Amina Al-Sadi | KUOW News and Information

Amina Al-Sadi

Producer, The Record

Ways to Connect

KUOW PHOTO/KRISTIN LEONG

Washington sues the Trump Administration over its policy of separating migrant families at the U.S.-Mexico border, Seattle looks for a new strategy to fund affordable housing, and the University of Washington settles a free speech case.

Plus: Summer's finally here and we're already debating air conditioning. Do you even need it in the Northwest?

A soccer ball rests, waiting to be set in motion.
Flickr Photo/Marco Verch (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/J1SG48

Bill Radke talks to Roger Bennett, co-host of the NBC Sports show "Men In Blazers" about the rise of soccer's popularity in the U.S. and the 2018 World Cup without the U.S. Men's National team. 

Caitlin Lee raises a Tax Amazon sign in front of Seattle City Council members on Monday, May 14, 2018, during a head tax vote at City Hall in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

The city of Seattle appears to be doing an about-face on the new employee head tax on businesses. The City Council approved the tax unanimously a month ago to generate money for affordable housing and homeless services.

Facebook
Flickr Photo/Franco Bouly (CC BY ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/6rk2Qf

In November Eli Sanders, associate editor of the Seattle Stranger, walked into the local offices of Facebook and Google and hand delivered a letter requesting information on political ads targeting Washington residents. Washington State law requires that information to be made public. But Facebook and Google never disclosed how much campaigns were spending on political ads here locally.

KUOW Photo/ Brie Ripley

This week the Week In Review crew took the ferry across Puget Sound to record the show in front of a live audience at the Bainbridge Island Museum of Art. We talked about the region's growing pains and whether Jeff Bezos' idea to colonize space is a good one or not (spoiler, the crowd thought not). Also, how effective will Starbuck's racial bias training be and what the end of Roseanne means?

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle is a growing city. Roads have gotten more congested, trails more crowded and housing prices have been on a steady climb up.  So what brings people into the city, and once they are here, why do they stay? 

The cougar who killed SJ Brooks while they were mountain biking over the weekend.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Two Seattle residents were biking near the Cascade foothills this weekend when a cougar attacked them. 

Photo courtsey of NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

Pluto has long been misunderstood. In 2006 it was declared 'not a planet.' A decision planetary scientist Dr. Alan Stern calls B.S. (bad science).

Seattleites packed a City Hall meeting on Monday, where a vote on the contentious head tax was expected.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

A compromise has been struck over the controversial proposed Head Tax by the Seattle City Council. Over the weekend Councilmember Lorena Gonzalez worked with Mayor Jenny Durkan to come up with a plan they could both support. The new plan would raise an estimated $50 million a year instead of the original $75 million.

File photo of a homeless encampment under a bridge.
KUOW Photo

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan is not ready to support the proposed employee head tax. This is the proposal for a per-employee tax on the city's highest grossing businesses.

The money would pay for low-income housing and services for homeless people. Amazon would be the number one payer of this tax and they are so opposed to it that they've halted construction on a new tower in Downtown Seattle. Also opposed to this head tax are local companies like Starbucks, Alaska Airlines and Dick's Drive-In.

KUOW photo/Amina Al-Sadi

We've heard the jokes on late night about President Donald Trump taking on dictator-like qualities. But what is comedy really like under an authoritarian regime?

A group of people jog across Lenora Street, on Thursday, October 5, 2017, in front of Amazon's biodomes, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Would a tax credit that encourages businesses to donate to social services be more effective in solving the city's affordability and homelessness crisis than a new head tax?

Bill Radke talks to Saul Spady, president of Cre8ive Empowerment (and grandson of Dick's Drive-In co-founder Dick Spady) about why he and other area business owners are against the proposed Seattle employee head tax.

KUOW PHOTO/ Gil Aegerter

Bill Radke talks to actor Alan Cumming about home, becoming American, identity and learning to let go.

Flickr Photo/Curtis Cronn (CC BY-NC-ND)

In the next couple of years the Alaskan Way Viaduct will be torn down and the Seattle waterfront will open up in a whole new way. Gone will be the elevated highway that separates Pike Place Market from the Ferris wheel and aquarium. In its place will be a new, large, waterfront park. But who should pay for that park? The property owners who live around it? Or all the people who will be benefiting from the new public space? 

PHOTO Courtesy of Deirdre Visser

Bill Radke talks to Bellingham artist Jenna Bean Veatch about her event 'The Not-Creepy Gathering for People Who Are Single and Want to Fall in Love' and why she believes in finding ways for people to move beyond surface level small talk and swiping right to find deeper connections. 

Sunny Jansma  of Seattle takes photos of rows of yellow tulips on Tuesday, April 24, 2018, at RoozenGaarde near Mount Vernon.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Is there really a heat wave in Seattle in the middle of April? Bill Radke talks to KOMO News Meteorologist Scott Sistek about the mini heatwave and what you can expect for the rest of spring. Also, if you want to take advantage of the good weather there are a few things you should keep in mind before adventuring into the wilderness. Fitz Cahall, the creator of the outdoor podcast Dirtbag Diaries is here to tell you how to best take advantage of the outdoors. 

A scene from a simulation by the Washington State Department of Transportation of what could happen if a massive earthquake hits the Alaskan Way Viaduct.
YouTube/WSDOT

There will be a time — it could be tomorrow, it could be 100 years from now —when the ground beneath us will start to shake.

Buildings will crumble. Roads will be destroyed. And then a 60-foot wall of water will crash onto the Washington coast line.

Former Seattle Mayor Tim Burgess, King County Executive Dow Constantine and Deputy Executive Rhonda Berry at a press conference announcing the intent to move youth detention oversight to Public Health Seattle King County.
KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

Bill Radke talks to Nikkita Oliver, Seattle attorney and organizer with No New Youth Jail Coalition about why community organizers and activists want the county to re-think the building of a new multi-million dollar youth detention center and instead redistribute the money to more community services. 

Flickr Photo/MicrosoftPDC (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8NHryn

Bill Radke talks to the former CEO of Microsoft, Steve Ballmer about the results of his data initiative that takes numbers provided by the U.S. government to track everything from demographic shifts to the financial stability of the country. 

KUOW PHOTO / BRIE RIPLEY

This week, Mark Zuckerberg went to Washington and answered lawmaker's questions about Facebook. What it is, how it works, and what we should do about it?

Photo Courtesy of Penguin Random House

Marcie Sillman talks to author Michael Finkel about the story of Christopher Knight, a man who lived the life of a hermit for 27 years before he was caught by police in Maine for stealing from the community of North Creek. 

Spokane Republican Cathy McMorris Rodgers says the current Republican health care bill is only part of a larger plan.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e4kQ16

Marcie Sillman talks to Doug Nadvornick, reporter and program director for Spokane Public Radio about a new Elway poll that shows a close race for incumbent Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers. The new poll shows McMorris Rodgers with a six point lead over Democrat Lisa Brown. 

Author Lindy West lives in Seattle.
Photo by Jenny Jimenez / http://photojj.com

Following the #MeToo movement, men say they're having a difficult time interacting with women in the workplace. That's according to a new Pew Research Center survey. New York Times columnist Lindy West calls B.S. on that — and has some tips for men at work. 

Todd Bishop and KUOW's Bill Radke geek out over nausea-free virtual reality in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

You walk briskly into an airport. You're running late. You need to know your departure gate. But that board! That big board with all the flight information that's not your flight. You have to squint and scan while the security line gets longer and longer. Well what if that board only displayed your flight information? And that guy standing behind you? He looks at the board and only sees his flight information.

Boeing’s Shared Services Group (SSG) is set to move to the southwest state by 2020.
Flickr Photo/Chuck Taylor (CC BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/7C1E9w

Bill Radke talks to Andrew McIntosh, aerospace reporter for The Puget Sound Business Journal, about the effect China's new tariffs will have on Boeing and the Puget Sound area's aerospace community. 

Photo courtesy of Kit Kovacs of Norwegian Polar Institute

Bill Radke talks to Dr. Kate Stafford, University of Washington Oceanographer, about her latest study on the songs bowhead whales sing and why they are surprisingly more varied than other whales. 

The George Washington statue on the University of Washington Seattle campus.
Flickr Photo/Chris Blakeley (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1jEzCcs

Bill Radke talks to historian, author and former This American Life contributor Sarah Vowell about America's troubled history and how it can better help us understand today. 

Ricky Garcia and Lauren Davis are fighting to pass Ricky's Law in the Washington State Legislature that would allow involuntary committment for addicts.
Courtesy of Lauren Davis

If someone you love wants to hurt themselves, what can you do? If the underlying cause is mental illness, one option is to have them involuntarily committed for psychiatric treatment. But if the underlying cause is addiction, that was not an option until the passage of Ricky's Law in 2016.

Ricky Garcia and Lauren Davis worked with state lawmakers to pass a bill that would let someone in Washington state involuntarily commit an addict who is found to be a danger to him or herself.  Bill Radke brings Davis back into the studio for an update on the implementation of the law, which took effect Monday. 

Photo Courtesy of FBI Records

In the early 2000s ten Russian nationals were living normal lives in the United States. They went to school, got jobs, and tried to infiltrate the inner circles of U.S. policymakers and businesses to send information back to Russia.

Bill Radke talks to Melanie McFarland, TV critic at Salon about the new reboot of Roseanne and what it says about America today. 

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