Amita Kelly | KUOW News and Information

Amita Kelly

Amita Kelly is a digital editor and producer on NPR's Washington Desk, where she executes election, politics, and policy coverage for NPR.org; manages the desk's social media presence; and develops multimedia projects and audience engagement initiatives.

She was previously an editor and producer for NPR's mid-day newsmagazine program Tell Me More, where she covered health, politics, parenting, and, once, how Korea celebrates St. Patrick's Day. Kelly has also worked at Kaiser Health News and NBC News.

Kelly was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Fellow at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism, where she earned her M.A., and earned a B.A. in English from Wellesley College. She is a native of Southern California, where even Santa surfs.

Kim Davis, the Kentucky clerk who went to jail after refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, was honored Friday at the Values Voter Summit in Washington, D.C. She was presented, to a standing ovation, the "Cost of Discipleship" Award by the conservative Family Research Council, which sponsored the summit.

"I am only one, but we are many," she said tearfully as she accepted the award. We spoke to some of Davis' supporters (along with one attendee who doesn't agree with her actions). Hear their voices below:

Speaker of the House John Boehner and Vice President Joe Biden cried as Pope Francis addressed Congress Thursday. Many other political leaders were visibly moved by the mere first-ever presence of a pope in the chamber.

Speaking outside the White House Wednesday, Pope Francis praised President Obama's environmental initiatives, calling climate change "a problem which can no longer be left to a future generation." The pope said he found it "encouraging" that the president is "proposing an initiative for reducing air pollution."

President Obama is taking some heat over who's been invited to attend Pope Francis' large arrival ceremony at the White House this Wednesday. The list includes the first openly gay Episcopal bishop, an activist nun and a transgender activist — guests the Vatican reportedly objected to, according to the Wall Street Journal.

It has been difficult for Hillary Clinton to seem relaxed and at ease on the campaign trail, especially as questions about her use of a private email server as secretary of state have dominated.

Fifteen Republican presidential candidates debated Wednesday night in California — the second Republican debate this season.

NPR's live debate chat is now closed, but you can see the archived chat below and post in the comments at the bottom of the page.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Carly Fiorina wants you to look at her face. The superPAC supporting her campaign released a new video, "Faces," hitting back at Donald Trump's recent comments on her appearance in which he said "Look at that face!" and "Would anyone vote for that?"

The White House announced Thursday that the U.S. is preparing to take in at least 10,000 Syrian refugees starting Oct. 1 (the start of the fiscal year). This year, the U.S. is on track to take in about 1,500 Syrian refugees, White House spokesman Josh Earnest said. He reiterated that the U.S. has provided $4 billion in humanitarian aid to Syrian refugees.

Ahead of next week's Republican debate on CNN, Donald Trump is calling on the network to donate all of its profits to various veterans groups.

This post was updated at 5 p.m. ET Thursday

Congress is back with a daunting must-do list, but its first order of business was the Iran nuclear deal. Senate Democrats successfully filibustered a disapproval resolution on Thursday that was meant to kill the deal. The vote was 58-42 --Senate Republicans and other opponents needed 60 to pass.

Funeral services were held Friday for slain Harris County Deputy Darren Goforth. He was shot to death a week ago as he pumped gas into his police car. Police called it "an unprovoked execution-style killing."

Kim Davis, a clerk in Rowan County, Ky., is in jail for refusing to issue marriage licenses after same-sex marriage became legal. A same-sex couple received a marriage license in Davis' office Friday morning from a deputy clerk.

But the controversy isn't over. It has divided the crowded campaign trail into those who stand with Davis, and those who don't — plus one in the middle.

In an interview with conservative website Breitbart, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump dug into his opponent Jeb Bush, saying he should lead by speaking English while in the U.S.

"I like Jeb," Trump said, according to Breitbart. "He's a nice man. But he should really set the example by speaking English while in the United States."

Of the more than 7,000 pages of Hillary Clinton's emails released by the State Department this week, one was (literally) fishy:

Gefilte fish is a Jewish dish (some would say delicacy) made of chopped fish. The night of the email release, reaction and theories on the story behind that email came in quickly:

In reality, the email was sent during a 2010 U.S.-Israeli trade dispute. Israel had imposed a large tariff on imported carp (often used in the dish). That tariff was particularly harming one American fishery that exported a lot of carp to Israel.

President Obama has slow-jammed the news on late-night TV and sat down with wacky YouTube celebrities. The show he's joining this week might just make those appearances look buttoned up and boring.

The State Department released some 7,000 pages of Hillary Clinton's emails Monday from her time as secretary of state. This batch is the latest in a series of monthly, court-ordered releases that started in May. This is the largest batch so far.

An early scan reveals little new information — a lot of logistics planning, tech issues and news articles sent around. One email appears to suggest some confusion at the State Department help desk about Clinton's actual email address.

In a new report and letter sent to congressional leadership, Planned Parenthood contends that controversial videos alleging the organization sells fetal tissue have been "heavily edited in order to significantly change the meaning" of what its staff said.

Ben Carson alleged in an interview with Fox News Wednesday that Planned Parenthood puts most of its clinics in black neighborhoods to "control the population" and that its founder, Margaret Sanger, "was not particularly enamored with black people."

President Obama is facing deep skepticism in Congress, which votes next month on whether to disapprove the nuclear deal with Iran. The president contends that the public will better appreciate the deal in the years after it has taken effect.

The top 10 Republican presidential candidates, as determined by Fox News, took the stage together for the first time Thursday night in Cleveland. The other seven, who ranked lower in Fox News' analysis of recent polls, debated earlier in the evening.

NPR's politics team hosted a live chat for both debates. The archived chat is below:

This post was updated at 9:30 a.m. ET

The Republican presidential candidates are getting in their last-minute prep before Thursday night's debates. They will be separated into two events — the bottom seven in polls, as determined by a Fox News analysis, will debate at 5 p.m. And the top ten will take the primetime stage at 9 p.m.

In a new video, presidential candidate Ted Cruz has manages to combine one of America's near-universal loves with one of its more contentious pastimes: bacon and guns.

Presidential candidate Mike Huckabee said over the weekend that President Obama's Iran deal is so bad it will "take the Israelis and march them to the door of the oven."

Candidates, politicians and groups were quick to denounce — or defend — the Holocaust reference.

Here's Huckabee's full quote, said in an interview with Breitbart News' editor-in-chief, Alexander Marlow, on Saturday:

A historic agreement with Iran over its nuclear program was negotiated in part by the Obama administration and heavily praised by the president. "This deal offers an opportunity to move in a new direction," Obama said Tuesday morning. Congress has 60 days to review the deal, and if it goes through, of course, following through on that "new direction" will largely be up to the next president.

The candidates clamoring for that title had something to say about it.

"I love America." That's how Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker kicked off his presidential campaign in Waukesha Monday. He's the latest candidate to join the crowded Republican side, but he enters far from the bottom. He's topping nearly every poll in Iowa and made a strong showing at early gatherings.

And the big three of his announcement, in his words: Reform. Growth. Safety.

Marilyn Mosby, Baltimore's African-American state's attorney, took the spotlight earlier this year when she filed charges against six police officers in her own city. The officers were charged in connection with the death of Freddie Gray, an African-American man who died while in custody.

It was a powerful image to some Baltimore residents — an African-American woman who said she heard where the city's protesters were coming from, but also that she came from a family of police officers and needed the public to let her do her job.

Call it the latest sign of "Bernie-mentum" — Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders' latest event in Madison, Wis., on Wednesday drew an estimated 10,000 supporters. He packed the arena at Veterans Memorial Coliseum in the liberal college town.

Sanders said last month that he was "stunned" by the large crowds showing up for him. Organizers were once shocked by 300 in Iowa, then 5,000 in Minnesota.

President Obama gave a rousing speech Friday at the funeral of state Sen. and Rev. Clementa Pinckney, one of nine people shot at Emanuel AME church in Charleston, S.C., earlier this month.

The president spoke for more than 35 minutes about the reverend's legacy and teachings, and Obama said that he had spent much of the week reflecting on grace.

After the Supreme Court's decision effectively legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide came down at 10 a.m. ET, the 2016 hopefuls weighed in quickly.

The Republican side of the field has opposed same-sex marriage, but in responding to Friday's decision, most of the candidates struck a measured tone — many noting they support traditional marriage and religious freedom and disagree with the court — but also stressed the importance of respect and tolerance for all Americans.

Following the Supreme Court health care ruling to uphold subsidies nationwide, President Obama said Thursday that the Affordable Care Act is "here to stay."

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