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After 71 hours and 8 minutes of flight time crossing the Atlantic, Solar Impulse 2 has touched down in Seville, Spain. It's a major step toward the team's goal of circumnavigating the globe using only the sun's power.

The end of this leg means they've now completed 90 percent of that journey.

As The Two-Way has reported, the single-seater plane took off from New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport early Monday with pilot Bertrand Piccard at the controls.

The protest that played out Wednesday on Capitol Hill wasn't quite plebiscite by Periscope. But it came close.

Should they stay or should they go?

Today the United Kingdom votes on the so-called Brexit, or the possibility of leaving the European Union.

Polls opened at 7 a.m. local time (2 a.m. ET) and will close at 10 p.m. (5 p.m. ET). British citizens, including some who live abroad, are eligible to vote, as well as citizens of Ireland and Commonwealth countries who live in the U.K. or Gibraltar.

The votes (marked by an X on a paper ballot) are counted by hand, and official results likely won't be known until Friday morning.

Watching For Clues

Five years ago, the residents of a southern Chinese village drew the world's attention when they chased Communist Party officials out of their hamlet and elected a new leader.

Now, the land disputes that spurred them to action remain unresolved, and the residents of Wukan village are rising up in protest once again after their elected leader was detained on corruption charges Saturday.

Today's Morning Edition music is from "Over the Rainbow" by Joey Alexander from his 2015 debut album "My Favorite Things."

Alexander is a native of Bali and he's 12 years old. He's one of the acts that will be featured at the 18th annual Twin Cities Jazz Festival, which begins today.

He'll be playing tonight on the main stage in St. Paul's Mears Park, but there are over two dozen venues, mostly in Lowertown, which will host performances over the next three days.

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José Lebrón and Sheilla Torres had heard the news from Puerto Rico: hospitals aren’t being reimbursed, schools are closing, the official unemployment rate is close to 12 percent, and poverty stands at 45 percent. But a year ago they decided to move back to their island anyway.

The Challenge Of Taking Health Apps Beyond The Well-Heeled

Jun 23, 2016

When you hear the phrase "digital health," you might think about a Fitbit, the healthy eating app on your smartphone, or maybe a new way to email the doctor.

But Fitbits aren't particularly useful if you're homeless, and the nutrition app won't mean much to someone who struggles to pay for groceries. Same for emailing your doctor if you don't have a doctor or reliable Internet access.

Gregory "Buster" Coleman is a cop who's been through a lot.

He was the Liberian National Police Commissioner during the Ebola outbreak.

He and his men would wear protective equipment when they were out on patrol during the epidemic. But the garb is "not made for policing," says the robust 36-year-old. "If we had to make a difficult arrest the suit could tear." He paused. "Every night I would have to strip outside my house, be sprayed down with chlorine then shower before I could even greet my children."

That was a bit unnerving.

So was going to Harvard.

Fred Bergsten, senior fellow and director emeritus of the Peterson Institute For International Economics, discusses Hillary Clinton's and Donald Trump's foreign policy positions on China.

Should Europe close its doors to migrants?

Jun 23, 2016
M
Italian Navy/Reuters

Europe is wrestling with what to do about migration. The world now has more refugees and displaced people than at any time in history: 65 million to be precise. And millions more people are trying to get away from poverty and crime in many parts of Africa and Asia.

Many Europeans have strong humanitarian instincts, and want to help the world’s poor and suffering. But these instincts conflict with fears of the cultural transformation that might result from mass migration. In other words, politicians are scared of a right-wing backlash.

Updated at 1:15 p.m.

House Democrats have ended their almost 26-hour-long sit-in to push for gun control legislation, pledging on Thursday afternoon to continue their fight once Congress returns from the July Fourth recess.

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., ended the daylong protest surrounded by his Democratic colleagues. The civil rights leader proclaimed that this "is a struggle, but we're going to win this struggle."

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It's the nation's largest statewide transit agency. It provides nearly a million rides each weekday to people living in the country's most densely populated state. But instead of having a sustainable funding source, NJ Transit regularly faces budget gaps — and this year is no different.

"The number is $46.3, just to nail it down," Mike Lihvarcik, the agency's chief financial officer, told reporters at a meeting earlier this month.

"My goal for this special session is to keep the schools open," said Sam Brownback, Republican governor of Kansas, talking about a high-stakes gathering today in Topeka.

He called lawmakers back from their vacations for a special session after the state's Supreme Court doubled-down on its demand that they make school funding more equitable across districts or risk a calamitous funding freeze.

"We cannot allow our children to be caught in a constitutional struggle between branches of government," Brownback said. But that's exactly what's happened.

Jacob Collier first attracted attention with endearing homemade music videos that feature his versions of classic songs by Stevie Wonder, Michael Jackson and others. Now 21, the multi-instrumentalist is seen in his family's well-stocked music room, playing every instrument.

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