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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We'd like to turn now to personal finance. We've been hearing a lot about identity theft in recent years. Law enforcement says it's one of the fastest growing crimes, and it can have serious repercussions. Victims of identity theft have often been denied credit they deserve and even jobs, not to mention the hours of time spent writing letters and making telephone calls to clean up the mess.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. It's commencement season. You might be headed to one this weekend. And while you're probably most concerned with seeing your loved one get that piece of paper, these days many students and faculty are showing new interest in who offers those often banal but still widely noted commencement remarks.

Update at 4:57 p.m. ET. Federal Court Halts Execution:

With just hours to go, a federal court has halted the execution of Texas inmate Robert Campbell.

The execution would have been the first since Oklahoma botched one in April.

The ruling has nothing to do with the drug shortage that's dominated the narrative over the death penalty in the country. Instead, Campbell's lawyers argued that the state knew that Campbell was intellectually disabled but did not let his defense team know that.

Oregon's Wandering Wolf May Have Met His Mate

May 13, 2014

Oregon's famous lone wolf isn't so lonely anymore.

Biologists say it appears the wandering wolf OR-7 has found himself a mate.

Their evidence came from trail cameras set up in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest in Southern Oregon.

The cameras captured an image of a black wolf in the area where they've been tracking OR-7 with a GPS collar. Then they captured an image of that same wolf squatting to pee.

It's been missing for more than 500 years. But now there are reports that the Santa Maria, the largest ship among the trio that made Christopher Columbus' first expedition to North America, may be found. Undersea explorer Barry Clifford says he thinks he has found the ship in waters off of Haiti's coast.

If you've come to treat that daily glass of wine as your fountain of youth, it may be time to reconsider.

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Human Rights Watch says evidence "strongly suggests" the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad used chemical weapons against his own people in mid-April.

The group, which investigates allegations of human rights abuses, says the rebels do not have the helicopters used to drop the barrel bombs used on three northern cities.

People have the right to have data about them deleted from online databases, the European Court of Justice says, in a ruling issued against Google on Tuesday. The search company had fought a Spanish court's order to remove links to online newspaper articles in a case that began in 2011.

"A Spanish man brought this case, arguing that Google's search results infringed on his privacy," NPR's Ari Shapiro reports for our Newscast unit. "A search of his name brought up an auction notice of his repossessed home from 16 years ago."

In the first criminal conviction of a former Israeli prime minister, Ehud Olmert was sentenced to six years in prison Tuesday for taking bribes related to a real estate deal. The formal case against Olmert stretches back to 2008, when he resigned from office under a cloud.

Olmert, 68, says he'll appeal his punishment, which includes a fine of 1 million shekels ($290,000), reports Israel's Haaretz. He was found guilty of the crime in March.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Godzilla better watch out. With a Hollywood version of the cult Japanese monster hitting theaters, U.S. airmen at Kadena Air Base in Japan say they're ready should Godzilla actually rise from the sea. One sergeant suggested to Smithsonian's Air and Space magazine that the Power Rangers might be available, though Chuck Norris is also an obvious choice. Plus, there's air power. The base is home to 50 F15 fighter jets. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The video released by extremist group Boko Haram on Monday, showing more than 100 girls abducted from their school in Nigeria last month, included a girl whose mother has identified her, says a representative of the parents of the kidnapped girls.

NPR's Mara Liasson interviewed top Democratic ad man Jim Margolis recently as part of her research for a story about political advertising aimed at women.

Much of the interview didn't make the final radio piece, but the picture he painted of the not-too-distant political future was fascinating — and a little unsettling.

Here are some excerpts from that interview:

Conservative money has poured into Nebraska's Republican Senate primary race.

Big GOP names like Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell are on opposite sides.

And the attack ads have been brutal — including one that took a page directly from the Swift-boating of John Kerry's military record during his 2004 presidential run.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Cincinnati police finally caught on to Marc Corsmeier. He was a parking meter attendant. He collected quarters people fed in and he now admits keeping $50 per week for himself. Fifty dollars per week for eight years is around $20,000. The Cincinnati Enquirer says police caught Mr. Corsmeier after a tip from a convenient store owner. Corsmeier used that store and apparently he always paid in quarters.

You're listening to MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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