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The Two-Way
11:33 am
Tue November 12, 2013

One Of Fed's First Quantitative Easers: 'I'm Sorry, America'

Andrew Huszar.
Rutgers

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 3:32 pm

One of the men who oversaw the Federal Reserve's first round of quantitative easing is making a remarkable statement with an op-ed in The Wall Street Journal today.

"I'm sorry, America," Andrew Huszar writes.

Huszar, who was initially hired by the Fed to oversee the purchase of $1.25 trillion worth of mortgage bonds in a year, goes on to describe the program as the "greatest backdoor Wall Street bailout of all time."

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Parallels
11:22 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Do For-Profit Schools Give Poor Kenyans A Real Choice?

Young students in a Bridge International Academy school in Nairobi, in September. On the surface, there's little to distinguish these schools from others in the developing world. But Bridge's model relies on teachers reading lessons from tablets.
Frederic Courbet for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 22, 2014 10:54 am

Bridge International Academies has set up more than 200 schools in Kenya over the past four years, and plans to open 50 more in January.

Using a school-in-a-box model, Bridge's founders say it gives primary schoolkids a quality education for roughly $5 a month.

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The Two-Way
11:04 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Women Fare Worse In Egypt Than In Any Arab State: Survey

A new survey of gender experts finds that in the Arab world, Egyptian women face the worst treatment. Here, women attend a political march to the presidential palace in Cairo in February.
Khaled Desouki AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 2:35 pm

Citing high rates of sexual harassment and female genital mutilation, a new survey finds that women in Egypt face the worst treatment in any Arab country. Other countries with high levels of unrest — Iraq and Syria — are also among the worst for women, along with Saudi Arabia, according to the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

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Parallels
10:50 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Can The Philippines Save Itself From Typhoons?

The sun sets behind a house damaged by Typhoon Haiyan outside the hard-hit city of Tacloban. The Philippines has gotten better at preparing for typhoons, but remains extremely vulnerable.
Philippe Lopez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 11:05 am

For the third year in a row, the Philippines has been hit by a major storm claiming more than 1,000 lives, and the death toll from Haiyan, one of the worst on record, could climb to 10,000.

With thousands of islands in the warm waters of the Pacific, the Philippines is destined to face the wrath of angry tropical storms year after year.

So what can a poor, densely populated country do to mitigate the huge loss of life and the massive destruction?

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The Two-Way
10:44 am
Tue November 12, 2013

After Typhoon Tore Through, People 'Were Left On Their Own'

In Guiuan, the Philippines, the typhoon left behind destruction and left people fending for themselves in the first days after.
John Alvin Villafranca Courtesy of David Santos and the photographer

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 2:56 pm

  • David Santos on saying prayers as the typhoon raged.
  • David Santos on realizing how widespread the destruction was.

The concrete floors and walls shook, the door of the room almost blew off its hinges and he "said a lot prayers," Filipino TV reporter David Santos says as he remembers what it was like to ride out Typhoon Haiyan inside a small hospital in the Philippines town of Guiuan.

Then, when he and other survivors emerged on Friday, the scene was incredible.

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Commentary
10:11 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Was Rand Paul's Plagiarism Dishonest Or A Breach Of Good Form?

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., talks to reporters at the U.S. Capitol on Sept. 3.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 1:31 pm

Even taken together, the charges didn't seem to amount to that big a deal — just a matter of quoting a few factual statements and a Wikipedia passage without attributing them. But as Rand Paul discovered, the word "plagiarism" can still rouse people to steaming indignation. Samuel Johnson called plagiarism the most reproachful of literary crimes, and the word itself began as the name of a real crime. In Roman law, a plagiarius was someone who abducted a child or a slave — it's from "plaga," the Latin word for a net or a snare.

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Humor & Depression
10:11 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Even When It Hurts 'ALOT,' Brosh Faces Life With Plenty Of 'Hyperbole'

This Is Why I'll Never Be An Adult" blog post. (It's now a popular Internet meme.)" href="/post/even-when-it-hurts-alot-brosh-faces-life-plenty-hyperbole" class="noexit lightbox">
You may recognize this drawing from Allie Brosh's popular "This Is Why I'll Never Be An Adult" blog post. (It's now a popular Internet meme.)
Courtesy Touchstone Books

Originally published on Mon December 9, 2013 1:21 pm

Allie Brosh's humorous, autobiographical blog, Hyperbole and a Half, has a huge following. In 2011, an editor of PC World included it in a list of the funniest sites on the Internet, and this year, Advertising Age included Brosh in its annual list of the year's most influential and creative thinkers and doers.

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It's All Politics
9:42 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Chris Christie's Surprising Role Model For Minority Outreach

Ronald Reagan walks over rubble in a South Bronx lot in August 1980.
Pickoff AP

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 1:06 pm

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie says he can teach national Republicans an important lesson: If they want to appeal to voters beyond their traditional conservative base, they need to go to where those voters are.

As he made the rounds of Sunday's Washington talk shows, Christie explained his rationale to Fox News' Chris Wallace:

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The Two-Way
9:34 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Shooting At Houston-Area House Party Was Gang Fight, Says DA

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 3:28 pm

Here's a quick update to a story we told you about over the weekend: Authorities are shedding a bit more light on a Houston-area incident that left two dead and 22 injured after gunmen opened fire during an 18th birthday celebration.

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Energy Efficiency
9:27 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Heat Pump Water Heaters A Hot Commodity, But Not For Everyone

Diagram of a heat pump water heater
New Zealand Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 11:51 am

Electric water heaters eat up a lot of power -- and can take up about a fifth of your electricity bill. But there’s a hot new thing in the water heater world.

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The Two-Way
9:18 am
Tue November 12, 2013

New York's One World Trade Center Declared Tallest Building In U.S.

The world's tallest buildings by architectural top.
CTBUH

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 2:02 pm

One World Trade Center — the skyscraper that now rises from the site of the Twin Towers, destroyed during the terrorists attacks of Sept. 11 — has been declared the tallest building in the U.S. by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat.

Coming in at 1,776 feet tall, the World Trade Center beat out the Willis Tower in Chicago. At issue was whether a 408-foot needle that sits atop the New York building was an architectural top or a removable radio antenna. If it had been deemed an antenna, the honor would have gone to Chicago.

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The Two-Way
9:12 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Justice Reaches Deal To Allow American, US Airways Merger

A US Airways plane rests near two American Airlines jets at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport last year. The combined carrier would be named American Airlines.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 9:57 am

The Justice Department has reached a deal that will allow for the merger of American and US Airways, opening the door to the creation of the world's largest airline.

The merger still needs final approval from a bankruptcy court.

The U.S. had hoped to block the merger arguing that it would result in less competition and higher prices for consumers.

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Typhoon Haiyan
9:00 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Typhoon's Death Toll Likely Near 2,500, President Aquino Says

On Tuesday, a boy sat in the debris of destroyed houses in Tacloban, on the eastern Filipino island of Leyte.
Noel Celis AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 9:35 am

  • From the airport in Tacloban: NPR's Anthony Kuhn says Tuesday that "people are very hungry" and some are quite angry.
  • On 'Morning Edition': Marine Brig. Gen. Paul Kennedy talks about Typhoon Haiyan and the destruction in the Philippines

Update at 12:30 p.m. ET:

Grim estimates that the death toll in the Philippines from Typhoon Haiyan might be around 10,000 appear to have been "too much," President Benigno Aquino III told CNN Tuesday.

Aquino said that as more information has come in about the devastation, the figure is looking more likely to be between 2,000 to 2,500.

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The Two-Way
8:49 am
Tue November 12, 2013

VIDEO: No Joke As Backboard Almost Crushes Globetrotter

Uh-oh. William "Bull" Bullard of the Harlem Globetrotters brought the basket, backboard and stanchion down with him after a dunk. He just missed getting crushed.
YouTube.com

William "Bull" Bullard of the Harlem Globetrotters is OK, but what happened to him during an exhibition in Honduras is not a laughing matter.

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The Two-Way
8:44 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Egypt Lifts 3-Month-Old State Of Emergency

Women supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and ousted president Mohamed Morsi take part in a march through the streets of Cairo on November 8, 2013.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

Following a court decision Tuesday, Egypt has lifted a three-month-old state of emergency that was implemented following the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi. The court ordered the state of emergency lifted two days before the government intended to do so.

Egypt's Al-Ahram newspaper reports:

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