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Africa
9:00 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Burundi Genocide Survivor: Running Eases Mind

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 11:00 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

It's been 20 years today since a small East African country descended into turmoil after the death of its president, and I'm not talking about Rwanda. A year before the genocide in that county, the Hutu president of neighboring Burundi Melchoir Ndadaye was assassinated. Hutus retaliated by slaughtering thousands of their Tutsi neighbors, perhaps as many as 25,000. A decade later, the United Nations International Commission of Inquiry for Burundi called it a genocide.

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Economy
9:00 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Post Shutdown, Economy Needs Restart

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 11:00 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, one blogger wants black women to be more welcome in the world of comic books, videogames and science fiction. We'll talk about her efforts to change geek culture in just a few minutes.

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Arts & Life
9:00 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Black Girl 'Geeks' Want To See More Of Themselves In Comics

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 11:00 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, it's the 20th anniversary of the horrific genocide in Burundi that took thousands of lives. We'll hear from a survivor about how he found healing and forgiveness for his tormentors through running. That's just ahead. But first, off the top of your head, how many black female comic book characters can you name? There's Storm of course from the X-Men. She was my favorite growing up. But other than that, who else?

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Parallels
8:46 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Britain To Build New Nuclear Plant, Bucking European Trend

A worker walks inside the turbine hall of the Sizewell nuclear plant in eastern England in 2006. The U.K. government on Monday announced that French-owned EDF would build the first new British nuclear power station in 20 years.
Lefteris Pitarakis AP

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 10:13 am

Britain has approved the construction of the country's first nuclear power station in 20 years.

NPR's Philip Reeves, reporting on the announcement for our Newscast unit, said the move goes counter to a European trend to phase out nuclear power in the aftermath of Japan's Fukushima disaster in 2011.

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Parallels
8:25 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Syria's Grinding War Takes Toll On Children

Children play at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, where more than 120,000 Syrian refugees live. Roughly two-thirds are kids, many of whom have been traumatized by the violence in their homeland.
Cassandra Nelson Mercy Corps

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 11:19 am

Alexandra Chen, a specialist in childhood trauma, is on her way from the Lebanese capital, Beirut, to the southern town of Nabatiyeh, where she's running a workshop for teachers, child psychologists and sports coaches who are dealing with the Syrian children scarred by war in their homeland.

"All of the children have experienced trauma to varying degree," explains Chen, who works for Mercy Corps and is training a dozen new hires for her aid group.

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The Two-Way
8:20 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Supreme Court Will Hear Case On Executions And Mental Disability

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 11:40 am

The standard by which a person is judged to be mentally competent enough to face execution for a crime will be reviewed by the U.S. Supreme Court, which agreed Monday to hear a Florida case revolving around that issue.

The capital punishment case, Hall, Freddie L. v. Fla., centers on the standard for judging mental disability and how state officials arrive at that judgment. The case will be argued in Washington early in 2014.

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The Two-Way
8:08 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Existing Home Sales Dip After Hitting 4-Year High

A sold sign in Chicago earlier this year.
Scott Olson Getty Images

There were 1.9 percent fewer existing homes sold in September than in August, the National Association of Realtors said Monday.

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The Two-Way
7:44 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Facebook Users Don't 'Like' This: Status Update Error Messages

Facebook

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 8:51 am

If you tried to post a status update on Facebook or "like" someone else's Monday morning, you probably got a message like this:

"There was a problem updating your status. Please try again later."

You are not alone. The Miami Herald reports:

"Facebook users are reporting trouble logging in and posting updates Monday morning.

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Elections 2013
7:22 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Washington's Initiative 522: A Tale Of Two Northwest Farms

Eric Maier farms 7,000 acres of wheat and cattle near Ritzville, Washington. He says labeling GMO foods would possibly curtail an option that would keep his farm competitive globally in the future.
Anna King Northwest News Network

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 7:27 am

The state of Washington grows about 300 types of crops -- from the lush valleys north of Seattle, to the orchards of the Columbia Basin, to the rolling fields between Spokane and Walla Walla. And if you ask any of those farmers about Washington’s Initiative 522 and you’ll get every kind of answer.

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Women And Faith
7:00 am
Mon October 21, 2013

At A Younger Age, Mormon Women Are Eager To Share Their Faith

Alisa Baumgartner chats with fellow missionary Andrea Jackson. Jackson, 19, is taking 18 months off from college to do mission work.
Stina Sieg KJZZ

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 1:29 pm

Tara Carpenter points to a wall map to show where she'll soon spend 18 months proselytizing.

"The left side of Kentucky, just a teeny, tiny bit of Illinois, and I think I'm a little bit in Missouri," she says.

Carpenter, 19, is smiley and outgoing. About a year ago, she was thinking about going on a mission — but only thinking about it, because women in the Mormon Church couldn't be missionaries until 21.

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Women and Health
6:56 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Breast Milk Bought Online Has High Levels Of Bacteria

A lab technician at the Mothers' Milk Bank Northeast in Newton Upper Falls, Mass., prepares donated breast milk for pasteurization in August 2012. The process kills harmful bacteria.
Elise Amendola Associated Press

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 10:53 am

Online breast milk marketplaces can be a godsend for a mother who might not be producing enough for her baby but still wants her child to get the the health benefits of breast milk. But milk sold on one popular website had more bacterial contamination than that from a milk bank, a study finds.

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The Two-Way
6:43 am
Mon October 21, 2013

UPDATE: N.J. Gov. Christie Won't Fight Gay-Marriage Ruling

The hands of Beth Asaro, left, and Joanne Schailey after they exchanged vows to become the first same-sex couple married in Lambertville, N.J., early Monday.
Rich Schultz AP

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 11:09 am

"Gov. Chris Christie announced today that he was dropping the fight against same-sex marriage in New Jersey by withdrawing his appeal of a major case that was being heard by the state Supreme Court," The Star-Ledger writes.

Christie's office has released a copy if its court filing, in which it officially withdraws its appeal.

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The Two-Way
6:41 am
Mon October 21, 2013

These Cats Are Mules: Kitties Smuggle Goods Into Prisons

Brazil's General Superintendency of Prisons of Alagoas (SGAP) released this photo last Dec. 31 of a cat caught with contraband taped to its body at a medium-security prison in Alagoas state.
AP

January:

"Cat Caught Smuggling Contraband Into Brazilian Prison." Gothamist

June:

"Cat Caught Smuggling Cell Phones Into Prison" (in Russia). The Moscow Times

Last week:

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The Two-Way
6:38 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Hurricane Raymond Strengthens As it Moves Toward Mexico In Pacific

Hurricane Raymond is seen at 2 p.m. ET Monday, in a photo provided by NOAA. The storm is threatening an area of Mexico that's still coping with the effects of last month's massive rains.
NOAA AP

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 1:53 pm

Hurricane Raymond has been upgraded to a Category 3 storm in the Pacific Ocean, as it moves slowly northward toward Mexico's southwest coast. Forecasters at the U.S. National Hurricane Center say it could gain more strength before it begins to weaken Tuesday.

Monday morning, the Hurricane Center said that Raymond had maximum sustained winds of 120 mph, with stronger gusts recorded. The storm is moving northward at a 2 mph pace from its current location about 165 miles west-southwest of Acapulco. It was some 100 miles from the coast.

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Shots - Health News
6:27 am
Mon October 21, 2013

First Polio Cases Since 1999 Suspected In Syria

Syrian opposition fighters sit on the front line in the city of Deir Ezzor on Oct. 13. Ongoing violence has ravaged the city since March 2011.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 7:10 am

The World Health Organization is investigating a cluster of possible polio cases in an eastern province of Syria.

If the cases are confirmed, they'd be the first ones in the war-torn nation in more than a decade. The country eliminated polio in 1999.

Syria used to have one of the highest polio vaccination rates in the region. If the virus has returned, it would be a high-profile example of the ramifications of the collapse of Syria's once-vaunted public health system.

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