Abraham Epton | KUOW News and Information

Abraham Epton

Data Reporter

Year started with KUOW: 2016

Washington state presidential election results, 2016
KUOW graphic/Abe Epton

Maps lie because they simplify. They  lie in different ways, to show certain realities, and electoral maps are no different.

In places where there are few people, hundreds of square miles turn red or blue (but usually red) because those voters cast their ballots in a certain way.

Brian Wahlberg gives daughter Luciena a good view of the proceedings as the crowd sings at Cal Anderson Park in Seattle.
KUOW photo/Gil Aegerter

In the liberal bastion that is Seattle, the response to the election was acute. People cried openly on buses and in cafes. Some took time off work to mourn in bed. It wasn't that their candidate had lost, we heard again and again, it was that they feared for the future.

Sorting bins upside-down in a secure area of the King County Elections headquarters.
KUOW photo/Abe Epton

There’s a room on the second floor of King County Elections headquarters that the priests of ancient Jerusalem might recognize.

Like the biblical Holy of Holies, this is a room that only a select few may enter; a room that symbolizes something important about the society that created it.

In our case, a casino-security company helped build it to house the computers that count our election results. (You can watch livestreams of the counting in action at King County Elections HQ here.)

Forest lands near Skykomish, Washington.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

More than $1.2 million has been spent on one of more obscure statewide races in Washington.

That's the battle for public lands commissioner. Democrat Hilary Franz and Republican Steven McLaughlin have each raised over $400,000, and two environmental groups have spent another $400,000 on independent expenditures in the race.

This ballot's stamp game is on point.
KUOW

Let’s repeat that, in case you skimmed over the headline: 

Your ballot will be counted even if you DO NOT affix a stamp to the envelope. 

Sound Transit's Capitol Hill Station, prior to opening, 25 January 2016.
Flickr Photo/Don Wilson (CC BY-SA 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/Efv737

Money keeps pouring into the battle over the Sound Transit 3 ballot measure, with Mass Transit Now, the campaign working to pass the $54 billion transit package, up to nearly $3 million in contributions.

Flickr user Nick Ares / Creative Commons

Campaign cash, often in six-figure chunks, is sloshing around the Washington elections as November draws near. 

If the figures reported by the Washington Public Disclosure Commission are any indicator, last week was a big one for the makers of oversized novelty checks. Last week saw 11 checks of $100,000 or more—including two of this year's biggest. 

Washington's voter registration system has been targeted by cyber attackers, state elections officials have told KUOW. Secretary of State Kim Wyman said Friday afternoon the attackers appeared to be the same people who targeted Arizona earlier this year.

Grizz, the author's cat. This photo makes sense if you read the story.
KUOW Photo/Abraham Epton

Elections are big business, with consultants, campaign staffers, advertising firms and TV stations raking in big bucks. 

Can you see them?
Google Earth

The most Republican block in Seattle is at 116 Fairview Avenue North in South Lake Union.

It’s the site of a large, upscale retirement community called Mirabella. Nothing outside screams Republican – no Trump hats or “Hillary for Prison in 2016.” 

Kitsap Transit

A Seattle-area transit initiative takes in money from real-estate interests who could profit if the initiative passes. Commuters would face higher taxes, but many could also get to work faster.

No, we’re not talking about the $54 billion proposal to expand Sound Transit service (that campaign has been largely funded by $1.1 million from the construction industry, with the real-estate sector coming in second.) 

Grizz, the author's cat. This photo makes sense if you read the story.
KUOW Photo/Abraham Epton

Politicians are reputed to be as eager for contributions as my cat when she sees me reaching for the wet food.

KUOW Illustration/Kara McDermott

Homemakers and entrepreneurs, farmers and retirees: What unites them? These are some of the most frequently-held occupations among Republican donors in Washington state.

On Thursday, June 30, KUOW is hosting an event in Bellevue where we hope to bring Washington state Republicans together to discuss the present and future of their party.

Sound Transit CEO Peter Rogoff, King County Executive Dow Constantine and Seattle Mayor Ed Murray at Capitol Hill's light rail station.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

If you see an ad pushing the Sound Transit 3 ballot measure anytime soon, odds are it will have been paid for by a group that stands to make millions of dollars from ST3’s passage.