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Europe
4:29 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Three U.S. Economists Win Nobel Prize

Americans Eugene Fama, Lars Peter Hansen and Robert Shiller won the Nobel prize for economics on Monday for developing new methods to study trends in asset markets.

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said the three had laid the foundation of the current understanding of asset prices.

While it's hard to predict whether stock or bond prices will go up or down in the short term, it's possible to foresee movements over periods of three years or longer, the academy said.

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Europe
3:37 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Man Leaves Wife Accidentally At Gas Station

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. If you've forgotten to replace the fuel cap at the gas station, you could do worse. A German man was driving back from his honeymoon in France. He pulled over to fuel up, thinking his bride, sleeping in the back seat, remained put. She actually got out to use the facilities. He drove on, and two and a half hours later, he noticed his wife was gone. The man called police, who said she was patiently waiting back at the gas station. This is probably not what she meant when she said, no better or for worse.

Around the Nation
3:24 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Chiefs Break Record For Loudest NFL Stadium

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Kansas City football fans broke the record yesterday for loudest stadium in the NFL. Fans of the Chiefs were recorded howling at over 137 decibels as the Chiefs defeated Oakland. Now, you may wonder just how loud 137 decibels is. That's considered beyond the threshold of pain, louder than a loud rock concert, almost as loud as a jet engine, and nearly as annoying as two soccer fans with vuvuzelas.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Asia
1:31 am
Mon October 14, 2013

China Experiences Surprise Drop In Exports

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a slide in Chinese exports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: Chinese exports showed a surprise drop last month, according to government figures.

As NPR's Frank Langfitt reports, the September numbers underscore some of the challenges facing the world's second-largest economy.

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Media
1:21 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Readers Lament 'International Herald Tribune' Name Change

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The International Herald Tribune is about to change its name. In these difficult days for print journalism, fans of the Paris-based English newspaper are grateful that it's still being published. But the change is prompting a good bit of nostalgia.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley in Paris explains why.

(SOUNDBITE OF FOOTSTEPS)

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Planet Money
1:21 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Prize In Economics A Latecomer To Nobel Lineup

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Later this morning, the winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics will be announced in Sweden. Unlike some other Nobel Prizes we've heard about in recent days, this one comes with an asterisk. And NPR's Robert Smith is covering the story. He's in New York. Hi, Robert.

ROBERT SMITH, BYLINE: Hey, it's good to be here.

INSKEEP: Why is there an asterisk over the Nobel Prize in Economics?

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Politics
12:23 am
Mon October 14, 2013

How The Debt Limit Became 'A Nuclear-Tipped Leverage Point'

Congress set a limit on how much debt the U.S. Treasury could accrue back in 1917.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 3:14 pm

Political battles over the debt limit have been around nearly as long as the law passed by Congress in 1917 that set a statutory limit for how much debt the Treasury could accrue.

Since then, Congress has had to increase that limit on more than 100 occasions — and 40 of those times, lawmakers have tried to tie strings to raising the debt ceiling. In the last few years, though, there's been a marked escalation in those demands.

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Shots - Health News
12:22 am
Mon October 14, 2013

So What's The Real Deadline For Obamacare Sign-Up?

Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Originally published on Wed October 16, 2013 10:06 am

The health exchanges are now open, though some have a lot of glitches. You still have lots of questions about how the Affordable Care Act affects you and your family.

And we have answers. In our ongoing series, we're addressing questions you've asked about the sign-up process.

With people having so much trouble logging onto the websites to get coverage, some are wondering how soon they have to sign up for coverage to avoid the potential penalties.

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Parallels
12:21 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Iran's Leaders Send Sobering Message: No Quick Economic Fix

Two Iranian textile merchants wait for customers in Tehran's main bazaar. President Hassan Rouhani has raised hopes by reaching out to the West and promising to work for an end to sanctions. But his team has cautioned that the country's economic problems have deep roots.
Vahid Salemi AP

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 1:21 am

The U.S. and its Western allies have not been able to win the nuclear concessions they have sought from Iran. But they have been able to inflict considerable economic pain through sanctions.

But now, Iran's call for a nuclear agreement and an end to sanctions has raised hopes among Iranians that better economic times may be ahead. The Iranian currency has stabilized somewhat since the election of President Hassan Rouhani, although inflation and unemployment remain high.

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Africa
12:20 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Kenyan President Faced Justice With Help Of Secret Envelope

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 7:32 am

Kenya's deputy president William Ruto is back before the International Criminal Court in The Hague on Monday. He and his boss, President Uhuru Kenyatta, face charges of instigating and financing deadly tribal violence in Kenya after that country's disputed 2007 election.

But their cases might never have reached this stage if not for one Kenyan judge and a remarkable disappearing act.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
12:20 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Holding Onto The Other Half Of 'Mixed-Race'

Wilma Stordahl with her sons (from left) Kevin, Kazon and Kenneth at Kazon's high school graduation. "We think of Norwegians as being tall and blond and blue-eyed," Stordahl says. "My sons are tall — but they're not blond and blue-eyed."
Courtesy of Wilma Stordahl

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 9:14 am

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

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Shots - Health News
12:19 am
Mon October 14, 2013

Exercise May Help Knees More Than Glucosamine And Chondroitin

With osteoarthritis, knees become swollen and stiff, and cartilage can degenerate.
Ted Kinsman Science Source

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 6:18 am

If you're among the estimated 27 million Americans who suffer from osteoarthritis of the knee or hip, then perhaps you've tried the nutritional supplements glucosamine and chondroitin. They've been marketed for joint health for about 20 years, and sales are still brisk. But do they help?

Some horses might say yes. The supplements were first tried in horses, and there's some evidence that the supplements might improve joint function for them.

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Asia
10:40 pm
Sun October 13, 2013

Death Toll In India Temple Stampede Rises

A stampede on a bridge outside a Hindu temple in India killed more than 100 people on Sunday. Many of the victims leapt to their deaths in the water below.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 11:16 pm

The death toll from a stampede near a temple in central India rose to 109 after many of the injured succumbed, an official said Monday.

Thousands of Hindu pilgrims were crossing a bridge leading to a temple in Madhya Pradesh state on Sunday when they panicked at rumors the bridge would collapse, triggering a stampede.

The district medical officer R.S. Gupta said that autopsies had been carried out on 109 bodies by late Sunday.

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The Two-Way
3:43 pm
Sun October 13, 2013

Israel Discovers Tunnel Leading To Gaza, Army Says

A view of a tunnel reportedly dug by Palestinians beneath the border between the Gaza Strip and Israel and recently uncovered by Israeli troops, on Sunday.
David Buimovitch AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 5:29 am

Israeli military officials announced Sunday that they have discovered an underground tunnel that leads from the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip into Israel. They say the tunnel could have been used for an attack against Israelis.

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Movie Interviews
3:12 pm
Sun October 13, 2013

Alan Rickman On 'CBGB' And The Importance Of Listening

Alan Rickman tells NPR's Arun Rath he wasn't familiar with CBGB or the punk scene until he began working on the film.
Beau Giann XLrator Media

After several failed musical ventures and two bankruptcies, New Yorker Hilly Kristal decided to try something new. In 1973, he opened a bar in Lower Manhattan intended to showcase sounds not so indigenous to the urban landscape: country, bluegrass and blues. And so came the name for the dive bar CBGB.

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