Amy Radil | KUOW News and Information

Amy Radil

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2005

Amy Radil joined KUOW as a reporter covering politics and government in 2005. She got her start in radio as a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio from 1997 to 2000. She then freelanced for four years from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, contributing primarily to two public radio programs, The World and Marketplace. Amy graduated from Williams College in 1994 and received an M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in 1997.

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Saying they want to keep up the pressure on elected officials to pass new gun control measures, Seattle-area students joined a national school walkout on the 19th anniversary of the shooting at Columbine High School.

But they said Friday’s gathering was intended to shine a light on gun violence in the U.S. beyond shootings on school grounds. 

Seattle Preschool Program teacher Hien Do, center, sits in a circle with her students on Wednesday, June 28, 2017, at the ReWA Early Learning Center at Beacon, in Seattle, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan has proposed a new, bigger education levy that would take city dollars from elementary schools. That money would instead go to adding preschool slots, two years of free community college and counseling for high school students.

Democrat donkey
Flickr Photo/Georgia Democrats (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/a77qRq

King County Democrats say they’ve been torn this year between resolving a workplace scandal in their own ranks, and supporting candidates in this much-anticipated election year. Now they say they’re ready to move forward.

Marilyn Covarrubias, center, is comforted as she begins to cry while testifying about the shooting death in 2015 of her son by police, at a House Public Safety Committee hearing on Jan. 31, 2017, in Olympia, Wash.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

The family of an unarmed Native American man killed by Lakewood Police in 2015 is suing the city in federal court. The complaint accuses the department of racial bias and negligence in its training.

Gayle Nowicki owns Gargoyles Statuary in Seattle's University District. She says small businesses are already closing due to taxes and zoning changes.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Small businesses in Seattle disagree about a possible new tax to ease homelessness. But they agree on this: They can't afford it. 

Garfield High School in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Joe Wolf (CC BY ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1GgN2Xe

All three finalists for Seattle Public Schools' next superintendent agree on three things:

Charter schools — no.

Arming teachers — no.

Supporting student walkouts — yes.

Reilly Donham, 18, of Mill Creek, Washington, attends the 'March for Our Lives' rally in Seattle on Saturday morning.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

We are at the 'March for Our Lives' in Seattle this morning where 50,000 students and their families are expected to rally. We will update this post as the march progresses.

University Prep students attend a walkout rally on Wednesday, March 14, 2018, at Red Square on the University of Washington campus in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Student organizers say Saturday’s March For Our Lives rally in Seattle will emphasize voter registration and concrete steps young people can take to advocate against gun violence.

Dr. Fred Rivara demonstrated how quickly a lockbox can be opened to give access to guns stored there.
KUOW/Amy Radil

Washington state law generally prohibits local governments from overstepping state gun regulations. But Seattle officials say there are still measures they can take to curb gun violence.

Recruits from around the region, including Seattle Police Department, on the first day at the police academy.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

There are still a lot of things Marilyn Covarrubias doesn’t understand about why her son Daniel died in an encounter with Lakewood police officers in 2015. Like why the officers mistook his cell phone for a gun. Why they didn’t call for medical help sooner after the shooting. And why they were so quick to open fire.

“They need to learn how to ascertain what is actually happening," Covarrubias said. "Before they go into kill mode.” 

KUOW hosts 'That's Debatable: Amazon is Good for Seattle' on Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Explain this: while half the people at KUOW's Amazon debate Wednesday came to the conclusion that the company is not good for Seattle, three-quarters of the audience also said they have an Amazon Prime membership. 


Traffic in downtown Seattle is shown on Monday, July 17, 2017, from Rizal Park.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Apples over mangoes. Veggies over steak. Shorter showers and less driving alone. Those are some of the ways Seattle residents say they’re changing their habits as they compete to reduce their carbon footprints as part of the Taming Bigfoot competition.

Gov. Jay Inslee, D-Wash., right, speaks about school safety during an event with President Donald Trump and members of the National Governors Association in the State Dining Room of the White House, Monday, Feb. 26, 2018, in Washington.
AP Photo/Evan Vucci

This week in a meeting with President Trump, Washington Governor Jay Inslee recommended our state’s “extreme risk protection orders” as a way to keep guns away from people in crisis. Inslee said the orders have been “supremely effective” at allowing families to get firearms away from people at risk of harming themselves or others.


KUOW/Amy Radil

Marilyn Balcerak said she can predict that the birthdays of her son and stepdaughter will be hard. What’s harder to predict are the random events that will take her back to the day when her son James — who had autism and struggled with depression — killed his stepsister Brianna and then himself in 2015. One of those events was the shooting at the high school in Florida last week.

EPA investigators bought samples of banned pesticides listed for sale on Amazon.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

In one of their first attempts to regulate the online marketplace, officials with the Environmental Protection Agency in Seattle said they’ve reached a settlement with Amazon over distribution of illegal pesticides.

According to EPA officials, it was interns at the agency who first spotted banned and mislabeled pesticides being offered for sale on Amazon. 

Downtown Seattle accounts for more than half the city's construction investments, according to DSA.
KUOW/Megan Farmer

This year Seattle was named the top investment and development market in the country by the Urban Land Institute. And investors have taken note.

In the next two years, according to the Downtown Seattle Association, the area will see 2,400 new hotel rooms, 8,000 new residential units and millions of square feet of new office space.  And even more is to come in 2020. 

It's not clear how many trees on private property in Seattle have been cut down for development projects.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Tree advocates say if Seattle wants to do a better job counting and preserving trees, it should follow the lead of its suburbs.

In "The Burning Question," KUOW takes a close look at Seattle’s goal of carbon neutrality and what it would take to get there. It turns out a lot of those solutions are right around us.

So, what would it be like to wake up in a Seattle that’s really on track to be carbon neutral? Here are seven snapshots of what success might look like. 

Pedestrians cross Pike Street in front of the Convention Center on Tuesday, December 12, 2017, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

You might think that before a massive project like the convention center expansion is approved, Seattle would decide how the city’s ambitious climate change goals might be affected.

You’d be wrong.


sea levels seattle
Seattle.gov

Jack Block Park seems like an unlikely leisure spot, tucked among railroad tracks and Port of Seattle cranes. But it also provides a panoramic view of West Seattle, downtown and Harbor Island.

In maps created by Seattle Public Utilities, parts of Jack Block Park in West Seattle are colored red. Those are the areas that meteorologist and mapmaker James Rufo-Hill said could someday be underwater as sea levels rise due to climate change.


KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

More electric vehicles. More charging stations. More transit. Congestion pricing for cars. Funds for affordable housing. And lobbying for a statewide carbon tax. Those are just some of the ideas Mayor Jenny Durkan and her supporters are considering to help Seattle meet ambitious carbon-emissions goals.  


Jenny Durkan at her election night party on Tuesday, Nov. 9, 2017
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle mayor-elect Jenny Durkan greeted her 61-member transition team at a meeting at McCaw Hall Thursday. Members gave her a standing ovation after her introduction by former King County Executive Ron Sims, who said he is “ecstatic” about Durkan’s win.

Rosa Melendez, right, points toward Jenny Durkan as she thanks her volunteers on Tuesday, November 7, 2017, at The Westin in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Tuesday’s election results gave Jenny Durkan a formidable 21-point lead over rival Cary Moon. At the Westin hotel in downtown Seattle, Durkan celebrated the news without declaring victory.

But Durkan said she’s also preparing for a rapid transition to the mayor’s office.

It should be a sleepy special election for a state Senate seat in the Seattle suburbs.

But instead, Tuesday's contest between two first-time political candidates, both women and both children of immigrants, is shattering previous state spending records and is drawing six-figure checks from donors around the country.

At stake is control of the Washington state Senate, where the GOP holds a one-seat majority. It's currently the only Republican-held legislative chamber on the West Coast.

Karen Toering said she contributed to Oliver's campaign. 'I had a lot of hope.'
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

People who voted for Nikkita Oliver in Seattle’s primary election say her run for mayor was a thrilling ride. They’re viewing the general election between Jenny Durkan and Cary Moon with a little less enthusiasm, if not disgust.


Jacob Mandell watches a mayoral debate during a viewing party on Tuesday, October 24, 2017, at Optimism Brewing Company in Seattle.
KUOW photo/Megan Farmer

After 10 quadrillion debates in this unending election season, could yet another one get waffling voters to pick Jenny Durkan or Cary Moon for Seattle mayor?

Yes, as it turns out, at least for some.

Mayoral candidates Jenny Durkan (left) and Cary Moon (right) enjoy the lightening round
KUOW Photo / Amy Radil

Former U.S. Attorney Jenny Durkan and urbanist Cary Moon have some really sharp differences. Take their feelings on Beecher's cheese and the Eagles, for instance.

On Saturday, March 19 light rail stations opened serving Capitol Hill and the University of Washington (pictured).
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle suddenly seems like a very small town —  at least when you look at the mayoral candidates and their family ties.


A previous attempt at providing broadband service through a public-private partnership fell apart in 2013.
Flickr Photo/Steve Rhode (CC BY-NC-ND)

Remember municipal broadband? The idea suffered a blow in Seattle when a partnership involving the city, the University of Washington and a private company fell apart in 2013.

But the dream never died. Now supporters are pushing another campaign.

Sharon Larcey and her boyfriend live in their vehicle. Sharon said many of her friends would benefit from a supervised drug site.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

At a King County council meeting earlier this month, Councilmember Jeanne Kohl-Welles sought to allay fears about supervised drug consumption sites being imposed on unwilling neighborhoods.


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