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It's All Politics
5:19 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Friday Morning Political Mix

House Republicans, led by Speaker John Boehner, took steps to talk with Democrats with the goal of ending the fiscal impasse.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 6:05 am

Happy Friday, fellow political junkies. It's the 11th day of the partial federal government shutdown, 2013 edition.

President Obama and House Republicans at least opened a line of communications before the second week of the shutdown ended, so that was good news.

Less positive was that it came only a week before the Oct. 17 expiration date Treasury Secretary Jack Lew gave for when he would run out of tricks to keep the U.S. government from defaulting on its obligations.

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The Two-Way
4:49 am
Fri October 11, 2013

No Deal Yet, But Maybe An Opening

Speaker of the House John Boehner during a news conference with members of the House Republican leadership at the U.S. Capitol on Thursday morning.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 1:37 pm

It's groundhog day — again — in Washington. Friday is playing out a lot like Thursday — that is, a lot of sound and fury, but very little clarity about what it all signifies.

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The Two-Way
4:36 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Chemical Weapons Watchdog Gets Nobel Peace Prize

A United Nations vehicle carrying inspectors from the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) leaves a hotel in Damascus, on Wednesday. Some 19 OPCW arms experts are in Syria and have started to destroy weapons production facilities.
Louai Behara AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 8:05 am

The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, a watchdog group that is overseeing efforts in Syria to eliminate its chemical stockpile, has won the Nobel Peace Prize.

The group, based in The Hague, Netherlands, was formed in 1997. "Since then the OPCW has, through inspections, destruction and by other means, sought the implementation of the convention. 189 states have acceded to the convention to date," the Nobel committee said.

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Religion
4:13 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Vatican Recalls Pope Medallions Because Of Typo

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 8:02 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. To commemorate the new pope, the Vatican minted thousands of medallions in gold, silver and bronze. A portrait of Francis was on one side and on the other, the Latin phrase that inspired Pope Francis to join the Jesuit order and become a priest. The medals went on sale this week and were promptly recalled after the Vatican discovered a typo: Jesus was misspelled as Lesus, with an L. One wit tweeted: I blame the Lesuits. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
4:06 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Your Chance To Lash Out At Congress

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep with a chance to say what you think. Amid the federal shutdown, a website called DrunkDialCongress.org offers an outlet for frustration. You enter your phone number and get a call with a message.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: When I drink I like to tell people what's on my mind. So in a minute, we're going to forward you to a member of the House of Representatives.

INSKEEP: You're connected to the office of a randomly chosen member of Congress, though you must supply alcohol yourself.

Shots - Health News
3:57 am
Fri October 11, 2013

What Humans Can Learn From A Simple Kiss

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 10:14 am

At a basic level, kissing is a biohazard. What is love then, if not the willingness to expose yourself to a host of nasty diseases lurking in your partner's mouth?

But could kissing also be a tool with a purpose?

Psychology graduate student Rafael Wlodarski, from the University of Oxford, wanted to find out. Results from his experiments supported two of the existing hypotheses about why we kiss. First, we kiss to assess potential mates. Second, we kiss the mate we've found to maintain attachment.

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Around the Nation
3:48 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Denver Mayor To Propose Outlawing Free Marijuana

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now we have an update this morning on Colorado's legalization of marijuana. This week we told you opponents of a proposed marijuana tax have been handing out free joints at rallies in Colorado. An ethics group is insisting the pot must disclosed as a campaign contribution. And now the mayor of Denver wants to act. Mayor Michael Hancock tells our friends at Colorado Public Radio he's proposing to outlaw handouts of free weed in city parks.

Movie Reviews
1:02 am
Fri October 11, 2013

'Captain Phillips' Review And Why Boston's Accent Isn't Easy

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Back in 2009, you may recall, Somali pirates boarded the cargo ship Alabama. The tension between the pirates and the American captain, Richard Phillips, is the basis for a new film in theaters this weekend, and critic Kenneth Turan has our review.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

KENNETH TURAN, BYLINE: The cargo ship Alabama is headed down the east coast of Africa when Captain Richard Phillips, played by Tom Hanks, sees something no captain in these waters wants to see.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "CAPTAIN PHILLIPS")

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Business
1:02 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Commissions From Managed-Futures Market Can Wipe Out Profits

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's hear, next, about investors who try to diversify their portfolios but may have only enriched their advisers. Some brokers and firms have been encouraging customers to invest in managed futures. Those are basically investments in futures contracts, such as gold, or global currencies or pork bellies. They are sold as a way to minimize risk.

David Evans of Bloomberg says, in reality, they've been a bad deal.

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Around the Nation
1:02 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Web Glitches Hinder Mississippians Signing Up For Insurance

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 8:02 am

Transcript

JEFFREY HESS, BYLINE: I'm Jeffrey Hess in Jackson, Mississippi which is one of the 34 states letting the federal government take the lead in establishing a health insurance exchange. Heavy web traffic and software problems have made it nearly impossible to use the new web site since it opened last week.

MEREDITH STARK: Why I keep trying is because this is something we need.

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StoryCorps
11:59 pm
Thu October 10, 2013

A Grandmother, Her Grandson And Fitting In — Together

Barbara Handelsman, 80, and her grandson Aaron Handelsman, 20 — birds of a feather.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 8:52 am

Growing up, Barbara Handelsman often felt out of step with her family.

"When I was really little, I thought my sister always had all the power because she was pudgy and cute, where I had all elbows and knees," Barbara says. "I was so shy. I had no idea how to be the popular kid, and so I felt incompetent when it came to trying to be an A+ anything."

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Around the Nation
11:58 pm
Thu October 10, 2013

The Shutdown News Isn't All Bad For A Few American Indian Tribes

Mariluisa and Andrea Caricchia traveled 6,000 miles from Italy to spend their honeymoon at the Grand Canyon. Instead, they are exploring tribal land.
Laurel Morales KJZZ

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 8:16 am

Grand Canyon National Park is closed for the government shutdown, but tourists determined to see it can take in views from reservation land. The Hualapai Tribe owns Grand Canyon West, where visitors can venture onto a Plexiglas horseshoe walkway that stretches out over the chasm below.

On the east side of the Grand Canyon, visitors are flocking to the Navajo Nation, where Nita Rodriguez gives a tour.

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All Tech Considered
11:57 pm
Thu October 10, 2013

3-D Printing A Masterwork For Your Living Room

Cosmo Wenman generated this 3-D model of the Ares Borghese, based on hundreds of photos, from the Basel Sculpture Hall. Wenman publishes the scans online, so that anyone can use them to 3-D print a replica of the masterpiece.
Courtesy of Cosmo Wenman

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 9:22 am

You may never be able to get to Italy to see Michelangelo's David — but advances in 3-D printing technology are making it possible for you to create an almost perfect replica.

It's an idea that Cosmo Wenman is hoping will catch on. He's pushing the edges of how 3-D printing can be used to make classic works accessible.

I followed Wenman on an excursion to the Cantor Center for Visual Arts at Stanford University. These days, a lot of museums let people take photos of art, and Wenman takes a lot of them.

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NPR Story
5:33 pm
Thu October 10, 2013

What's Behind The Partisan Thaw In Washington?

On Thursday, President Obama met with Senate Democrats. Then he met with House Republicans. And White House staff members continued talks with their counterparts from the House GOP leadership. All that talking just a day after there was radio silence between the two parties. One strong possibility for the change in attitudes is a new NBC/Wall Street Journal poll that shows that the majority of Americans blame Republicans for the ongoing government shutdown and just 20 percent of people approve of the Republican party.

Shots - Health News
5:33 pm
Thu October 10, 2013

Shutdown Imperils Costly Lab Mice, Years Of Research

Bob Adams is a lab animal veterinarian at Johns Hopkins University.
Maggie Starbard NPR

The government shutdown is likely to mean an early death for thousands of mice used in research on diseases such as diabetes, cancer and Alzheimer's.

Federal research centers including the National Institutes of Health will have to kill some mice to avoid overcrowding, researchers say. Others will die because it is impossible to maintain certain lines of genetically altered mice without constant monitoring by scientists. And most federal scientists have been banned from their own labs since Oct. 1.

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