Amy Radil | KUOW News and Information

Amy Radil

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2005

Amy Radil joined KUOW as a reporter covering politics and government in 2005. She got her start in radio as a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio from 1997 to 2000. She then freelanced for four years from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, contributing primarily to two public radio programs, The World and Marketplace. Amy graduated from Williams College in 1994 and received an M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in 1997.

Ways to Connect

Outside the home of her foster sister Renee Davis, Danielle Bargala breaks down in tears while talking about how Davis' young children are living with different families. Davis, who was pregnant, was shot at her Muckleshoot reservation home last October.
Dan DeLong for KUOW

The young mom texted her boyfriend: “Come and get the girls or call 911. I’m about to shoot myself.”


Faith leaders meet with U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell at the Jewish Federation of Seattle on Friday to discuss recent hate crimes.
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

Seattle police are investigating after a Capitol Hill synagogue was vandalized with anti-Semitic, Holocaust-denying graffiti.

In a message posted on the Facebook of Temple De Hirsch Sinai, Rabbi Daniel Weiner said the graffiti was spray-painted on the facade of the temple's Old Sanctuary and discovered Friday morning.

A march protesting the Seattle police shooting of Che Taylor on Feb. 21 moves through downtown Seattle on Feb. 25, 2016.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Under the Trump administration, the Justice Department will reduce its emphasis on investigating and suing police departments. Justice officials under President Barack Obama called the Seattle Police Department a success story for this process. 

People involved in Seattle's 2012 consent decree have mixed feelings about the new direction. 

Amy Radil

Being a Daffodil Princess in Pierce County is not about winning a pageant. Kelty Pierce, 19, is emphatic on that point.

The federal courthouse in downtown Seattle.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

Making a list of banned countries just doesn't make sense, said John McKay, a former U.S. attorney for Western Washington who was appointed by President George W. Bush. He now teaches law at Seattle University.


Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

A federal judge in Seattle who was criticized by President Donald Trump after slapping a hold on the refugee travel ban got some backup Thursday: a unanimous appeals court ruling against Trump's executive order.

And a constitutional law professor singled out some key language in the ruling as particularly telling.


Adams County had the highest use rate of the state exchange at 50 percent.
Courtesy of 1in4WA.com

As Congress looks at changes to the Affordable Care Act, the creators of Washington’s health insurance exchange are advocating for the state’s current system – with maps.

Those maps show where the exchange has had the greatest rate of participation in the state: Trump country.


Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson prepares to talk to the media about a federal judge's ruling on the Trump refugee order Friday, Feb. 3, 2017.
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

What was the scene like?

KUOW’s Amy Radil: It's usually pretty sedate but there was a huge turnout to see this hearing. I heard some court employees talking saying they've never seen such a crowd. The courtrooms aren't that big so there was an overflow room a few floors up where people watched it on video.

Father Tim Clark of Our Lady of the Lake Roman Catholic Church in Seattle.
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

Father Tim Clark found this Sunday's Christian scripture particularly relevant to the turmoil over President Donald Trump’s orders on refugees and immigrants.

It was Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount, where he blesses the meek and the merciful.


Dan Satterberg (left), Andre Tayor (brother of Che Taylor who was fatally shot by police), and former SPD Chief Norm Stamper at a community meeting.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

An inquest is scheduled to get underway at the King County Courthouse this week in the death of Che Taylor. In February 2016, Taylor was shot by Seattle police in the Wedgwood neighborhood. Now a jury will hear more facts of the case.

Washington Democrats chair Jaxon Ravens faces challengers from within the party.
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

Democrats and Republicans in Washington state will vote on their parties’ leadership this weekend.

And the differences are stark.


King County Sheriff John Urquhart
AP Photo/Susan Walsh

King County Sheriff John Urquhart doesn't think much of President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration.

"We don't ask somebody about their immigration status,” Urquhart said. “We don't ask for a green card.  We don't ask for anything like that. And that policy is not going to change."


Tonia Arehart offered some encouragement to the high school students and others joining a protest at Seattle Central College on Friday.
KUOW photo/Amy Radil

The day started with an inauguration viewing event at Town Hall. And Friday night, Seattle was wrapping up with a big protest at Westlake Park and another at the University of Washington.

In between ...

Roosevelt High School
Flickr Photo/Joe Wolf (CC BY-ND 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/fuH8hN

Some Seattle student groups — from colleges to middle schools — are organizing walkouts and protests of Donald Trump’s presidency on Inauguration Day.  

Seattle Public Schools officials say, as with past protests, students who take part may be marked “unexcused.” Now Seattle high school and middle school students upset about the election results are weighing that decision.

Susan Gress says Sessions as AG is just the latest uncertainty for her business. Susan Gress says Jeff Sessions as attorney general is just the latest uncertainty for her business.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

For years, John Davis has helped produce Seattle Hempfest, a sprawling outdoor celebration of all things marijuana. 

Pages