Amina Al-Sadi | KUOW News and Information

Amina Al-Sadi

Producer, The Record

Ways to Connect

A scene from a simulation by the Washington State Department of Transportation of what could happen if a massive earthquake hits the Alaskan Way Viaduct.
YouTube/WSDOT

There will be a time — it could be tomorrow, it could be 100 years from now —when the ground beneath us will start to shake.

Buildings will crumble. Roads will be destroyed. And then a 60-foot wall of water will crash onto the Washington coast line.

Former Seattle Mayor Tim Burgess, King County Executive Dow Constantine and Deputy Executive Rhonda Berry at a press conference announcing the intent to move youth detention oversight to Public Health Seattle King County.
KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

Bill Radke talks to Nikkita Oliver, Seattle attorney and organizer with No New Youth Jail Coalition about why community organizers and activists want the county to re-think the building of a new multi-million dollar youth detention center and instead redistribute the money to more community services. 

Flickr Photo/MicrosoftPDC (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8NHryn

Bill Radke talks to the former CEO of Microsoft, Steve Ballmer about the results of his data initiative that takes numbers provided by the U.S. government to track everything from demographic shifts to the financial stability of the country. 

KUOW PHOTO / BRIE RIPLEY

This week, Mark Zuckerberg went to Washington and answered lawmaker's questions about Facebook. What it is, how it works, and what we should do about it?

Photo Courtesy of Penguin Random House

Marcie Sillman talks to author Michael Finkel about the story of Christopher Knight, a man who lived the life of a hermit for 27 years before he was caught by police in Maine for stealing from the community of North Creek. 

Spokane Republican Cathy McMorris Rodgers says the current Republican health care bill is only part of a larger plan.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e4kQ16

Marcie Sillman talks to Doug Nadvornick, reporter and program director for Spokane Public Radio about a new Elway poll that shows a close race for incumbent Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers. The new poll shows McMorris Rodgers with a six point lead over Democrat Lisa Brown. 

Author Lindy West lives in Seattle.
Photo by Jenny Jimenez / http://photojj.com

Following the #MeToo movement, men say they're having a difficult time interacting with women in the workplace. That's according to a new Pew Research Center survey. New York Times columnist Lindy West calls B.S. on that — and has some tips for men at work. 

Todd Bishop and KUOW's Bill Radke geek out over nausea-free virtual reality in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

You walk briskly into an airport. You're running late. You need to know your departure gate. But that board! That big board with all the flight information that's not your flight. You have to squint and scan while the security line gets longer and longer. Well what if that board only displayed your flight information? And that guy standing behind you? He looks at the board and only sees his flight information.

Boeing’s Shared Services Group (SSG) is set to move to the southwest state by 2020.
Flickr Photo/Chuck Taylor (CC BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/7C1E9w

Bill Radke talks to Andrew McIntosh, aerospace reporter for The Puget Sound Business Journal, about the effect China's new tariffs will have on Boeing and the Puget Sound area's aerospace community. 

Photo courtesy of Kit Kovacs of Norwegian Polar Institute

Bill Radke talks to Dr. Kate Stafford, University of Washington Oceanographer, about her latest study on the songs bowhead whales sing and why they are surprisingly more varied than other whales. 

The George Washington statue on the University of Washington Seattle campus.
Flickr Photo/Chris Blakeley (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1jEzCcs

Bill Radke talks to historian, author and former This American Life contributor Sarah Vowell about America's troubled history and how it can better help us understand today. 

Ricky Garcia and Lauren Davis are fighting to pass Ricky's Law in the Washington State Legislature that would allow involuntary committment for addicts.
Courtesy of Lauren Davis

If someone you love wants to hurt themselves, what can you do? If the underlying cause is mental illness, one option is to have them involuntarily committed for psychiatric treatment. But if the underlying cause is addiction, that was not an option until the passage of Ricky's Law in 2016.

Ricky Garcia and Lauren Davis worked with state lawmakers to pass a bill that would let someone in Washington state involuntarily commit an addict who is found to be a danger to him or herself.  Bill Radke brings Davis back into the studio for an update on the implementation of the law, which took effect Monday. 

Photo Courtesy of FBI Records

In the early 2000s ten Russian nationals were living normal lives in the United States. They went to school, got jobs, and tried to infiltrate the inner circles of U.S. policymakers and businesses to send information back to Russia.

Bill Radke talks to Melanie McFarland, TV critic at Salon about the new reboot of Roseanne and what it says about America today. 

Flickr Photo/The West End (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/fqqMid

Bill Radke talks to Naomi Tomky, Seattle food writer about a dish that she thinks is a strong contender to be Seattle's 'signature dish.' Hint: there is seafood involved. No, not geoduck. Seattle TV critic Melanie McFarland joins the conversation. 

Facebook phone
Flickr Photo/Stock Catalog (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/23qV3ca

Have you deleted your Facebook yet? Last week alarm bells were ringing as we learned about the data Facebook has on us and what they can do with it.

We found out that a British marketing company used Facebook data to build personality profiles of its users. This marketing firm, Cambridge Analytica, would sell that personality profile to politicians like Donald Trump promising that this information could win votes.

But was that ever true? Can Facebook data swing elections? Bill Radke talks with Antonio Garcia Martinez, who helped Facebook figure out how user data can point ads at you.

Bill Radke talks to Don Hellmann, professor emeritus at the University of Washington's Jackson School of International Studies about the U.S. State Department's decision to close the Russian consulate in Seattle and expel 60 Russian diplomats in response to an attack on an ex-spy for Russia in England. 

'Week in Review' panel Sydney Brownstone, Eric Liu, host Bill Radke and Joni Balter.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

You give Facebook your personal information. Facebook shares it with companies that use it against you. So what are you going to do about it?

Also President Trump signed a $1.3 trillion spending bill that included some money for Sound Transit's Lynnwood line — now if only the Seattle Streetcar project could get some of that money. Or should it? 

A group of people jog across Lenora Street, on Thursday, October 5, 2017, in front of Amazon's biodomes, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Bloomberg's Emily Chang, author of the book "Brotopia: Breaking Up The Boy's Club Of Silicon Valley," and Kristi Coulter, former Amazon employee and writer of the upcoming book "Nothing Good Can Come From This," about how the sometimes misogynistic and aggressive work culture in places like Silicon Valley shuts women out of the booming tech industry. 

Computer technology keyboard
Flickr Photo/Anonymous Account (CC BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1Zj35Hj

Let's travel to the future for a moment and step inside a fish and chips joint for some lunch. Inside - the manager is planning a new promotional campaign. She's thinking of who's coming in, and what they want to eat. And she's doing it using Big Data.

Homeless RV
Flickr Photo/A. Kwanten (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/Bv6MSo

Bill Radke talks to Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien about a King County superior court ruling that says the city can not impound a vehicle if a person is using it for shelter in the city of Seattle.

King County Metro bus
Flickr Photo/clappstar (CC BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks to Seattle Times reporter Paige Cornwell about her reporting on dogs on King County Metro buses. 

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Fantasy author Tamora Pierce has inspired young people for decades with her stories about strong girls who do things like disguise themselves as boys so they can defend their kingdoms as knights. Among her inspired readers was a young Lindy West, now a New York Times columnist.

We invited West to interview Pierce at KUOW.


KUOW Photo/ Gil Aegerter

Bill Radke spoke with Dyer Oxley, co-host of the NW Nerd podcast, and TyTy, a Northwest cosplayer and the creator of Lead by Example Apparel, about what goes into the creation of costumes worn in cosplay.

Flickr Photo/Travis Wise (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/JxipYN

Bill Radke talks to Phillip Chavira, the executive director of Intiman Theatre in Seattle, and Marcie Sillman, KUOW's arts and culture reporter, about the musical "Hamilton" and why it resonates with audiences.

Tinder date sign
Flickr Photo/Chris Goldberg (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ptjdAP

Deborah Wang talks to Susie Lee, the Seattle-based founder and CEO of the online dating app Siren, about the history of computer facilitated dating. 

Flickr Photo/Andreas Eldh (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Samuel Woolley, director of the Digital Intelligence Lab at the Institute of the Future, about how social media bots have influenced and driven conversations online and what can be done to stop the flow of disinformation. 

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

In the early 1990s, Carmen Best was working as an accountant for a local insurance company when she saw a recruitment ad for the Seattle Police Department.

“I just wanted to do something different, try something out," she told Bill Radke. "Had no preconceived ideas about staying for a long time, or not staying, just thought I would give it a shot and see what happens.” 

Police officers form a line on Saturday, Feb. 10, 2018, outside of a College Republicans rally at Red Square on the University of Washington campus in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Seattle University communication professor Caitlin Carlson about the tension between protecting free speech on campus and protecting the rights of students, faculty and staff. 

Protesters crowd into the University of Washington's Red Square on Friday, January 20, 2017 during a speech by Breitbart editor Milo Yiannopoulos.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Last year the University of Washington's College Republicans invited former Breitbart editor Milo Yiannopoulos to campus. Yiannopoulos is a conservative and provocative speaker whose speeches and rallies often draw protests. The night he spoke at the University of Washington those protests turned violent.

This year when the College Republicans decided to hold a rally with the Patriot Prayer group, the university told them to pay a $17,000 security fee.

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