Amina Al-Sadi | KUOW News and Information

Amina Al-Sadi

Producer, The Record

Ways to Connect

Seattle Police Department patch.
Facebook Photo/Seattle Police Officers Guild

Bill Radke talks to Seattle City Councilmember Tim Burgess and president of the Seattle Police Union Kevin Stuckey about how contract negotiations are affecting the progress of police reform. The union claims that they are being steamrolled while the city contends the union is being selfish.  

Workers and labor activists demonstrate outside the U.S. District Courthouse in support of the city's $15 an hour minimum wage
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Bill Radke talks to Paul Basken, science policy reporter for the Chronicle of Higher Education, about how we should consume news that reports on scientific research. 

Alice in Chains at Molson Amphitheatre in Toronto, Ontario, September 18, 2010. Alice In Chains' music is being considered for the musical Seattle Repertory Theatre is commissioning
Flickr Photo/cb2vi3 (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8EgV6r

Bill Radke talks to Sean Nelson and Gretta Harley about the idea of a grunge musical. The Seattle Repertory Theatre has commissioned an original musical that features the music and story of Seattle's 1990s music scene. Nelson is editor at large for The Stranger and Harley is a Seattle musician who co-wrote the rock music play, "These Streets," which ran at ACT in 2013.

People pack city hall for a hearing on a proposed income tax
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Bill Radke talks to Seattle resident and software engineer Ashok Chandwaney about why he supports a Seattle income tax that he would eventually need to pay.

Michelle DeLappe, Seattle tax attorney with the law firm Garvey Schubert Barer, says the tax passed by the Seattle City Council is illegal and she would love to help take the case up in court. 

Bill Radke talks to Lauren Berliner, assistant professor of media and communication and culture studies at the University of Washington Bothell, and Nora Kenworthy, assistant professor in the school of nursing and health studies at the University of Washington Bothell, about their study on the rise of the use of crowdfunding sites as a way to pay for medical bills

KUOW Photo/ Megan Farmer

In February of 2016 Andre Taylor was in L.A. when he got a phone call from his stepmom in Seattle.

She told him his little brother Che Taylor had been shot by the police. Che Taylor was standing next to the open door of a car. The two officers said he was reaching for a gun when they fired.

Officer John Hill and Ryan Miles, a designated mental health professional with the Tacoma Police Department.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Could Charleena Lyles still be alive today if police had not gone to her apartment alone? 

In Tacoma, an officer can call for help dealing with someone who might be mentally ill. They can call a mental health co-responder. And now, this co-responder program might go statewide.

KUOW’s Bill Radke speaks with Tacoma Patrol Officer John Hill and a mental health co-responder who works with officers – Ryan Miles.

Summer Stinson, lawyer and Vice President of Washington's Paramount Duty and Daniel Zavala, director of policy and government relations with the League of Education Voters.
KUOW Photo/ Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Summer Stinson, lawyer and vice president of  the parent group Washington's Paramount Duty, and Daniel Zavala, director of policy and government relations with the League of Education Voters, about the end of the latest legislative session and how much closer lawmakers got to fully funding basic education. 

Flickr Photo/Tony Swartz (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Bill Radke talks to Joseph O'Sullivan, Seattle Times Olympia reporter, about the latest information on the state budget deal that Republicans and Democrats reached on Wednesday. 

The Washington state Capitol in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/amishrobot (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/4PxvK4

Bill Radke talks to Olympia correspondent Austin Jenkins about the budget deal reached by lawmakers just in time to avoid a partial government shutdown. 

KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Ijeoma Oluo, editor at large of The Establishment, and Eula Scott Bynoe, co-host of HellaBlackHellaSeattle, about the conversations they've been having in the wake of the shooting of Charleena Lyles. 

Houses in Queen Anne
Flickr Photo/Harold Hollingsworth (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9C1rMq

Bill Radke talks to Denise Rodriguez, the deputy director of Washington Homeownership Resource Center, and Skylar Olsen, a senior economist at Zillow, about what makes the Puget Sound real estate market so competitive and how people are able to find and afford housing. 

Washington Insurance Commissioner Mike Kreidler
Flickr photo/Washington State Office of the Insurance Commissioner (CC BY-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/K52qFP

Bill Radke talks to Mike Kreidler, insurance commissioner for Washington state, about the numbers released on insurance premiums for plans in the health care insurance exchange. 

Washington state GOP chair Susan Hutchison on the floor of the Republican convention in Cleveland in 2016.
KUOW PHOTO/DAVID HYDE

Bill Radke talks Susan Hutchison, the chairman of the Washington State Republican Party, about how national issues play locally with the Republican base. 

Bill Radke talks to Peg Coleman, who runs the Domestic Abuse Women's Network, about why so many mass shooters have a history of domestic violence and what we miss when domestic violence isn't in the conversation around mass violence. 

Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Bill Radke talks to Seattle City Councilmember Mike O'Brien about why he sponsored a resolution saying Seattle will uphold the Paris Climate Agreement and how city leaders can get the city to reduce its carbon footprint. 

The Watergate building in Washington D.C.
Flickr Photo/Rudi Riet (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/2FEW1m

Bill Rakde talks to Joseph Janes, associate professor in the University of Washington Information School, about why he includes the 18 and a half minutes of static recording from the Nixon tapes in his new book "Documents that Changed the Way We Live."

You can hear his podcast Documents that Changed the World.

Seven Gabels Theatre in Seattle's University District
Flickr Photo/ javacolleen (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/ https://flic.kr/p/31fDJf

Bill Radke talks to KUOW arts reporter Marcie Sillman and Sean Nelson, arts and music editor at The Stranger, about the closing of two Landmark movie theaters in Seattle, Guild 45th and Seven Gables Theatre.  

Cassie Chinn is the Deputy Executive Director of the Wing Luke Museum and Tam Nguyen is the owner of Tamarind Tree in Chinatown-International District
KUOW Photo/ Amina Al-Sadi

Bill Radke talks to Cassie Chinn, deputy executive director of the Wing Luke Museum, and Tam Nguyen, the owner of Tamarind Tree, about how Chinatown-International District is changing and what might be lost as the area faces the pressure of new development.  

Courtesy of the Seattle Art Museum and Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo/Singapore; Victoria Miro, London; David Zwirner, New York, © YAYOI KUSAMA, Photo: Cathy Carver

Bill Radke talks to KUOW arts reporter Marcie Sillman and Crosscut managing editor Florangela Davila  about two Seattle art events that change the way you experience art. Seattle Art Museum will host the popular Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors exhibit in June and the Seattle Repertory Theatre's production of "Here Lies Love" has been extended another three weeks. 

Flickr Photo/Steven Santiago (CC-BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/q4dpg6

Bill Radke and Monica Guzman, co-founder of the Seattle newsletter The Evergrey, take calls from listeners about moving to Seattle, expectations vs. reality and the question of when do you become a local.  

Lorena Gonzalez at her election night party on Nov. 3, 2015, in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Jeannie Yandel talks to Seattle City Councilmember Lorena Gonzalez about the legislation the City Council passed that will increase civilian oversight of the Seattle Police Department. 

Snoqualmie Falls is waterfall on the Snoqualmie River between Snoqualmie and Fall City, Washington, USA. As featured in the opening credits of Twin Peaks.
Flickr Photo/Tjflex2 (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/TK9yay

Bill Radke talks to David Schmader, Seattle writer and author of the book "Weed: A User's Guide," and Leah Baltus, editor in chief of City Arts magazine, about the return of Twin Peaks, the show's impact on TV and culture, and how the new season lives up to the past two so far. 

President Donald Trump at speaking at the 2017 Conservative Political Action Conference in February.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/SfGqf1

Bill Radke talks to Phil Ewing, NPR's National Security editor, about the latest in the investigation into the Trump campaign's connections to Russia in the 2016 election.  

Photos courtesy of John Nowak/CNN

W. Kamau Bell remembers the first time he encountered blatant racism — which until then seemed like an outdated concept his mom talked about. He was 15 years old and shopping at Rose Records in Chicago when a store security officer threw him (literally) out into the street.

President Donald Trump
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/9hKraP

Bill Radke talks to Jill Dougherty, a distinguished visiting practitioner at the University of Washington Evans School and former CNN Russia correspondent and Moscow Bureau Chief, about the latest news from the White House regarding how President Trump handled classified information in his meeting with Russian officials. 

Flickr Photo/KUOW 94.9 Public Radio (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/5cnLsE

Bill Radke talks to James Skwarok, the Victoria-based school teacher who dressed up as a giant brown poop for 13 years to protest Victoria's lack of a sewage treatment center. They talk about humor in protesting and why he's retiring the character. 

US Congress
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Bill Radke talks to Margot Sanger-Katz, The New York Times reporter who covers health care for The Upshot, about the health care bill that passed the House and what happens next. 

Drivers wait to cross Mercer Street
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Bill Radke talks to Chris Long, the traffic engineering manager with the city of Bellevue, about adaptive traffic lights and how they can change the flow of traffic in busy areas. 

People walk in the May Day labor march in Seattle on Friday, May 1, 2015.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Bill Radke talks to Eli Sanders, associate editor for the Stranger, about May Day protests — from the traditional immigrants' rights and workers' rights march that has taken place for the last 18 years to the more recent marches lead by anarchists.  

Sanders wrote about the antigovernment protesters and May Day last year in the Stranger.

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