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The Bush Administration now offers grants for Americans to study languages such as Arabic. We travel to Cairo where language schools are full of American students. Also, a conversation with self-described language fanatic Elizabeth Little. And a journey through the linguistic politics - and just plain silliness - of the Eurovision Song Contest.

The Business Of Guns In America

May 4, 2016

Most conversations about guns in America follow lines as deeply entrenched as wagon ruts on the Oregon Trail. They focus on the second amendment — on gun control and gun rights — on who should be able to buy what kinds of guns. Historian Pamela Haag set out to do something very different in her new book, “The Gunning of America.”

Time to check your frozen fruit and vegetable packages: CRF Frozen Foods has expanded a voluntary recall to include about 358 products under 42 different brands because of potential listeria contamination.

A full list of the items to avoid was included in the company's press release on Monday. The recall includes all frozen organic and nonorganic fruit and vegetable products manufactured or processed at CRF's facility in Pasco, Wash., since May 1, 2014.

In this edition of The World in Words, linguist Derek Bickerton talks about his lifelong love of creoles and his attempt to create a new language on a desert island. Also former speechwriter Gregory Levey on how he nearly got an Israeli prime minister to channel Seinfeld.
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In this edition of The World in Words: Russian. What names like Putin, Stalin and Medvedev mean. Also, outgoing President Putin likes to quote Russian poetry - as much as seems to enjoy coarse street language. We end with the confessions of a hopelessly unqualified Israeli government speechwriter.
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Just saying the words “secretary of state” might sound sleep-inducing.

But in Oregon, this is also the public official primarily charged with rooting out waste, fraud and inefficiency in state government.

Oregon’s secretary of state is uniquely powerful: Ours is, for example, the only secretary of state in the nation in charge of auditing state government. That might interest voters who said in a recent poll conducted for OPB that, on average, they think 44 cents out of every dollar spent by state government is wasted.

Malheur Occupation Trial Could Last For Months

May 4, 2016

U.S. District Judge Anna Brown is preparing for the trial of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge occupiers to last a long time, possibly months.

Speaking during a pre-trial status hearing Wednesday in Portland, Brown said she still wanted the trial of Ammon Bundy and the other occupiers to begin Sept. 7. But she also discussed how the court would manage breaks for holidays, including Thanksgiving and Christmas, if necessary.

The politics team is back with a quick take to discuss the results of the Indiana primary. And although it's usually the primary winner who makes the headlines, this time around it was the loser. After losing Indiana, Sen. Ted Cruz suspended his campaign, clearing the way for Donald Trump to get the Republican nomination.

Also on the podcast, why Hillary Clinton is still the likely Democratic nominee even though she didn't win the Indiana primary.

On the podcast:

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Al Masirah/Ameen AlShami

On July 3, 2015, Ibrahim Abdulkareem's home was hit by a Saudi airstrike, with his family inside. “It was 1:30 in the morning,” Ibrahim writes in Arabic, “we were sleeping.”

Ibrahim, the father of two, awoke to the sound of his wife screaming. She was pinned under the rubble of their collapsed walls. His son appeared to be OK. But his young daughter was completely buried in plaster and stone. EMTs arrived and they dug her out. The girl, her brother and their mother were rushed to area hospitals.

Bernie Sanders is staying in the race until the last primary and the nation will be better off for it, he told NPR's Steve Inskeep in an interview that will air Thursday on Morning Edition.

Inskeep, passing on questions he had invited on Twitter, asked Sanders if he is "threatening [his] revolution" by continuing to run, potentially scaring some voters away from supporting Hillary Clinton — the likely Democratic nominee — in November.

Panama City is bustling with construction. At least half-a-dozen cranes dot its picturesque, oceanfront skyline, teeming with glass towers.

At one site, real estate broker Kent Davis steps into a construction elevator in a nearly completed 30-floor apartment building. Seventy percent of the apartments have already been sold.

Frozen vegetables are a staple in many diets, so a huge recall of them has us peering at the packages in our freezers.

On Tuesday evening, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced an outbreak of the deadly Listeria monocytogenes bacteria — and frozen vegetables and fruits are believed to be the cause.

Ever wondered how Peter Pan came to be the boy who never grew up? Or how he and Captain Hook came to be archenemies?

We might never know the real reason (at least according to author J.M. Barrie), but writers Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson sure dreamed up a fabulous possibility in the book “Peter and the Starcatcher.” Billed as a "grown-up's prequel," it was adapted for the stage by Rick Elice and ultimately won five Tonys on Broadway in 2012.

Donald Trump will appear at the Lane County fairgrounds for a 7 p.m. rally Friday in Eugene, according to his state director.

Jacob Daniels said that Trump is continuing with his plans to visit the Northwest even though his two Republican rivals — Ted Cruz and John Kasich — have dropped out of the race. Trump still hasn't won a delegate majority and he wants to rack up as big of a margin as he can before the Republican convention.

Trump also plans to visit Washington state on Saturday. But his campaign is having a hard time finding a venue in Vancouver, Washington.

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Topher Seguin/Reuters

It looks like an apocalypse.

A massive wildfire has torn through the city of Fort McMurray, Alberta, forcing more than 80,000 residents to be evacuated. The fire started on Sunday, but no injuries have been reported.

Local officials say 80 percent of the neighborhood of Beacon Hill has been destroyed, but reporter Breanna Karstens-Smith says she has yet to see the other 20 percent.

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