Amy Radil

Reporter

Amy Radil joined KUOW as a reporter covering politics and government in 2005. She got her start in radio as a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio from 1997 to 2000. She then freelanced for four years from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, contributing primarily to two public radio programs, The World and Marketplace. Amy graduated from Williams College in 1994 and received an M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in 1997.

Ways To Connect

Josh Etzler, left, and colleague Jeff Stewart break for lunch in Tulalip. Etzler says marijuana retail stores could be undercut by tribes.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

In Les Parks’ perfect world, the Tulalip Tribes would not only legalize marijuana but fund research into its medical benefits.  

“I see Tulalip leading the country and being on this frontier for what this plant can do for mankind, basically,” said Parks, the Tulalips’ vice chairman and a longtime supporter of legalization, speaking from the tribe’s gleaming new government building, with sweeping views over Puget Sound.

Reporter Dominic Holden at his going-away roast after departing The Stranger,  Nov. 1, 2014. Holden submitted a complaint to the SPD after an incident in July 2013.
Joe Mabel

In the summer of 2013, Seattle journalist Dominic Holden, a reporter for The Stranger, filed a complaint with Seattle’s Office of Professional Accountability, saying a police officer tried to harass and intimidate him. The OPA sustained his complaint, saying the officer had broken rules on professional courtesy and deserved a one-day suspension without pay. The case was closed.

Then in February last year, Holden heard indirectly that the officer had appealed the finding. Interim SPD Chief Harry Bailey had reached a settlement with the officer in which the misconduct finding was, in fact, reversed.

OPA Director Pierce Murphy moved his offices out of SPD last year to make them more accessible for the public.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Complaints to Seattle’s police oversight office have risen dramatically in the first weeks of 2015. But officials say that’s not necessarily an indication of problems at SPD. It just means word about the organization is getting out.

TRANSCRIPT

If a Seattle resident has a complaint about an interaction with a police officer, they’re supposed to contact the city’s Office of Professional Accountability.

Only a fraction of those public inquiries are ultimately investigated for possible misconduct and officer discipline.

The ACLU of Washington has filed a lawsuit against Skagit Regional Health. It claims the public hospital’s policies create illegal barriers to abortion. Hospitals say they are required to offer abortions, but can’t make employees perform them.    

KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Early warnings for earthquakes already occur in Japan, and they’re being piloted in California. Now the University of Washington hopes to bring them to the Northwest.

Police agencies in Washington have started piloting the use of body-worn cameras. It’s a step supported by many officers, reformers, and the Obama administration to address police use of force. But both police and police watchdogs say the cameras are unworkable under current state law.

In December President Obama appointed former King County Sheriff Sue Rahr to his Task Force on 21st Century Policing.The group is charged with strengthening relationships between law enforcement and the people they serve. 

Amy Radil

In coming months, all patients in the University of Washington health system and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance will be asked for their permission to have medical records and leftover blood or tissue made available for future research.

Seattle City Councilmember Tom Rasmussen says he won't slack off in his last year: "Call me if you need a stop sign put in."
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Another longtime Seattle City Council member has announced he will not seek reelection this year. Tom Rasmussen said he’ll retire from the council after twelve years. His announcement follows Nick Licata’s similar news last Thursday.

A national campaign has highlighted the thousands of untested sexual assault kits held by police. Now the Seattle Police Department has pledged to send every sexual assault kit for testing by the state crime lab.

Christopher Monfort is escorted into the courtroom on the first day of his trial for murdering SPD Officer Timothy Brenton, along with other charges, on Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Opening arguments were heard Tuesday in the trial of Christopher Monfort. He’s accused of killing Seattle Police Officer Timothy Brenton in 2009.

Jurors will have to determine whether they believe Monfort was sane at the time of the shooting.

Monfort was shot and paralyzed during his arrest by police. He uses a wheelchair; court sessions will be shorter than usual to accommodate his medical concerns.

King County Jail in downtown Seattle.
King County Photo

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray is protesting a new King County policy to release more felony suspects after booking them. King County says it’s a budget decision involving nonviolent offenders. The mayor says it’s a threat to public safety.

Recology CleanScapes Driver Rodney Watkins issues a red tag.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Beware the red tag, the scarlet letter of Seattle waste.

The bright red tag says you’ve violated the city’s new trash law, making it illegal to put food into trash cans.

“I’m sure neighbors are going to see these on their other neighbors’ cans,” said Rodney Watkins, a lead driver for Recology CleanScapes, a waste contractor for the city. He’s on the front lines of enforcing these rules.

Larry Jametsky and Christina Stewart back at home in SeaTac, Wash., Dec. 2014
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Larry Jametsky lost his home in SeaTac through a “foreclosure rescue” scam. He and his family were homeless for years while his case made its way through the courts.

But last February, the Washington Supreme Court ruled unanimously that his case should be reexamined. Two months later, Jametsky got his house back.

In 2008, Jametsky signed what he thought was a loan, but he’d actually sold his house for a fraction of its value. What he thought were loan payments were in fact rent payments.

Maria Moses of Dockside Cannabis in Shoreline, Washington, shows off a jar where customers can smell a marijuana sample.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

When you talk to the state’s licensed growers and sellers of marijuana, you discover that many initially opposed Initiative 502. They favored marijuana legalization, but they didn’t like the details of the initiative itself.

That was the case for Danielle and Juddy Rosellison of Bellingham, Washington. But once voters approved the initiative, Danielle said they jumped right in. 

“We got two mortgages on the two homes that we own," she said. "I called all our credit cards and told them I was going to put a BMW on it and they extended our limits to ridiculous amounts.”

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