Amy Radil

Reporter

Amy Radil joined KUOW as a reporter covering politics and government in 2005. She got her start in radio as a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio from 1997 to 2000. She then freelanced for four years from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, contributing primarily to two public radio programs, The World and Marketplace. Amy graduated from Williams College in 1994 and received an M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in 1997.

Ways To Connect

Amy Radil

Initiative 594 took effect Thursday, and Washington joined six other states with the broadest background checks for gun sales. Cheryl Stumbo and other members of the Washington Alliance for Gun Responsibility marked the date with a press conference at Plymouth Church in downtown Seattle.

“Initiative 594 is in effect, and today Washington has closed the background check loophole,” Stumbo said as members applauded.

Seattle Medical Marijuana van, usually parked outside a dispensary on Fremont Avenue near the Woodland Park Zoo. Tensions have mounted between medical marijuana entities and state-licensed pot shops.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Across Seattle are storefronts with green crosses out front – medical marijuana providers.

Seattle has long been friendly to these businesses, but there’s mounting friction between them and state-licensed stores as lawmakers sort out the state’s new legal marijuana law.

This week, the City of Seattle will hold a symposium on the city’s booming medical marijuana scene. The event comes as city officials are trying to gently rein in these unregulated businesses.

Marcie Sillman speaks with KUOW reporter Amy Radil  about the changes Seattle Mayor Ed Murray made this week concerning police accountability. He’s making a citizen oversight group called the Community Police Commission permanent.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

To become the Starbucks of marijuana: That’s an alluring goal for the new entrants in Washington’s legal pot business.

So far, state regulations have kept these businesses small. But even now, some marijuana businesses are ramping up to grow bigger and cross state lines.

Washington’s Initiative 594 requires universal background checks for gun purchases and transfers, including private and online sales. 

Initial election results indicate passage is likely, and backers say they are energized by the presumed victory. The opposing measure to bar expanded background checks, Initiative 591, has fallen short of passing so far.

Amy Radil

The Marysville-Pilchuck High School shootings occurred as Washington voters prepared to vote on two gun initiatives.

No one argues that either of these initiatives would have prevented the school shooting, but people on both sides of the debate say the incident could still weigh on voters’ minds.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Someone pursuing a complaint about a Seattle police officer no longer needs to enter the Seattle Police Department to do so. Instead, the department’s civilian oversight director has moved his office into a space he says will be more welcoming.

KUOW Photo/Austin Jenkins

Washington’s upcoming vote on gun laws is being closely watched around the country.

It’s the first time a state has presented voters with two competing initiatives on gun regulations – one to require universal background checks and the other to prevent them. It’s also marked a new surge in campaign donations to regulate gun sales in Washington state. Advocates for background checks call the donations “a sea change” that could have ripple effects in other states.

Amy Radil

The Seattle City Council is poised to approve new regulations governing microhousing. The bill would set new minimum requirements for tiny apartments and dorm-style projects. Developers say the regulations would kill off these projects entirely.

Marcie Sillman sits down with KUOW reporter Amy Radil to talk about a recent meeting at the Capitol Hill precinct where Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole addressed police use of force and tickets that were issued for smoking marijuana in public.

Flickr Photo/Tariq Abdel-Monem (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Seattle police officers are not using enough force.

That’s according to an internal email sent last week. The email, obtained by KUOW, says that hesitancy to use force could pose risks to officers and the public.

KUOW Photo/Michael Clinard

In the first six months of its new ordinance, the Seattle Police Department issued about 100 citations for smoking pot in public.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Jillian Smith, a student at Seattle Pacific University, recently returned to the building where a fatal shooting had taken place months before.

Seattle mayor Ed Murray says putting more police officers on the street will be one of his big-ticket budget priorities next year.

TRANSCRIPT

Murray’s 2015 budget proposal seeks to hire 100 additional police officers, a move that would cost $3.3 million dollars over two years.

SPD is also developing new policing plans for specific neighborhoods based on its most recent data.

Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O’Toole says she plans to hire some civilians for in-house positions so officers can be freed up.

Courtesy King County

Efforts to implement civilian oversight of the King County Sheriff’s Office have faced a rocky path. Last week the first person ever to head the Office of Law Enforcement Oversight resigned.

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