Amy Radil

Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2005

Amy Radil joined KUOW as a reporter covering politics and government in 2005. She got her start in radio as a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio from 1997 to 2000. She then freelanced for four years from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, contributing primarily to two public radio programs, The World and Marketplace. Amy graduated from Williams College in 1994 and received an M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in 1997.

Ways to Connect

Microphone in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

A group hoping to buy the public radio station KPLU from Pacific Lutheran University announced Thursday that it’s raised the money to do so.

General manager Joey Cohn delivered the news on-air with supporters cheering in the background. Reaching the $7 million goal paves the way for the group Friends of 88.5 FM to enter negotiations with PLU. If they reach a sale agreement, the previous offer from KUOW will be terminated.

Amy Radil

The campaign to replace retiring Congressman Jim McDermott is getting off the ground in Seattle. Most of the candidates for the seat held their first debate Wednesday at the University of Washington.


Marijuana plants growing at Seattle's first legal pot farm, Sea of Green.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

The Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board is taking steps to address high levels of pesticides found in some legal marijuana samples. But the agency does not currently require testing for pesticides. Growers say for now, it’s up to consumers to seek that information.

Donald Trump, gay icon?!

May 20, 2016
Supporters wearing "Gays for Trump" shirts at a rally for presidential frontronner Donald Trump rally in Lynden, Washington, on Saturday, May 7.
Daniel Berman

Donald Trump, gay icon?

For Keian Dayani of Seattle, totally. Dayani is a 29-year-old pharmacist, a Christian of Iranian descent.

Flickr Photo/Justin Grimes (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The campaign finance records collected by Washington’s Public Disclosure Commission haven’t always been easy to access. But the agency’s new director, Evelyn Fielding Lopez, says citizens need that information, and she has some interesting ideas on how to get it to them.  

Donald Trump is coming to Lynden, Wash.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

Residents of Lynden, Washington, were surprised that presidential candidate Donald Trump was coming to their small town near the Canadian border.

Now Trump’s campaign has offered an explanation -- and it has nothing to do with border security or any other issue Trump plans to talk about.

Debbi LerMond and other Trump supporters wave signs at an intersection in Duvall.  She says so many people flip them off that she calls this "bird-watching."
Courtesy of Larry Backstrom

Debbi LerMond calls it "bird-watching" – a reference to some of the hand signals she gets from drivers who pass by as she waves signs for Donald Trump near her home in Duvall, Washington.

But there's satisfaction -- and relief -- for LerMond and fellow Trump supporters in knowing that their candidate is the apparent Republican nominee, now that his remaining competitors have dropped out.

Kerry French at American Lake in Lakewood. She's campaigning for Sen. Ted Cruz in Pierce County.
KUOW PHOTO/Amy Radil

Overnight, Washington Republicans have had to change gears.

Tuesday they were preparing to welcome candidates Ted Cruz and John Kasich at presidential campaign rallies and events in the state. 

Now with those candidates out of the race, they’re deciding whether they want to support Donald Trump, the party's apparent nominee, or anyone at all.

The groups facing off on the proposed ballot measure are Just Want Privacy and Washington Won't Discriminate.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

A group in Washington state wants to force transgender people to use bathrooms and locker rooms corresponding to their biological sex.

A flyer from the Northwest Accountability Project carries this awkward photo of Tom McCabe, CEO of the Freedom Foundation, which does work to undermine unions.
Flyer from Northwest Accountablity Project

Late last year, some Washington residents received a flyer that looked leftover from election season.

It featured unflattering photos of someone named Tom McCabe and accused him of embracing “right-wing extremism.” But he wasn’t running for office.

BMW's all-electric i3 is one of the vehicles being offered by the company's new ReachNow car-sharing service.
COURTESY BMW

The carmaker BMW has made Seattle the launching pad for a new car-sharing service called ReachNow. It’s similar to Car2Go, and the city could allow still more companies to enter the market.

As KUOW’s Amy Radil reports, ReachNow says it plans other services as well. 

Kerry French at American Lake in Lakewood. She's campaigning for Sen. Ted Cruz in Pierce County.
KUOW PHOTO/Amy Radil

Kerry French, a Republican leader in Pierce County, campaigns for Ted Cruz, the presidential candidate, with a smart phone app.

Users earn “points” as they give information and get the word out. First comes a brief survey, which French demonstrated at a park in Lakewood, near her desk job at Camp Murray. 

“Would you describe yourself as evangelical? Yes. If I had to choose I’d probably say Tea Party-ish. Although Tea Party values are in our platform. So, Libertarian? Maybe a little.”

Susan Lee Rahr, executive director of the Wash. State Criminal Justice Training Commission and a member of President Obama's Task Force on 21st Century Policing, being sworn in May 19, 2015, to testify before a House Judiciary Committee hearing.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

In 2014, Sue Rahr was plucked from her job running the state’s police training commission to serve on the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing. It allowed her to bring her new approach to police training before a national audience.

She said she felt like a kid getting promoted to the grownups’ table.  

Officer Stephanie Schendel asks the Whole Foods employee what the shoplifters stole.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

We met Bellevue Officer Stephanie Schendel last year, as she made her way through the Washington state police academy

Precinct volunteers count caucus votes at Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary School in Seattle on Saturday, March 26. Democrats turned out across the state to support Bernie Sanders or Hillary Clinton.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders defeated Hillary Clinton by a wide margin Saturday in Washington state's Democratic caucuses, according to party results.

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