, Queen Anne and downtown, three candidates are running.

We asked the candidates to meet us somewhere in their district that signified why they’re running.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district.

In District 6, which includes the Green Lake, Ballard and Phinney Ridge neighborhoods, four candidates are running.

We asked the candidates to meet us somewhere in their district that signified why they’re running.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district.

District 5, which extends north beyond 85th Street, includes Bitter Lake and Northgate. There, eight candidates are vying to represent the area.

We asked the candidates to meet us somewhere in their district that signified why they’re running.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district.

In District 3, which includes Montlake, Madison Park and parts of Capitol Hill, five candidates are running. We asked them to meet us somewhere meaningful in their district.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district.

In District 2, which includes the International District south to Rainier Beach, there are three candidates.

We asked them to meet us somewhere in their district that signified why they’re running.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

For the first time in a century, Seattle voters will choose their City Council members by district. In District 1, which encompasses West Seattle and South Park, nine candidates are running.

We asked them to meet us somewhere in the district that signifies why they’re running.

(Photo courtesy of the University of Washington)

Update: Two days after this story was published, on Tuesday, June 30, Gov. Jay Inslee signed Washington’s state budget. The new budget includes $20 million over the next two years for drug prevention and education.

The campaign to legalize marijuana promised that almost a quarter of the taxes from those sales would fund education and prevention efforts.

And pot is selling well: Washington state’s marijuana retail stores are selling over $1 million worth of marijuana a day.

Terrell Jackson reopened his family's Catfish Corner restaurant in Rainier Beach, closer to old customers.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

If you want to track displacement from Seattle’s Central Area, just follow the restaurants. Jackson’s Catfish Corner in Rainier Beach started on East Cherry Street. That former restaurant, a neighborhood mainstay, was sold last year and is now boarded up.

Lee Townsend with the Metroplitan Improvement District checks his "hotspots" in Belltown for litter...and worse.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Over the past year, street sweepers in downtown Seattle saw a dramatic increase in the number of syringes on the ground. But those numbers have declined since March. They’re a data point in the larger debate over policing and drug use downtown.

Maria Moses of Dockside Cannabis in Shoreline, Washington, shows off a jar where customers can smell a marijuana sample.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

When recreational marijuana became legal in Washington state, people wondered what would happen to medical marijuana dispensaries.

Gov. Jay Inslee answered that question in April, when he signed a law requiring they obtain licenses and join the state regulatory system.

But medical marijuana dispensary owners have more questions about emerging from the shadows, and they’re turning Robert McVay, an attorney with Seattle’s Canna Law Group.

Fishmonger Andrew Wichmann says cruise ship traffic is great for Seattle but doesn't do much for him directly. They can't bring food onboard. "We wouldn't survive without local clientele."
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

The cruise ship docked at 7 a.m.

By 8 a.m., Danielle Smith and her family were at Pike Place Market, walking through the stalls. They had 48 hours to enjoy the city before flying home to Atlanta.

Stephanie Schendel, a Bellevue Police Department recruit, rinses out her eyes after being pepper-sprayed.  She's assisted by recruit Melissa Calder, who used to be a Lamaze coach.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Some recruits at Washington state’s police academy have policing in their blood – their parents or grandparents were police officers. Stephanie Schendel is not among them.

“I don’t come from a law enforcement family; I come from a family of nurses actually, so this has been a lot for them,” she said.

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