Amy Radil

Reporter

Amy Radil joined KUOW as a reporter covering politics and government in 2005. She got her start in radio as a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio from 1997 to 2000. She then freelanced for four years from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, contributing primarily to two public radio programs, The World and Marketplace. Amy graduated from Williams College in 1994 and received an M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in 1997.

Ways To Connect

Amy Radil

The Seattle City Council is poised to approve new regulations governing microhousing. The bill would set new minimum requirements for tiny apartments and dorm-style projects. Developers say the regulations would kill off these projects entirely.

Marcie Sillman sits down with KUOW reporter Amy Radil to talk about a recent meeting at the Capitol Hill precinct where Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole addressed police use of force and tickets that were issued for smoking marijuana in public.

Flickr Photo/Tariq Abdel-Monem (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Seattle police officers are not using enough force.

That’s according to an internal email sent last week. The email, obtained by KUOW, says that hesitancy to use force could pose risks to officers and the public.

KUOW Photo/Michael Clinard

In the first six months of its new ordinance, the Seattle Police Department issued about 100 citations for smoking pot in public.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Jillian Smith, a student at Seattle Pacific University, recently returned to the building where a fatal shooting had taken place months before.

Seattle mayor Ed Murray says putting more police officers on the street will be one of his big-ticket budget priorities next year.

TRANSCRIPT

Murray’s 2015 budget proposal seeks to hire 100 additional police officers, a move that would cost $3.3 million dollars over two years.

SPD is also developing new policing plans for specific neighborhoods based on its most recent data.

Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O’Toole says she plans to hire some civilians for in-house positions so officers can be freed up.

Courtesy King County

Efforts to implement civilian oversight of the King County Sheriff’s Office have faced a rocky path. Last week the first person ever to head the Office of Law Enforcement Oversight resigned.

KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

Jenny Durkan, the U.S. Attorney for Western Washington, announced her resignation Wednesday, saying she felt the time was right to go.

Durkan spent five years as the region’s top law enforcement official, which she said was longer than she’d planned.

Amy Radil / KUOW

Friday’s ruling by a Pierce County judge was good news for Washington cities that want to ban marijuana stores. Yet it was also greeted with enthusiasm by supporters of the state’s marijuana legalization efforts.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

A lawsuit over bans on marijuana businesses is headed to Pierce County Superior Court. The legal challenge has put the tiny city of Fife in the spotlight. That’s because the case could potentially derail Washington’s new system for legalized marijuana.

Initiative 502 provided for a new regulatory system for legal marijuana sales. But does that law give cities the ability to ban marijuana businesses if they so choose? That’s the first question for the court.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

As part of the comedy duo Cheech and Chong, Tommy Chong portrayed marijuana users as slapstick buffoons. But now he’s in Seattle for what he says is the serious endeavor of promoting the benefits of marijuana – and his personal brand.

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

As German composer Richard Wagner contemplated the Ring cycle in the 19th century, he decided it wasn’t enough to create a four-night saga of gods and humans.

He also envisioned an instrument that didn’t yet exist, one that could sound "strident" one moment and “gorgeous and mellow” the next. He wrote the music for the Ring in the 1860s and 70s with the instrument in mind. Then he commissioned someone to build it.

Flickr Photo/John Biehler (Cc-BY-NC-ND)

Seattle’s Prop 1 is ahead 52.4 to 47.6 percent in Tuesday’s primary election totals. The measure would change the way park maintenance is funded. Supporters promise parks that are better maintained; opponents say accountability will be the challenge.

Amy Radil

After the hoopla settled down after the grand opening of Seattle’s first state-licensed retail marijuana store in July, pot aficionados found that retail stores were hard to find.

Two men who produced marijuana candy appeared in federal court Friday for a detention hearing . They’re accused of endangering others while manufacturing marijuana extracts.

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