Amy Radil

Reporter

Amy Radil joined KUOW as a reporter covering politics and government in 2005. She got her start in radio as a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio from 1997 to 2000. She then freelanced for four years from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, contributing primarily to two public radio programs, The World and Marketplace. Amy graduated from Williams College in 1994 and received an M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in 1997.

Ways To Connect

Flickr Photo/~C4Chaos (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The ongoing debate about how to regulate ridesharing in Seattle seems to be coming down to a fight over numbers. The Seattle City Council is considering capping the number of licensed rideshare drivers but is getting pushback from the companies who thus far have been operating in Seattle illegally.

Flickr Photo/Spiros Vathis

Rideshare companies have been flourishing in Seattle – illegally. On Friday, the City Council will consider a new plan to finally regulate taxi-alternatives like Lyft, Sidecar and UberX.

AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

A legal organization in Seattle said that interim chief of the Seattle Police Department Harry Bailey’s comments about a recent officer-involved shooting will make it harder for investigators to do their jobs and undermine the troubled department's commitment to reform.

Flickr Photo/SalFalko (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Religious institutions in Washington have previously been exempt from discrimination rules but that could be changing. The Washington Supreme Court said in decisions Thursday that some employees whose duties are non-religious can bring discrimination claims against these nonprofits.

Flickr Photo/Tariq Abdel-Monem (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Correction 2/5/2014: The text of this story has been edited to reflect that the court action is a motion (not a lawsuit).

The Seattle newspaper The Stranger is seeking more openness in the case of two witnesses who were detained for refusing to testify before a grand jury by filing a motion to unseal federal court records.

Flickr Photo/401(K) 2012

Attorney General Eric Holder recently said that legal marijuana businesses need access to bank accounts as a public safety issue. Bankers and pot entrepreneurs hailed those comments as an important step. But they said it will take a change in federal law to make banks truly open their doors.

NPR Photo/Martin Kaste

The Seattle Police Department made national headlines when officers gave away bags of Doritos at last year’s Hempfest. But some police officers were not supportive of the department’s lighthearted approach to marijuana users.

Courtesy of CondoInternet

Network engineer Lee Kirk was working for Comcast when a friend of his tried to hire him away to Gigabit Squared Seattle for a partnership between the company and the city to improve Internet service in the area.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray, sworn in on Monday, wasted no time hiring a new interim police chief: Former Assistant Chief Harry Bailey.

Credit Katherine Hitt / Flickr

State officials promise that Washington’s new legal marijuana market will be airtight, and that plants will be tracked “from seed to sale.”

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

At a press conference on Thursday, Seattle Mayor-elect Ed Murray said Seattle must figure out ways to help low-wage workers, or it risks becoming a city of the rich. He has appointed a task force to study “income inequality,” but no one expects the process to be easy.

KUOW Photo/Derek Wang

Seattle trash pickup could be reduced to every other week by 2015 if the Seattle City Council votes on Monday to keep that option on the table for the next year.

If the action passes as expected, biweekly service won’t be definite, however: Mayor-elect Ed Murray and  council members will still need to pass the legislation early next year.

Last year on Dec. 6, pot smokers gathered spontaneously at Seattle Center to celebrate the passage of Initiative 502.

The year since Washington became one of the first states to legalize and regulate recreational marijuana, entrepreneurs, regulators, police, drug counselors and everyone in between has tried to understand the implications of the new law. 

The Washington State Patrol is arresting more drivers who test positive for marijuana than in previous years. That’s according to the latest statistics from the state toxicology lab.

The Washington State Patrol said that in the first half of 2013, 745 drivers tested positive for “active THC” from using marijuana. In recent years, about 1,000 drivers have tested positive for marijuana over the course of the year. So if the 2013 trend holds steady, this year would see a sizable increase in the number of marijuana-impaired drivers arrested. 

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

The University of Washington Board of Regents unanimously voted to move ahead with a new, underground animal testing lab on Thursday, saying that it will mean better conditions for animals used in medical and scientific research. 

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