Alison Bruzek | KUOW News and Information

Alison Bruzek

Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2018

Ways to Connect

Seattle police officers observe marchers moving down 4th Avenue during the Black Lives Matter rally in Seattle, Saturday April 15, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Daniel Berman

Seattle is down to the final three contenders for Seattle Police chief. Mayor Jenny Durkan has said she will announce the appointee this month.

Kyana Wheeler and Robin DiAngelo
KUOW Photo/Alison Bruzek

Robin DiAngelo has studied issues of racial and social justice and whiteness for decades. Her new book is, "White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism."

U.S. Rep. Rick Larsen of Washington state's 2nd District.
U.S. government

Bill Radke talks to Congressman Rick Larsen, who serves on the House Armed Services Committee, about why the NATO alliance is still relevant. He says the Baltic states need the alliance as protection from Russia and they need the U.S. to lead NATO.

Robots at the Science Museum
Flickr Photo/Paul Hudson (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/Vk7Zr3

Bill Radke talks to two roboticists about bringing robots into the home, deep into the sea, and out into space. We're joined by Sidd Srinivasa, professor in the Paul Allen School of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington, and Howard Chizeck, co-director of the UW Biorobotics Laboratory.

Newspapers in black and white
Flickr Photo/Jon S (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ayGkBN

Bill Radke talks to University of Washington Professors Jevin West and Carl Bergstrom. Together they teach a course at UW titled, "Calling bullshit: Data reasoning in a digital world." We first spoke to West when the class kicked off. Now they're back with how they're adjusting to fake news in social media and what they've learned from students, one year in.

Key Arena is home court for Sue Bird, a 9 time WNBA All-Star
Seattle Storm

On Sunday night, Seattle Storm point guard Sue Bird smashed through the team's all-time leading scorer record. She put up 21 points against the Mystics. She's also the all-time assist leader for the WNBA. Bird spoke to Bill Radke about setting the new record and why she prefers making an assist to scoring a basket.

Hannah Gadsby in Nanette
Courtesy of Netflix/Ben King

Bill Radke talks about the Netflix stand-up comedy special, "Nanette," in which comic Hannah Gadsby says she's leaving comedy. "I built a career out of self-depreciation," she says, "And I don't want to do that anymore." We talk about comedy as resistance.

Fuca Pillar at Cape Flattery, the northwest extremity of the Olympic Peninsula. Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, Washington.
Flickr Photo/NOAA Photo Library (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/8D9zXL

Bill Radke talks to Jenny Waddell, research coordinator at the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary. She was on the exploration ship that went hunting for a meteorite on Monday. The team livestreamed the mission. It was the first ever to search for a meteorite in the ocean.

Jenny Durkan
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan joins Bill Radke in studio to answer listener questions. We talk about the education levy on the ballot this November, next year's budget, the streetcar delay, her fondness for the U.S. Navy Blue Angels, and the city's homelessness crisis.

Maria Cantwell
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Justice Anthony Kennedy is set to retire at the end of July. President Trump is expected to name his nominee next week, but Senator Maria Cantwell said the process shouldn't be rushed.

Protesters occupy the sidewalk and into the street during the Solidarity Day protest outside of the Federal Detention Center in SeaTac.
Daniel Berman for KUOW

Bill Radke talks to our panelists about the 'Familes Belong Together' protests across the country over the weekend, including the rally at the SeaTac Federal Detention Center. We also discuss what the end of the Sasquatch music festival means for the city's arts scene, and if the City of Seattle's app should be used to report homeless encampments.

Display with system code.
Flickr Photo/Yuri Samoilov (CC BY 2.0)/https://bit.ly/2N9a7jN

Bill Radke talks to Stuart Reges, principal lecturer at the University of Washington's Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science about his essay, "Why Women Don't Code," saying women are underrepresented in computer science because of personal preferences. We're also joined by Nicole Buchanan, executive director of Ada Developers Academy.

In our conversation, Reges and Buchanan discuss what they see as the factors that do or do not lead women to go into computer science and tech, and the work they're both doing to bring women into the field and ensure they're supported.

The OUT@Comcast team members and friends marching in the 2017 Seattle Pride Parade, by Stephen Wong.
Flickr Photo/Comcast Washington State (CC BY 2.0)/https://bit.ly/2twwHdW

Bill Radke looks at the controversy over the restaurant that asked White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders to leave. We also talk about the commercialization of Seattle's Pride Parade. Should the event go back to its political roots?

Flickr Photo/Howard Ignatius (CC BY 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/nZ4Mz1

In honor of the summer solstice, we asked listeners about their favorite summer songs. You came through with the nostalgic, the playful, and some truly excellent 80s throwbacks. 


Washington Governor Jay Inslee.
Facebook Photo/Governor Jay Inslee

Governor Jay Inslee announced that Washington state is suing the Trump Administration over the family separation policy. Ross Reynolds asked him what that means, when the policy seems to be changing daily.

"We have demonstrated time and time again that this rogue and chaotic administration needs to have the semblance of order and fairness and equity that is given to us by the protection of the judicial system," said Governor Inslee, referring to the state's other lawsuits.

Rep. Derek Kilmer
United States Congress

Bill Radke talks to Congressman Derek Kilmer about the bills up for vote in the House this week, and the new bill introduced by Democrats to address the problem of separating migrant children from their families at the border. We also talk with Domenico Montanaro, NPR lead political editor, about the likelihood that any of these bills pass.

Boxed items are shown on conveyer belts leading to docks where they will be loaded onto trucks at an Amazon fulfillment center on Friday, November 3, 2017, in Kent.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to Geekwire's Todd Bishop about three tech giants that have faced controversy over their contracts with law enforcement and government: Amazon, Microsoft, and Google.

L122, one of the newest members of the Southern Resident Community of orcas, spotted Sept. 7 near Sooke, British Columbia.
Dave Ellifrit/Center for Whale Research

Bill Radke talks with our panel about the declining number of orcas in Puget Sound and if we should stop whale watching. We also look at the New York Times investigation into pregnancy discrimination, and why the World Health Organization has added "gaming disorder" to its disease classifications.

Mike McGinn, Bill Radke, Joni Balter, and Rob McKenna at KUOW
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

This week, it was off with the head tax. The Seattle City Council voted to repeal the employee tax just weeks after unanimously voting to instate it. Meanwhile, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Washington state tribes, forcing the state government to replace hundreds more culverts to save the salmon. And we found out this week the federal prison at SeaTac Airport is currently holding more than 170 women seeking asylum.

Bill Radke makes sense of those stories and more of the week's news with Joni Balter, host of Civic Cocktail on the Seattle Channel, Mike McGinn, former mayor of Seattle, and Rob McKenna, former Washington state attorney general.

Head tax opponents and supporters crowd Seattle City Hall on Tuesday, June 12, 2018.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke talks to two businesses that opposed the head tax about what solutions they're hoping to see, now that the head tax has been repealed. What do Seattle businesses need to do now? What's their responsibility?

Caitlin Lee raises a Tax Amazon sign in front of Seattle City Council members on Monday, May 14, 2018, during a head tax vote at City Hall in Seattle.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

The city of Seattle appears to be doing an about-face on the new employee head tax on businesses. The City Council approved the tax unanimously a month ago to generate money for affordable housing and homeless services.

Anthony Bourdain during the Peabody interview for "Parts Unknown."
Flickr Photo/Peabody Awards (CC BY 2.0)/https://bit.ly/2sVduTd

Bill Radke remembers chef and TV host Anthony Bourdain with our panel, Andrea Otanez, journalist and lecturer in journalism and and communications at the University of Washington, and, Hsiao-Ching Chou, former food editor at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer and author of the cookbook, "Chinese Soul Food: A Friendly Guide For Homemade Dumplings, Stir Fries, Soups and More."

Seatte police
KUOW / Ashley Ahearn

Bill Radke asked our panel what they want to see in Seattle's next police chief.

LMN Architects worked on the Seattle Central Library project.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

Bill Radke talks to our panel about the trademark fight over using the word 'cocky' in a romance novel title and the kickoff of pride month. We also ask, should the Seattle Public Library drop its overdue book fines for everyone? The library collected more than $1 million in overdue fees and fines in 2017. It currently offers a one-time amnesty, "Fresh Start" program for teens.

Carmen Best, interim police chief of Seattle
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Bill Radke reviews the news of the weekend, including the controversy over the three finalists chosen for Seattle's next police chief. Interim Police Chief Carmen Best is not among them.

Kim Il-sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea
Flickr Photo/Gabriel Britto (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)/https://bit.ly/2KU1mYZ

Ross Reynolds talks to Don Hellmann, professor emeritus at the Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington, about what happens now that President Trump has pulled out of the June summit with North Korea. The move comes after North Korea issued a statement emphasizing their own arsenal and calling Vice President Mike Pence a "political dummy."

Rep. Rick Larsen speaks to the Everett (Wash.) Rotary in the Grand Vista Ballroom of Naval Station Everett in late August 2011.
Wikimedia Commons/Guroadrunner (CC0)/https://bit.ly/2KOGPoJ

Bill Radke talks to Congressman Rick Larsen, who broke with fellow Democrats yesterday to vote for a partial rollback of Dodd-Frank banking regulations. The regulations were originally put in place after the Great recession, to help stop the banking abuses that contributed to the recession. No other Washington state Democrat voted in favor of the rollback, but all the state's Republicans did.

Marco Collins, Bill Radke and Karen Mason-Blair at KUOW
KUOW Photo/Brie Ripley

Pearl Jam is coming to Safeco Field this summer. Ichiro is back with the Mariners. Sea-Tac Airport plays a message from Sir Mix-A-Lot. Is it fair to say that Seattle can't get over the 90s? We look at a Seattle Met article that asks, "Why can't Seattle quit the '90s?" Who are the city's cultural icons of today?

Bill Radke asks Seattle DJ Marco Collins and grunge photographer Karen Mason Blair. Also restaurateur Tom Douglas joins us to weigh in on his position as an icon of the 1990s.

An adult mountain lion
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife/Rich Beausoleil

Bill Radke recaps the biggest stories of the weekend, including the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, the cougar attack in Washington, and why pop songs are getting sadder. Our panelists include Leah Baltus, editor in chief of City Arts magazine and John Roderick, singer and guitarist of The Long Winters.

Marie and Grace share a moment in the film, Always.
David Hogan Photography

Angela DiMarco never intended to make a public film about the loss of her son. It started as a small project to help her grieve.

But her short film, "Always," is now premiering at the Seattle International Film Festival. It follows a husband and wife, struggling after the loss of their daughter. It captures shades of DiMarco's own experience, who lost her son during pregnancy.

"Always" will be screening on Monday, May 28, 2018 

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