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The Two-Way
10:27 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Taliban Release Video Of Captured 'American Military Dog'

The Taliban holding what they claim is a U.S. military dog.
YouTube

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 7:38 am

It may be the first time a canine has been used in a prisoner of war video.

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The Salt
10:06 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Subway Phasing Out Bread Additive After Blogger Flags Health Concerns

Sandwich chain Subway has announced plans to drop the additive azodicarbonamide from its fresh-baked breads. Above, Subway founder Fred DeLuca poses carrying bread for sandwiches.
Jonathan Nackstrand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 1:19 pm

Food industry, beware of the power of the online petition.

Just a few days after food blogger Vani Hari, known as Food Babe, created a buzz with an online petition raising questions about the safety of a food additive commonly used in commercial baking, sandwich giant Subway has announced plans to phase it out of its fresh-baked breads.

The additive, azodicarbonamide, is used by the commercial baking industry to bleach flour and condition dough.

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Parallels
9:58 am
Thu February 6, 2014

From Projects To Parliament, Britain's 'Rev. Rose' Breaks Barriers

The Rev. Rose Hudson-Wilkin outside her home in Hackney, England. The first woman and the first person of color to serve as chaplain to the queen and in the House of Commons moves between those rarefied worlds and that of the poverty- and crime-ridden parish in East London that she continues to run.
Godong UIG via Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 8, 2014 8:39 am

Parliament in London is an old-fashioned place. When members gather in the House of Commons, the sea of faces is generally wrinkled, white and male.

The chaplain who leads them each day in prayer is emphatically not.

The Rev. Rose Hudson-Wilkin is the first black woman to serve as chaplain to the speaker in the House of Commons. She broke the same barrier when she was appointed chaplain to Queen Elizabeth II. She was also the first woman, and the first person of color, to run her parish in Northeast London.

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Sochi Olympics
9:42 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Olympic Events Kick Off Under Shadow Of Security Concerns

The morning sun shines on a different kind of Olympic rings at the games in Sochi, Russia.
Robert Smith NPR

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 8:06 am

Olympic competition began under gorgeous blue skies Thursday in Sochi, with snowboarders soaring in a new event for the games — slopestyle. Boarders performed the remarkable tricks and twists that make slopestyle a thrill to watch. American Chas Guldemond placed fifth in the first heat, qualifying him for Saturday's semifinals.

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NBC
9:42 am
Thu February 6, 2014

All Work, No Respect: Twice Pushed Out, Jay Leno Moves On From 'Tonight'

Jimmy Fallon appears with Jay Leno on one of the latter's final Tonight Shows.
Chris Haston NBC

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 12:45 pm

Not many people can say they got pushed out of a job twice while at the top of their game. But Jay Leno, the famously workaholic host of NBC's Tonight Show, is one who can.

By most measures, he should be one of the Peacock Network's most powerful stars; for 22 years – with one small break — he's hosted the highest-rated late-night show on television. Even as profits have sagged in recent years, the Tonight Show franchise pulls in $125 million in revenue, according to Kantar Media (that figure, however, is down from $255-million in 2007).

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Books News & Features
9:41 am
Thu February 6, 2014

'Possessed By Genius': A Centennial Tribute To William S. Burroughs

William S. Burroughs' cult novel Naked Lunch has sold more than 1 million copies since its publication in 1959.
Evening Standard Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 7:23 pm

William S. Burroughs was a counterculture icon: In more than two dozen books, including the landmark novel Naked Lunch, he laid down an original vision that influenced everyone from political activists to punk rockers, filmmakers to sci-fi writers.

In 1962, writer Norman Mailer described him as "the only American novelist living today who may conceivably be possessed by genius."

Burroughs was born 100years ago Wednesday.

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Performing Arts
9:29 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater Kicks Off New Tour

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Beauty Shop
9:29 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Mean Girls Online: Can We Draw A Line In Social Media?

Feminists criticizing feminists online: How does it impact the movement?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 5:57 am

Last week, an article about online feminist activism set off a heated debate. The Nation's Michelle Goldberg examined criticism aimed at feminists by other feminists. "Is it good for the movement? And whose movement is it?" Goldberg asked.

She wrote:

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Technology
9:29 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Hackathon Organizers Ask, Could A Smart Phone App Have Saved Trayvon?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
9:25 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Sony Will Shed 5,000 Jobs And Its PC Business

Sony Corp. President and CEO Kazuo Hirai during a press conference at Sony headquarters in Tokyo on Thursday.
Shizuo Kambayashi AP

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 10:47 am

The struggling electronics and entertainment company Sony announced it had suffered an annual loss of $1 billion and that it was selling its PC business and shedding 5,000 more jobs globally.

The Associated Press adds:

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Business
9:03 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Columbia River Native Fish Shop Opens This Weekend

Native entrepreneur Kim Brigham Campbell is opening her own brick-and-mortar fish shop in Cascade Locks, Oregon. The store will open at noon on Feb. 8.
Anna King Northwest News Network

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 3:19 pm

In the Northwest, Native Americans have caught and traded fish along the banks of the Columbia River for eons. Nowadays, natives sell just-caught fish out of coolers roadside.

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The Two-Way
8:35 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Luxury Carmaker Aston Martin Cites Fake Chinese Plastics In Recall

An Aston Martin Rapide S, one of the models affected by the recall, is displayed outside the Aston Martin production facility in Gaydon, England, in February 2013.
Darren Staples Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 4:43 pm

Aston Martin, James Bond's conveyance of choice, has expanded its recall of vehicles built since 2007 because of problems with fake plastics from China.

In a letter last month to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, Aston Martin said it had received reports that throttle pedal arms broke during installation, and it discovered that "initial tests on the failed pedal arm have shown that the Tier Three Supplier used counterfeit material."

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The Two-Way
8:25 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Stolen Stradivarius Found By Milwaukee Police

A Stradivarius violin is pictured in December 2009 at the restoration and research laboratory of the Musee de la Musique in Paris.
Patrick Kovarik AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 8:26 am

Police in Milwaukee have recovered "Lipinski" – a 300-year-old Stradivarius stolen last month from a concertmaster as he was walking to his car with the rare violin.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, quoting law enforcement officials, says the instrument has been found:

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The Protojournalist
8:12 am
Thu February 6, 2014

Sonic Dictionary: An Aural History Project

Brooke Watson of Duke University gathers sound for the Sonic Dictionary.
Mary Caton Lingold

If you don't know the meaning of a word, says Mary Caton Lingold, you can look it up in the dictionary, but if you don't know what a particular sound sounds like, where do you go? (Besides NPR, of course.)

For instance: What does tobacco harvesting sound like? Or someone clogging? Or a shotgun?

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Seattle Hosts American Booksellers Association
7:31 am
Thu February 6, 2014

What Are Indie Booksellers Like At Parties?

Stacks of books on a store table.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed February 5, 2014 6:36 am

Martha Woodroof has been writing about the First Novel Experience. For this post, she reports on her travels to the American Booksellers Association's Winter Institute in January.

The American Booksellers Association Winter Institute was billed as providing independent booksellers with a chance to get together "...in vibrant Seattle for three-plus days of networking, special events, and professional development."

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