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Shots - Health News
2:23 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

How A Family Copes With Schizophrenia And Suicide

Homer Bell's family: sister Laura Bell (from left), sister Regina Bell, mother Rosalind Scott and stepfather Jack Wilcox.
Jeff Cohen WNPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 4:21 pm

Homer Bell was 54 years old when he killed himself in April in a very public way — he laid down his head in front of a stopped bus in his hometown of Hartford, Conn. It was the last act in a life filled with struggle, as Bell and his family endured his schizophrenia.

At a time when there are calls to strengthen the mental health system, Bell's story shows how hard coping with mental illness can be.

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Code Switch
2:23 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

How Musicians Helped Integrate The Silver Screen

When Gene Krupa's orchestra was cast in 1941's Ball of Fire, trumpeter Roy Eldridge's presence was not negotiable.
Express Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 9:28 am

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The Two-Way
2:22 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Obama Nominates Caroline Kennedy To Be Ambassador To Japan

Caroline Kennedy in February of 2013.
Slaven Vlasic Getty Images

President Obama has nominated Caroline Kennedy to serve as the United States' ambassador to Japan.

NPR's Mara Liasson filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"The daughter of President John F. Kennedy and an early and significant supporter of President Obama's, Kennedy is also an attorney and the author of several best-selling books. If confirmed she would fit a tradition for the Japan post — where many other prominent Americans have served. But she would be the first female ambassador to Japan.

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The Two-Way
2:18 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Why The Latest Gulf Leak Is No BP Disaster

Fire boats battle a fire at the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon in April 2010.
U.S. Coast Guard Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 3:06 pm

Teams of workers are mobilizing in the Gulf of Mexico to try to stem a natural gas leak at an offshore drilling rig that exploded and caught fire Tuesday. The rig off the Louisiana coast has been partially destroyed by the out of control blaze, and firefighting boats are on the scene.

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Code Switch
2:01 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

How The Death Of A 12-Year-Old Changed The City Of Dallas

Twelve-year-old Santos Rodriguez was shot and killed by a police officer in Dallas on July 24, 1973.
Courtesy of the Dallas Mexican American Historical League

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 4:21 pm

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The Two-Way
1:32 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

In First Public Mass In Brazil, Pope Francis Urges Humility, Charity

Pope Francis celebrates Mass at the Basilica of the National Shrine of Our Lady Aparecida on Wednesday in Aparecida, Brazil.
Buda Mendes Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 1:50 pm

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NPR Story
1:04 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Why Is Galesburg So Popular With Presidents?

President Barack Obama visits the Galesburg High School football team, Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2011, in Galesburg, Ill., during his three-day economic bus tour. (Carolyn Kaster/AP)

If you’re wondering why President Obama is in Galesburg, Illinois, he has been there before and it turns out he’s not the only president or future president to visit the small prairie town west of Chicago.

Fifteen men who were either in the nation’s highest office or went on to become president have made stops in Galesburg.

The first future President to visit was Abraham Lincoln in 1858 when he was running for the U.S. Senate.

One of the famous Lincoln-Douglas debates was held on the Knox College campus that President Obama is visiting today.

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NPR Story
1:04 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

President Obama Shifts Focus To The Economy

President Barack Obama waves as he boards Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., Wednesday, July 24, 2013. Obama is traveling to Knox College in Galesburg, Ill., to kick off a series of speeches that will lay out his vision for rebuilding the economy. (Cliff Owen/AP)

NPR’s national political correspondent Mara Liasson joins us to talk about the politics of President Obama’s economic speech at Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois.

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NPR Story
1:04 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Growing Up Royal

0724_Britain's Queen Elizabeth II, then Princess Elizabeth, center, waves as she stands on the balcony of Buckingham Palace, London, with her grandparents King George V and Queen Mary, in this May 6, 1935 photo. Princess Margaret is just visible over the balcony edge. (AP)

The infant prince, third in line to the British throne, is now home with his parents, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

His life will be one of privilege, of course, but also one of formal duty and protocol.

For some perspective, consider the childhood of his great-grandmother, Queen Elizabeth, who grew up during World War II. The Queen visited her great-grandson for the first time today.

The BBC’s Nicola Stanbridge reports on the life of an heir to the throne.

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Shots - Health News
12:18 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Plan B To Hit Shelves, Protected From Generics

The Plan B One-Step morning-after pill will now be available to women as young as 15 without a prescription, and will have another three years of protection from generic competition.
AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 2:54 pm

As expected, the Food and Drug Administration has granted an additional three years of protection from generic competition to the makers of the most popular form of the emergency contraceptive pill,

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Book Reviews
11:53 am
Wed July 24, 2013

'My Lunches With Orson' Puts You At The Table With Welles

Central Press Getty Images

If you asked me to name my favorite movie scene, I'd choose the one in Citizen Kane when newspaper owner Charles Foster Kane steals his rivals' best reporters, then throws a party in his own honor. As musicians literally sing his praises, we watch Kane dance with chorus girls wearing a look of radiant delight. It's a moment bursting with promise and cockiness and joie de vivre, made all the more exuberant because Kane's pleasure is so obviously shared by Welles himself.

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The Two-Way
11:51 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Principal In Indian Lunch Poisoning Tragedy Is Arrested

Indian children and activists shout anti-government slogans on Saturday as they march to parliament demonstrating against the death of 23 children in Bihar state after they ate poisoned "midday meals."
Raveendran AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 11:56 am

More than a week after 23 children in India died after eating an insecticide-laced lunch, the principal in charge of the school's mid-day meal program has been arrested.

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The Two-Way
10:52 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Royal Baby Gets A Name: George Alexander Louis

Britain's Prince William, right, and Kate, Duchess of Cambridge hold the Prince of Cambridge on Tuesday as they pose for photographers outside St. Mary's Hospital in London.
Kirsty Wigglesworth AP

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 12:15 pm

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have now named their new baby boy: The third in line for the British throne was given the name George Alexander Louis.

"The baby will be known as His Royal Highness Prince George of Cambridge," the crown said in a press release.

By historical standards, this is an expedited naming. In the past, royals have waited weeks to announce a name. Prince Charles' name wasn't known for a month; Prince William's name wasn't made public for seven days.

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NPR Story
10:42 am
Wed July 24, 2013

12-Year-Old Learns Perils Of Day Trading In New Novel

In her new book for young adults, “The Short Seller,” Elissa Brent Weissman gives us the ultimate “short seller”: 12-year-old Lindy Sachs (excerpt below).

Math bores her until her father starts teaching her how to trade on the stock market.

When Lindy is home sick with a bout of mono, he gives her her very own account and $100 to invest however as she likes, and she quickly gets in over her head.

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NPR Story
10:42 am
Wed July 24, 2013

A New Kind Of Second Opinion — At A Price

(surroundsound5000/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 1:04 pm

Psychologist Sandor Gardos had seen 80 experts, including Nobel prize winners, but none were able to diagnose his serious medical condition — much less offer any effective treatment.

That’s when a friend told him about a new firm, MetaMed, which specializes in a different kind of second opinion. It offers personalized research for a price to people with difficult medical conditions.

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