Amina Al-Sadi | KUOW News and Information

Amina Al-Sadi

Producer, The Record

Ways to Connect

Amazon Spheres, downtown Seattle
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

If you've driven through South Lake Union in the last seven years, you have probably seen the structures emerge. Three round orbs made of steel and glass were filled with 40,000 plants from nearly 30 different countries to create an urban rainforest. 

Flickr Photo/ Carol Munro (CC BY-NC 2.0)/ https://flic.kr/p/7x2ngB

In the early, early hours of Tuesday morning phones lit up along the Washington coast alerting to the possibility of a tsunami. A 7.9 magnitude earthquake had just hit in the Gulf of Alaska.

The things is, not ALL the phones on the WA coast lit up. And as for that alert, it said there was a tsunami "watch" not a warning. Some people evacuated, some people didn't know whether they should.

This exposes a lot of questions about how ready we are for the big waves. The Seattle Times' science reporter Sandi Doughton explains what was learned after this latest tsunami warning.

Mortician Caitlin Doughty, with some tools of the trade.
Photo by Jeff Minton.

Let’s talk about death.

No, seriously. It’s time we all had a conversation with our loved ones about dying.

Flickr Photo/Alex Holzknecht (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8E7xgJ

Seattle was recently named the most "hygge" city in the United States. Hygge is a way of life that has been imported from Denmark. It essentially means coziness.

To combat the long, dark nights of winter, a hygge practice would include lighting your fireplace, filling a room with candles, reading cuddled up in a blanket, spending time with friends, drinking lots of wine and eating lots of cake.

Statue in the Monumental Cemetery of Staglieno in Genoa, Italy.
Flickr Photo/Alexander Edward (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/atrV5j

Matt Calkins was in junior high when he first started feeling intense social anxiety.

"I remember I would go on high school debate trips and I wouldn't say a word for like three days until I was actually debating," he said, speaking with Bill Radke on KUOW's The Record.

Flickr Photo/ sharkhats (CC BY-NC 2.0)/ https://flic.kr/p/qFaSB8

Bill Radke talks to aerospace and science editor for Geekwire, Alan Boyle, about some mysterious bursts of radio waves coming from three billion light-years away and what he explains what you should do if you find see bits of a space lab falling from the sky

Olympia Washington State Legislature
Flickr Photo/Harvey Barrison (CC BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks to Washington state Sen. Schoesler (R-Ritzville), about issues that will arise in the state legislature in the 2018 session. 

Deputy Chief Carmen Best, left, and Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole listen as mayor Jenny Durkan speaks during a press conference on Monday, December 4, 2017, at Seattle City Hall.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to The Seattle Times criminal justice reporter Steve Miletich about U.S. District Judge James Robart's ruling that found the Seattle Police Department was in full and effective compliance with the court ordered reforms. 

Washington State Capitol
Flickr Photo/Alan Cordova (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks to Hayat Norimine, associate editor for Seattle Met's PubliCola, about a bill in the state legislature that would remove the statute of limitation on felony sex offenses. Right now victims in our state only have three years to pursue charges after a crime happens, or ten years if they reported the crime to the police in the first year after the crime was committed. This is one of the shortest statute of limitations for rape in the country. 

Department of Natural Resources estimates that the landslide volume is approximately 4 million cubic yards and covers an area of about 20 acres.
Washington State Department of Natural Resources

Bill Radke talks to David Montgomery, professor of geology at the University of Washington, about the crack in Rattlesnake Ridge and what geologist and state officials are looking for as they monitor the slow moving slide.  

Boxed items are shown on conveyer belts leading to docks where they will be loaded onto trucks at an Amazon fulfillment center on Friday, November 3, 2017, in Kent.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Peter Goodman, the European economics correspondent for The New York Times, about why workers in Sweden are not worried about robots replacing their jobs. And we hear from Carolyn Adolph and Joshua McNichols about how robots are changing the way humans work at Amazon and what the economic future of our country might be as more jobs are replaced by artificial intelligence and automation.

Photo courtesy of Mitchell Frimodt

Bill Radke talks to Mitchell Frimodt, University of Washington junior and director of the UWashington Hyperloop team about the Hyperloop pod the team has built to compete in SpaceX Hyperloop Pod Competition in California. Since 2015 SpaceX has held a global competition with the hopes of speeding up the development of the hyperspeed train-like transportation system. 

But before you get excited at the idea of traveling at hyperspeed, Mark Hallenbeck, the director of the Washington State Transportation Center at the University of Washington explains why Hyperloop probably isn't coming to the Northwest anytime soon. 

Former Mayor Ed Murray at a press conference in the University District in September 2016.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke talks to Seattle Times reporter Lewis Kamb about how the city of Seattle came to settle the lawsuit filed against former mayor Ed Murray and why it will pay $150,000 to the man accusing Murray of raping and molesting him as a teenager. 

A North Korean soldier looks at the southern side through a pair of binoculars at the border village of Panmunjom, north of Seoul, Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2003.
AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

Bill Radke talks to Elizabeth Saunders, an associate professor of political science at George Washington University, about the exchanges between President Trump and Kim Jong Un, diplomacy and the threat of nuclear war

Photo Courtesy of the U.S. Department of Energy

Marcie Sillman talks to Anna King, Northwest News Network's Richland correspondent, about the radioactive contamination that was found on six workers and fourteen cars around the Plutonium Finishing Plant in Richland Washington. 

Congressman Paul Ryan of Wisconsin speaking at CPAC 2011 in Washington, D.C.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/cVEJJh

Jeannie Yandel talks to Gary Grimstad, local accountant and part time lecturer in the University of Washington Foster School of Business about how the new GOP tax plan will impact Washington residents. 

Seattle skyline
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Ross Reynolds talks to Zaki Hamid, a program director for Humanities Washington, about why he calls Seattle home and what has kept him here. And we  take calls from listeners who share their stories of how they make it work in the changing region. 

A toll area on Interstate 405.
Flickr Photo/SounderBruce (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ruiWYC

Bill Radke talks to Ed Barry, the Toll Division Director with the Washington State Department of Transportation, about a new report (PDF) that recommends raising the price of the top toll on Interstate 405 past $10.

It was one of a series of recommendations to keep traffic flowing on the busy corridor.  WSDOT has also conducted a study analyzing the effectiveness of I-405 tolling as the population in the region continues to grow. 

Adra Boo and Jen Petersen talk about leaving and staying in Seattle
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks with Jen Petersen and Adra Boo about their respective decisions to leave Seattle (and the United States) and stay in the Puget Sound region. They reflect on what's changed and what hasn't and whether Seattle is living up to its progressive ideals. 

Seattle writer Ijeoma Oluo
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke talks to Laura Kipnis, author of the book "Unwanted Advances," and Ijeoma Oluo, Seattle writer and editor at large of the Establishment, about  power, behavior and how you change the culture around sexual harassment. 

Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole, left, and Deputy Chief Carmen Best listen as mayor Jenny Durkan speaks during a press conference on Monday, December 4, 2017, at Seattle City Hall.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to state Representative Morgan Irwin and Michele Storms, Deputy Director of the ACLU of Washington about what they hope to see in the next Seattle police chief. 

Seattle Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole, left, and Deputy Chief Carmen Best listen as mayor Jenny Durkan speaks during a press conference on Monday, December 4, 2017, at Seattle City Hall.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Kirsten Harris-Talley, former Seattle City Councilmember about what she hopes to see in the next police chief of the Seattle Police Department. 

Bill Radke talks to the New York Times' Gender Editor Jessica Bennett about the fact that so many of the high-profile men who have been accused of workplace sexual harassment and assault also decided what stories we all had access to, from movies and TV to news coverage. Bennett has been writing about this in her newsletter for the NYT, The #MeTooMoment.  

Supporters and protestors clash during a pro-Trump rally at Westlake Plaza in downtown Seattle on Monday, May 1, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Mike Kane

Bill Radke talks to Judy Giesberg, history professor at Villanova University and editor of Journal of the Civil War Era, and David Blight, history professor at Yale University, about the Civil War and whether today's political climate, while divided, is anywhere near the brink of another war.  

Bill Radke talks to Dr. Sam Sharar, professor in the Department of Anesthesiology at the University of Washington, about how doctors are using virtual reality to manage burn treatment pain. 

Nathan Cultee dumps 16 farm-raised Atlantic salmon into a container on Tuesday, August 22, 2017, at Home Port Seafood in Bellingham.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Lynda Mapes, environment reporter for The Seattle Times, about where all of the nearly 100,000 escaped Atlantic salmon went and what lawmakers in Olympia plan to do about it. 

The theater revised its number of seats down from 798 to 570. The seats are leather and offer enough leg room for an average size adult woman to fully extend her legs (claim tested).
KUOW Photo/Posey Gruener

Bill Radke talks to Dominique Cantwell, executive director of Bainbridge Performing Arts, and Warren Etheredge, curator of  Walla Walla Movie Crush and former programmer for the Seattle International Film Festival, about how they decide, as gatekeepers for arts organizations, when to cut ties with national artists who have been accused of assault and when to showcase their work. 

Facebook
Flickr Photo/Franco Bouly (CC BY ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/6rk2Qf

Bill Radke talks to Anna Lauren Hoffmann, associate professor at the University of Washington's Information School, about the implications of Facebook's idea to stop revenge porn and nude pictures from circulating on their site. 

From left, James Marx, Carrie Howell, Robin Mueller and Haley Ballast write letters of support after a flier from the group Respect Washington circulated Burien, on Monday, October 30, 2017, in Burien.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to KUOW's immigration reporter Liz Jones about a letter that was mailed to some residents in Burien that listed the names and addresses of people who were accused of committing crimes and believed to be undocumented residents. 

KUOW PHOTO/ Kara McDermott

Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien is one of the lawmakers proposing to study the idea of tolling -- not just 520 or Highway 99, but Seattle surface streets, too. The new waterfront tunnel is going to have a toll. That toll will cause some drivers to spill onto our already-crowded surface streets and congestion pricing could help with that, but is it the only way to ease downtown traffic?

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