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It's All Politics
11:12 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Texas' Democratic Darling Will Decide On Governor's Race Soon

Texas state Sen. Wendy Davis speaks at a Washington, D.C., fundraiser last month.
Nick Wass AP

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 2:24 pm

Official Washington has fled for dog-day vacations few deserved, leaving the nation's capital a bit languid and bereft of news.

Enter, as if on cue, Texas state Sen. Wendy Davis of abortion bill filibuster fame, with a speech Monday at the National Press Club.

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NPR Story
11:09 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Doctor Who? The Answer Is Peter Capaldi

Peter Capaldi is pictured at the World Premiere of World War Z at a central London cinema, June 2, 2013. (Joel Ryan/Invision via AP)

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 2:32 pm

Fans of the BBC show “Doctor Who” got the news they’ve been waiting for last night.

During a half-hour special, the BBC announced the name of the actor who will be playing the role of the Doctor in season 8: Scottish actor Peter Capaldi.

The 55-year-old will step into the role in January 2014.

“Doctor Who” has been running on and off since 1963. The show ran from 1963 to 1989 and was revived in 2005.

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NPR Story
11:09 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Bipartisan Bill Aims To Protect NCAA Athletes

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 2:32 pm

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), the organization that regulates college sports, is taking some heat from members of Congress.

The House is considering legislation, called the NCAA Accountability Act, that would require member colleges to guarantee that players’ multi-year scholarships aren’t dropped if they get injured.

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NPR Story
11:09 am
Mon August 5, 2013

First Lab-Grown Burger Has 'Quite Some Intense Taste'

The world's first lab-grown hamburger is eaten in London. (BBC video screenshot)

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 2:32 pm

The world’s first lab-grown hamburger was cooked and eaten in London today. The burger was grown from stem cells taken from a dead cow.

It cost $325,000 to grow, but researchers believe the technology will eventually reduce the cost of meat production and meet growing demand.

The BBC’s science correspondent, Pallab Ghosh, has had exclusive access to the laboratory in the Netherlands where the meat was grown, and spoke to the researchers involved.

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The Salt
11:04 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Sandwich Monday: Chili Cheeseburger A-Plenty

As you approach the Beacon in Spartanburg, S.C., you see the lighthouse, which is the only light thing you're going to encounter for the next half-hour or so.
NPR

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 11:44 am

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World Cafe
11:00 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Next: Rose Windows

Rose Windows.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 2:46 pm

Rose Windows' debut album, The Sun Dogs, is steeped in '60s classic rock, recalling the heavy organ sounds of The Doors and the folk-infused flutes of Traffic. Formed in 2010 by songwriter Chris Cheveyo, the Seattle septet signed a label deal earlier this year, then put together an album that's layered with Middle Eastern influences.

Hear two songs from The Sun Dogs, a mellow combination of psychedelic folk and blues-rock instrumentation.

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Author Interviews
10:32 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Talent Or Skill?: Homing In On The Elusive 'Sports Gene'

According to author David Epstein, hitters like the Los Angeles Angels' Albert Pujols look at the movement of the pitcher's shoulder, torso or hand to help them hit the ball.
Brian Bahr Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 8:59 pm

We've all had the experience of watching a great athletic performance — from gymnast Mary Lou Retton defying gravity to Michael Jordan sinking a mind-blowing turnaround jumper — and wondered: Were they born with that talent or can you get there with hard work and practice?

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The Two-Way
10:19 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Goodbye Earth! What Messenger Saw On Its Way To Mercury

Earth as seen by the Messenger spacecraft.
NASA

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 11:48 am

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The Two-Way
10:17 am
Mon August 5, 2013

15 Years Later, Tawana Brawley Has Paid 1 Percent Of Penalty

Tawana Brawley, with the Rev. Al Sharpton, in 1988.
Mark Elias AP

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 11:32 am

It was 1987 when a black teenager, Tawana Brawley, said she had been raped and kidnapped by a group of white men in Dutchess County, N.Y.

Her story of being attacked, scrawled with racial slurs, smeared with feces and left beside a road wrapped in a plastic bag made front pages across the nation — especially after the Rev. Al Sharpton took up her case.

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All Tech Considered
10:03 am
Mon August 5, 2013

The Effort To Write Laws For Your Digital Life After Death

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 11:21 am

Time was when the belongings you left behind after death were tangible — furniture, jewelry, letters — and financial property, which hundreds of years of experience have taught executors how to handle. Today, some of the most valuable keys to our lives and identities exist digitally, and are technically owned by companies like Google or Facebook.

For the digital assets stored on shared servers in the cloud, legal systems have yet to catch up to help decide who controls your data when you're dead. And uniform laws around control of these assets could help.

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Parallels
9:49 am
Mon August 5, 2013

World War II Researchers Say 'Italian Schindler' Was A Myth

The Risiera di San Sabba in Trieste was used during World War II as the only death camp on Italian soil. In the building's courtyard, the outline on the brick wall is where the crematorium was located.
Sylvia Poggioli NPR

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 3:24 pm

A group of Italian researchers who have studied troves of World War II documents have found no evidence that Giovanni Palatucci, a police official long credited as the "Italian Schindler," saved the lives of 5,000 Jews.

The findings are demolishing the Italian national icon and angering supporters of the man who has been honored at Israel's Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial, and who has been put on the track to sainthood.

'Unfounded' Claims Of Heroism?

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Literary History
9:42 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Former Steinbeck Boat Waits In Port Townsend Dry-Dock Limbo

Anne Shaffer Coastal Watershed Institute

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 4:39 pm


The Port of Port Townsend, Wash., is providing a temporary home to a piece of literary history. But the dry-docked sardine fishing boat once chartered by the writer John Steinbeck faces an uncertain fate. 


The 76-foot boat's original name was the Western Flyer. In 1940, John Steinbeck and marine biologist Ed Ricketts (who later inspired the character Doc in "Cannery Row") chartered the wood vessel for a cruise around Baja California.

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Parallels
9:28 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Why India's Next State Is Not Likely To Be The Last

Visitors ride in a carriage at the entrance of the Jewel of the Nizams "Falaknuma Palace," the former residence of Nizam Mehaboob Ali Khan in the old city area of Hyderabad. The legacy of these Muslim rulers — and the disenfranchisement of the Hindu majority — contributed to the economic gap in Andhra Pradesh.
Noah Seelam AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 10:35 am

India's cartographers may soon be redrawing the country's map. If events go to plan, India will inaugurate Telangana, its 29th state, perhaps as early as next year — casting the spotlight anew on the challenges of governing a country as vast, and with a population as diverse, as India.

Telangana, on the arid Deccan plateau, is due to be carved out of the southern state of Andhra Pradesh, India's fifth most populous state, with a population of 85 million.

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Parallels
9:22 am
Mon August 5, 2013

A West Bank Spring At The Center Of Deadly Struggle

Palestinian Bashir Tamimi, 57, drinks water from a spring on land that he says belongs to his family. Teenagers from a nearby Israeli settlement built collection pools and brought in picnic tables when they saw no one using the spring. It has now become a source of conflict.
Emily Harris/NPR

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 7:00 am

There's a pretty little spring in the Israeli-occupied West Bank, where fresh water has dripped from the rock, probably for centuries.

Now it is the center of a deadly struggle over land.

Israeli teenagers from Halamish, the Jewish settlement a short walk uphill, found the spring several years ago. It flows from a small cave.

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Remembrances
9:02 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Civil Rights Leader Julius Chambers Fought Through Courts

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 9:44 am

Julius Chambers argued numerous civil rights cases before the U.S. Supreme Court - and won them all. Host Michel Martin remembers the groundbreaking attorney, who passed away recently at the age of 76.

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