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11:57 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Archaeologists Unearth What May Be Oldest Roman Temple

Excavation at the Sant'Omobono site in central Rome has provided evidence of early Romans' efforts to transform the landscape of their city.
Sylvia Poggioli NPR

Originally published on Wed January 29, 2014 9:49 am

Archaeologists excavating a site in central Rome say they've uncovered what may be oldest known temple from Roman antiquity.

Along the way, they've also discovered how much the early Romans intervened to shape their urban environment.

And the dig has been particularly challenging because the temple lies below the water table.

At the foot Capitoline Hill in the center of Rome, stands the Medieval Sant'Omobono church.

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The Edge
11:55 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Too Far, Too Complicated: Why Some Families Will Sit Out Sochi

Security personnel sit in the back of a truck outside the Fisht Olympic Stadium in Sochi. Security concerns are one reason why many U.S. fans and family are not going to this year's games.
David J. Phillip AP

Originally published on Wed January 29, 2014 10:52 am

On a frigid afternoon, Jack Burke is coaching young skiers in a field in Saranac Lake, N.Y. His son Tim — who shoots and skis as part of the U.S. biathlon team — got his start training here. Now, Tim is off to Sochi to compete, but Jack and his whole family are staying home, missing the games for the first time since Tim's first Olympics in 2006.

"The uncertainty certainly did weigh into it," says Jack. "The cost was substantial, and costs seemed to be changing weekly."

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Around the Nation
11:54 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

On The Plains, The Rush For Oil Has Changed Everything

Diners at Lonnie's Roadhouse Cafe eat breakfast before heading to work in Williston, N.D.
Annie Flanagan for NPR

Originally published on Wed January 29, 2014 9:49 am

A remarkable transformation is underway in western North Dakota, where an oil boom is changing the state's fortunes and leaving once-sleepy towns bursting at the seams. In a series of stories, NPR is exploring the economic, social and environmental demands of this modern-day gold rush.

On a Sunday at dusk, Amtrak's eastbound Empire Builder train is jampacked, filled with people heading to their jobs in North Dakota towns like Minot, Williston and Watford City.

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It's All Politics
11:23 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Inside The State Of The Union: What The President Proposed

President Obama delivers his State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress on Tuesday.
Jim Lo Scalzo EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed January 29, 2014 9:49 am

After a long spell of partisan trench warfare and gridlock, President Obama called for "a year of action" Tuesday as he focused on themes that are central to his second-term agenda. The changes he proposed in his annual State of the Union speech were relatively modest, but flashes of ambition showed in his promise to move forward, with or without Congress, to address issues of income inequality.

Here's what President Obama proposed on the policy front:

Minimum Wage

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The Two-Way
9:02 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

WATCH: Obama Tells The Story Of A Wounded Soldier

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 10:19 pm

There was one moment during President Obama's State of the Union speech on Tuesday that overcame all the bitter division and cynicism of Washington.

It happened when Obama spoke about Army Ranger Cory Remsburg, who was almost killed by a roadside bomb during his 10th deployment to Afghanistan.

Sitting next to first lady Michelle Obama, Remsburg received two minutes of applause from the chamber.

Despite surgeries and struggles Remsburg never quit, Obama said.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
2:56 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

A Human-Driven Mass Extinction: Good Or Bad?

Will the distant future give rise to exhibits of a human past long gone, much as we gawk today at representations of a dinosaur age we can only imagine?
Aamir Qureshi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 11:26 am

Odds are good that there's a mass extinction going on right now. It will be only one of six in the entire history of the planet. In the past these great die-offs have been caused by asteroid impacts and rapid, devastating climate change driven by volcanism.

This time it's driven by you and me.

How does that make you feel? How should that make you feel? The answer to this question depends mightily on what you think of as nature and where you think we fit into it.

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World
2:56 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Living In The Spirit Of Daniel Pearl

Daniel Pearl and Asra Nomani in Karachi in 2001
Courtesy Asra Nomani

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 2:02 pm

It has been more than a decade since Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl was kidnapped and brutally murdered in Pakistan. On January 23, 2002, he left the house of his friend and colleague, Asra Nomani, for an interview but never returned.

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NPR Story
2:55 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

CDC Director: China Bird Flu Outbreak Closely Watched

A security guard closes the gate of a live poultry market in Cheung Sha Wan before officials proceed to cull chickens in Hong Kong on January 28, 2014. Hong Kong began a mass cull of 20,000 chickens after the deadly H7N9 bird flu virus was discovered in poultry imported from mainland China, authorities said. (Phillipe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 2:15 pm

H7N9, a new strain of the bird flu, is spreading through China in advance of celebrations of the Lunar New Year, this Friday. Both travel and chicken sales spike in China around this time.

The strain jumped from birds to humans last year, and according to the World Health organization, 246 people in mainland China have been sickened and 56 people have died since the disease was first reported in Shanghai. Cases have also been reported in Taiwan and in Hong Kong.

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NPR Story
2:55 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

In Washington State, A Perpetual Campaign To Push Liberal Agenda

Staff at Fuse Washington meet to update their communications and community organizing efforts. (Austin Jenkins/Northwest News Network)

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 2:15 pm

You’ve heard of Karl Rove’s Crossroads GPS and other issue advocacy groups that don’t have to publicly disclose their donors. They are transforming American politics.

These political non-profits also exist at the state level. But much of this activity is coming from the left, not the right. And instead of TV ad campaigns, the work is largely happening online and on the ground.

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Business
2:54 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

A Chinese Company Brings Hope To Former GM Workers In Ohio

An abandoned General Motors automotive assembly plant near Dayton, Ohio, will soon become home to Fuyao Auto Glass, a Chinese windshield maker.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 3:55 pm

For years, industrial cities across the U.S. have watched factories pack up and leave, taking their operations to Mexico or China. But here's something relatively new: increasing numbers of Chinese companies are bringing manufacturing to the United States.

Just south of Dayton, Ohio, a Chinese auto-glass maker now plans to open up shop in what used to be a large General Motors truck plant.

The announcement is a big deal for this former factory town.

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The Salt
2:53 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Food Stamp Cuts, Cold Weather Put Extra Strain On Food Pantries

Harlem residents choose free groceries at the Food Bank For New York City in December.
John Moore/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 31, 2014 8:10 am

Scrounging to feed yourself and your family can be brutal. But add the bone-chilling cold to it and it's a whole other level of misery.

Unfortunately, many American families are suffering from the double whammy this week as a deep freeze descends on most of the nation.

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Shots - Health News
2:45 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

The Strange Case Of Marlise Munoz And John Peter Smith Hospital

Erick Munoz, flanked by lawyers, walks to 96th District Court last Friday. A judge ordered a Texas hospital to remove life support from his wife, Marlise.
Tim Sharp AP

Originally published on Wed January 29, 2014 12:37 pm

It would have been hard to find a happier man than Erick Munoz on that Tuesday morning before Thanksgiving.

With a healthy and delightful son toddling around the house, and his beautiful and successful wife pregnant with their second child, the fire department paramedic had everything in life that's really important. So it must have been with a feeling of disbelief and horror that Munoz knelt across the nearly lifeless body of his wife, Marlise, on the kitchen floor at 2 a.m., his fingers linking across her heart, arms pumping away in vain.

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Food Traditions
2:15 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Chinese New Year With Chef Ming Tsai

Chef Ming Tsai prepares food in the Here & Now kitchen. (Jesse Costa/Here & Now)

Originally published on Wed January 29, 2014 10:15 am

This Friday marks the beginning of the year 4712 in the Chinese Calendar, the year of the horse. James Beard Award-winning chef Ming Tsai joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson in the studio to discuss some of the customs of Chinese New Year, as well as the Mandarin, Hunan, Szechwan and Cantonese cuisines.

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NPR Story
2:15 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Kentucky Highlands Becomes Both 'Promise' And 'Empowerment' Zone

Earlier this month, parts of southeastern Kentucky were named a “Promise Zone” by President Obama. Twenty years ago, President Bill Clinton named neighboring parts of the Kentucky Highlands an “Empowerment Zone.”

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NPR Story
2:15 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

One Year In, Vine Has Reasons To Celebrate

Vine, the app that lets users create and share six-second videos, celebrated its first birthday recently. Vine is owned by Twitter and boasts 40 million users, including celebrities and politicians like President Obama.

It’s also created its own celebrities, including Nicolas Megalis whose video Gummy Money has 2.2 million “likes.”

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