Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong | KUOW News and Information

Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong

Producer

Year started with KUOW: 2017

Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong is a producer on The Record. A multimedia storyteller and editor, she has lived and worked on five continents.

Most recently, Adwoa was IDEO's storytelling fellow; she also served as producer for The Alliance for Media Arts + Culture's HatchLabs. She has designed and implemented communications and outreach program at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Evidence for Policy Design at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, and for agricultural development projects with IFDC Nigeria.

As Community Engagement Fellow in Prose at Mills College from 2013-15, she designed and implemented a digital storytelling workshop for immigrant and refugee teen girls. In the same capacity, co-produced a student documentary series for KALW public radio. Adwoa holds a Master of Fine Arts from Mills College in Oakland and a Bachelor of Arts from New College of Florida in Sarasota. She is an alumna of the NextGeneration Radio and VONA fellowships.

File: Sherman Alexie reads from his book, 'Thunder Boy Jr.,' at the RED INK Indigenous Initiative for All at Arizona State University, Tempe, April 22, 2016.
Flickr Photo/ASU Department of English (CC BY 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/JmRvrM

Do you scoff when people say they support their local bookstores, but get their books on Amazon? Is supporting Woody Allen or R. Kelly any different? Katie Anthony says it can’t be. 

A Sony Walkman, belonging to a fictional character named Alex, holds a cassette mix tape.
GeekWire Photo/Kurt Schlosser

Let this segment take you back — WAY back.

We’re in your high school computer class. It's the 1980s: Walkmans in backpacks, satin jackets in lockers, Apple IIe computers running BASIC. Where is this nostalgic wonderland, you ask? 

It's March 14! The day before the Ides of March, three days before St. Patrick's Day, but 3.14 is a special day all its own: Pi Day.

This year is the 30th anniversary of a whimsical holiday that celebrates the irrational, infinite, transcendent excellence of the universal constant.

From left: Tracy Rector and Sara Marie Ortiz
Courtesy Tracy Rector and Sara Marie Ortiz

Can you predict the social media cycle of #metoo? First, the allegations. Then the apology, lackluster or seemingly heartfelt. Then the backlash: shows canceled, jobs lost, formerly prominent men stricken from the public domain. It's happened in film, in television, in comedy. And now it's happening to author Sherman Alexie.

"Untitled", Jean-Michel Basquiat, 1982. Last year the piece sold for $110 million, making it the most expensive piece of American artwork in history.
Courtesy Seattle Art Museum

What does it feel like to be in the room with $100 million? You can find out soon. The most expensive piece of American artwork ever sold at auction — a painting by artist Jean-Michel Basquiat — is coming to the Seattle Art Museum.

Sherman Alexie is a beloved native writer, filmmaker and poet. He also stands accused of sexual harassment by three women on the record and many more anonymously. KUOW reporter Liz Jones is following the story and sat down with Bill Radke after her first piece on the story published. 

It's 3am. Does your coffee machine know where you are?
Flickr Photo/Daniel Foster (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/E3Hf4R

In "1984," surveillance devices were installed in homes by the government. In 2018, we pay corporations to install the surveillance ourselves. Kashmir Hill, a journalist with Gizmodo, chatted with Bill Radke about her own foray into smartening up her home.

Author Jonathan Kauffman.
Courtesy of Jonathan Kauffman

Carob. Some see it as a heroic stand-in for chocolate. Others, like one Twitter wag, see it as "chalky nonsense." Whatever your thoughts, it's a food that evokes a strong response. 

Author Shaun Scott.
Photo by Christopher Grunder


Filmmaker, author and professional millennial Shaun Scott has a bone to pick about participation trophies. They're just one of many broad brushes with which millennials are painted. But, Scott reminds us, millennials weren't the ones giving out the trophies. The parents were.

Concussion study testing equipment.
Flickr Photo/University of the Fraser Valley (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/fpZHqf

Football verges on being an American religion. But instead of the saints being martyred, they're getting hit. Hard. And often. The ensuing concussions can cause severe mental deterioration, erratic behavior, and even suicide.

Shuri readies for a fight in new Marvel film Black Panther.
Courtesy Disney

"Black Panther," the latest cinematic rendition of the Marvel superhero universe, opens nationwide tomorrow.

To call it highly anticipated is an understatement – this opening will blow all previous Marvel film openings out of the water.

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Colson Whitehead.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer

Colson Whitehead’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “The Underground Railroad” is the story of a young slave named Cora who escapes from a Georgia cotton plantation.

The Hale-Bopp comet passes overhead on March 26, 1997.
Flickr Photo/Richard Dinda (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/aQBC9

You probably don't remember the passage of a comet named Hale-Bopp in the late 1990s. But you might remember what came after that. Glynn Washington, host of the podcast Snap Judgment, couldn't look away from that story. 

Is this the only type of love we should celebrate the week of February 14th?
Flickr Photo/Katy Stoddard (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/dTfeCY

This is the week of high-pressure dinner reservations, overpriced roses and, for the enterprising, discount chocolates on the 15th. Valentine's Day is upon us. 

Limebike employees relocate bikes so that they're legally parked.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

There are five bike share companies operating in Dallas, Texas. And they all just got marching orders from the city: Find a way to clean up your products, or we'll impound them. 

The yes light is on.
Flickr Photo/Jeremy Brooks (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/prQbnr

University of Washington sociologist Pepper Schwartz says the takeaway from the allegations against Aziz Ansari is that we should talk about sex before having it. She sat down with Bill Radke to discuss why that is and some of the social programming that gets in the way.

Closeup of a peacock feather.
Flickr Photo/Gary Riley (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/ETAn4o

Last week's viral story of an ersatz emotional support peacock sent waves of hilarity ricocheting across the internet and late night talk shows. But The New York Times' David Leonhardt argues that the creeping normalization of little lies - such as falsehoods about our pets being support or service animals - has a corrosive effect on society over time. Was Dexter the peacock in the coal mine? Bill Radke spoke with Leonhardt to find out.

berries
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

More women are speaking out about sexual abuse and harassment as part of the renewed #MeToo movement.

But for the women picking the fruits and vegetables we buy at local supermarkets, talking about daily abuse isn’t easy.

Washington state poets laureate Claudia Castro Luna and Tod Marshall.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

When you're the poet laureate of Washington state, you log a lot of time on the road. "I got a new car for the job," laughs Tod Marshall. It came to him with 12,000 miles on it, and is now hovering around 57,000 as he hangs up his traveling hat.

Dexter the peacock did not get to fly the friendly skies.
Photo courtesy Dexter the Peacock via Instagram screenshot/www.instagram.com/dexterthepeacock/

This week a woman and her peacock were turned away from a cross-country flight. She'd pleaded that Dexter was an emotional support animal, to no avail. And now the most regal road movie in existence is taking place as the pair drives to Los Angeles instead. But sneaking untrained animals onto planes and into restaurants is no snickering matter, and could soon be subject to civil penalties in Washington state.

Author Ijeoma Oluo.
Photo by Nikki Closser, with permission of the author.

So, you want to talk about race.

But... do you? Reallllly? 

For most people, the real answer is no. 

Dancer Jon Boogz.
Photo courtesy of Marcie Sillman/marciesillman.com

One of them went viral in a collaboration with Yo Yo Ma; the other played Michael Jackson for the Cirque du Soleil. But you might know dancers Lil Buck and Jon Boogz best for their collaboration on the haunting video Color of Reality.

Amtrak 188 derailed in Philadelphia on May 12, 2015, killing 8 and injuring more than 200.
Flickr Photo/Jack Snell (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/e72hn7

Josh Gotbaum is used to helping people. He worked on disaster relief efforts in the Clinton administration, helped bring Hawaiian Airlines back from bankruptcy, and served as founding CEO of The September 11th Fund. But on May 12th, 2015, the helper became the helped when the train he was on came off the tracks.  

Aziz Ansari seen at Netflix original series "Master of None" ATAS panel at the Wolf Theater at Saban Media Center on Monday, June 05, 2017, in Los Angeles, CA.
(Photo by Eric Charbonneau/Invision for Netflix/AP Images)

Recent allegations against actor Aziz Ansari have launched a thousand thinkpieces. Depending on your point of view, this is either a death knell to the #metoo movement or just another link in patriarchy's mighty armor.

When local author Katie Anthony first heard the story, her kneejerk reaction was, "Really? That's just a bad date — we've all been on them." 

Shaun Scott (nametag misspelled)  and Hanna Brooks Olsen, holding the coffees they chose to buy instead of putting down payments on a home. Michael Hobbes has a policy of keeping his face off of the internet. Overhead sparkles are complete happenstance.
KUOW Photo/Adwoa Gyimah-Brempong

If you believe the New York Times, or watch CNN, or have read a thinkpiece between now and 2007 — you already know the bad news: The world is ending. Millennials, the generation born between 1982 and 2000, have arrived to ruin #allthethings, blanketing the landscape with a thick carpet of Snapchat filters, participation trophies, and avocado toast. What does this, the most entitled cohort to ever walk the earth, expect from life? It might not be what you think.

David Sedaris, signing one of more than 8,000 tip-ins. This is the hard labor that goes into your signed author copy.
KUOW Photo/Megan Farmer


David Sedaris was angry.

He was angry because he had to sign his name on 8,000 blank sheets of paper. He was angry because he already signs his name at readings all over the world — and now his publisher was making him sign his name on thousands of “tip-ins” to be bound into copies of his latest book. 

Lauri Hennessey was one of many anonymous women who accused Oregon Senator Bob Packwood of improper conduct in the 1990s.
Courtesy Lauri Hennessey

A powerful senator and public champion of women is accused of sexual harassment. As the number of accusers mounts, his fellow senators urge him to step down. Eventually the pressure is too great, and he resigns. 

We're not talking about Al Franken. We're talking about former Oregon senator Bob Packwood.

high five colors
Flickr Photo/brian.abeling (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/rcMMhx

'Tis the season to think about New Year's resolutions. But we're less interested in the one you made on Monday than the ones that you made for 2017. Did you fail? Or do you have a success story? Jeannie Yandel and Bill Radke shared their own resolutions and heard from callers. 

Courtesy of Rick Fienberg TravelQuest International / Wilderness Travel

2017 was a fun, rigorous, informative year for the producers, editor, and host of The Record. Here are some of the segments we couldn’t forget.

The view from Husky Stadium.
Flickr Photo/Ray Terrill (CC BY 2.0)/flic.kr/p/aCwsMx

Bob Rondeau, the voice of the Huskies, is retiring Saturday after 37 years in the press box. Bill Radke caught up with him in Arizona, where he’ll be calling the Fiesta Bowl before retiring. He asked Rondeau about an especially memorable call – which has stuck with him for all the wrong reasons.

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