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Parallels
3:39 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Which Bad Syria Option Do You Prefer?

A rebel fighter takes cover inside a damaged building in the eastern Syrian city of Deir al-Zor on Tuesday. The U.S. is training a small number of rebels and has pledged to provide them with arms.
Khalil Ashawi Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 11:34 am

Syria's civil war is complicated, but at least there's a consensus among American policymakers: There are no good options.

So let's pretend you're the president and you need to decide what action, if any, the U.S. should take. The possibilities are endless, and plenty of unintended consequences are sure to follow.

To make your decision manageable, we're presenting four basic options. We realize they are not mutually exclusive, but you have to focus on something. You can make your choice at the bottom of this story.

Please choose wisely:

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Around the Nation
3:13 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Politicians Exposed: Weiner Shouts, Haley Locked Out

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 3:58 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne, with news of a couple of politicians exposed.

A video is now circulating of mayoral candidate Anthony Wiener engaged in an ugly shouting match yesterday in a Brooklyn bakery with a customer who, Wiener says, insulted his wife. Not available for viewing is South Carolina's Nikki Haley in her bathrobe, locked out of the governor's mansion. She was sending her kids off to school when the door snapped shut behind her. One Facebook comment: At least you had on a robe.

It's All Politics
3:03 am
Thu September 5, 2013

The Syria Vote: A Guide To The Congressional Factions

President Obama gestures during his joint news conference with Swedish Prime Minister Fredrik Reinfeldt on Wednesday in Stockholm. The president said the credibility of the international community, Congress and America is on the line with the response to Syria.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 3:59 am

This won't be a standard party-line vote. Big factions within both parties remain skeptical about President Obama's plans to launch punitive airstrikes against Syria.

If the vote were held today, it might not pass. Obama and his allies — including top House leaders of both parties — have a big selling job yet to do to persuade a majority of members to authorize military action.

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Middle East
2:51 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Assad Offers A Different View Of What's Going On In Syria

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 3:58 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And while the United States works on that resolution, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad is offering a different face to his people. The Syrian leader's Instagram account now includes images of his smiling first lady, Asma al-Assad. The account shows her helping out in a soup kitchen and also congratulating top-achieving students. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Politics
2:08 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Lawmakers Struggle With Wording Of Syria Resolution

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 3:58 am

Congress is trying to fashion language that would restrict U.S. involvement in Syria from escalating. But lawmakers often find it uncomfortable to rein in the commander in chief once U.S. forces have been committed.

Books News & Features
2:08 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Tina Brown: Women Are Terrifyingly Vulnerable In Many Places

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 12:48 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Tina Brown is back now for our regular series Word of Mouth, where she brings us her must-reads. Tina, of course, is the editor-in-chief of "The Daily Beast." She's also the founder of the annual Women in the World Summit. Today, she has three reads on women whose lives were changed by kidnapping and captivity. And just a warning: This conversation does include adult topics and sensitive language. Tina, good morning.

TINA BROWN: Good morning.

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Business
2:08 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Data Marketing Critics Check Out What's Written About Them

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 6:34 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Companies that collect and sell information about you are usually pretty secretive about what they have on you. But one of the biggest data brokers is now letting consumers have a peek.

Yesterday, the Acxiom Corp. set up a website where people can look themselves up. It's called AboutTheData.com. As NPR's Martin Kaste reports, some of the first people to try it were the data industry's critics.

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U.S.
12:26 am
Thu September 5, 2013

More Cities Sweeping Homeless Into Less Prominent Areas

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 3:58 am

In North Carolina, a fight is brewing over the homeless in the capital city of Raleigh. Elected leaders have asked charitable and religious groups to stop their long-standing tradition of feeding the homeless in a downtown park on weekends.

But advocates for the poor say the city is trying to push the homeless out of a neighborhood that business leaders want to spruce up.

'I Will Arrest You'

Almost every day, the Rev. Hugh Hollowell walks through Moore Square, a centuries-old city park in downtown Raleigh.

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Around the Nation
12:25 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Forget Twitter. In St. Louis, Bare Your Soul Via Typewriter

Goldkamp also keeps an index card file of choice words to integrate into his poem when he has trouble finding the right words.
Erin Williams STL Public Radio

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 5:10 pm

Typically, 21st century writers fall into two technical categories: Mac or PC. But poet Henry Goldkamp would much rather use a typewriter. He's the sole owner of a mobile poetry business, and for the past three years, he's spent his weekends traveling St. Louis, banging out short poems, on the spot, for anyone who stops by his table.

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Author Interviews
12:25 am
Thu September 5, 2013

'Winter's Bone' Author Revisits A Tragedy In His Ozarks Hometown

Daniel Woodrell's novel Winter's Bone -- a dark family saga set in the Ozarks — was adapted into a film in 2010. Woodrell returned to his hometown of West Plains, Mo., about 20 years ago and has been writing there ever since.
Alexander Klein AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 3:42 pm

The Ozarks mountain town of West Plains, Mo., is the kind of town where a person can stand in his front yard and have a comfortable view of his past.

"My mom was actually born about 150 or 200 feet that way, and my grandfather's house is I guess 200 yards that way," says Daniel Woodrell, author of Winter's Bone, and most recently, The Maid's Version.

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Around the Nation
12:23 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Under Dust And Rust, 'New' Classic Cars Go Up For Auction

Chevrolets are lined up in a field near the Lambrecht Chevrolet dealership in Pierce, Neb. Later this month, bidders will attend a two-day auction that will feature about 500 old cars and trucks, many with fewer than 10 miles on the odometer.
Nati Harnik AP

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 5:11 pm

Inside the Lambrecht Chevrolet Company in tiny Pierce, Neb., under layers of dirt, sit a dozen classic cars. A 1978 Chevrolet Indy Pace Car, black with racing stripes down the side. There's a '66 Bel Air sedan in a color called tropic turquoise, and a 1964 impala.

"If you wipe away the dirt, it's shiny underneath," says auctioneer Yvette VanDerBrink. Even though this car is almost 50 years old, VanDerBrink says, it's still brand new.

Later this month Lambrecht's will auction more than 500 classic cars, many with fewer than 10 miles on the odometer.

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The Two-Way
4:43 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Racist Remark Leads To Spat Between Anthony Weiner, Voter

Anthony Weiner argues with a voter.
YouTube

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 6:56 pm

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Code Switch
4:37 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

College Enrollment Drops Overall, But Spikes Among Latinos

The number of Latino college students has been on a steady uptick since the mid-2000s.
Michael DeLeon iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 7:30 am

Here's the latest dispatch from our country's changing classrooms: Overall, there were half a million fewer students nationwide enrolled in colleges between 2011 and 2012, but the number of Latinos enrolled in college over the same period jumped by 447,000. The numbers come from a recent U.S. Census Bureau report.

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The Two-Way
3:42 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Syria Debate In Congress: 4 Exchanges You Should Listen To

Secretary of State John Kerry waves to members during a hearing on Syria before the House Foreign Affairs Committee on Wednesday in Washington, DC.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Today, it was the U.S. House of Representative's turn to question the Obama administration about its plan for a military strike on Syria.

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Shots - Health News
2:27 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Multitasking After 60: Video Game Boosts Focus, Mental Agility

Strenuous mental exercise like reading difficult books, solving tricky math problems — or, maybe, playing the right video game — can help keep a healthy brain sharp, research suggests.
Images.com/Corbis

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 2:22 pm

A brain that trains can stay in the fast lane. That's the message of a study showing that playing a brain training video game for a month can rejuvenate the multitasking abilities of people in their 60s, 70s and 80s.

"After training, they improved their multitasking beyond the level of 20-year-olds," says Adam Gazzaley, one of the study's authors and a brain scientist at the University of California, San Francisco.

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