NPR News | KUOW News and Information

NPR News

The 82,500-acre Elliott State Forest in southwestern Oregon may be staying in public hands after all.

Treasurer Tobias Read — who cast a crucial vote last month to proceed with the sale — announced Tuesday that he sees a "path forward" for keeping the forest in public hands.

Read said in an interview that it is too early to proclaim certainty that the forest would remain public, but he added, "I would not be making this statement if I did not think that I had a reasonable degree of confidence that this is achievable."

R
Mike Segar/Reuters

The former head of United Nations climate negotiations says the Trump administration executive order rolling back energy regulations won’t derail the landmark Paris climate change agreement.

Christiana Figueres, who led nearly 200 countries to a hard-fought international climate change agreement in December 2015, says the US policy changes are a “sad commentary” on the worldview of the current administration, but that other countries remain dedicated to the UN climate agreement.   

R
Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

I’m half-Palestinian, half-English. I have often been mistaken for a range of ethnicities along the brown spectrum, from Italian to Indian. When people hear my name they often mistake me for a Muslim. What they never mistake me for, however, is white.

And yet, in America, that's how I'm classified. For the time being, anyway.

Michelle Taylor is 26 years old and keenly interested in the past.

The research associate at Virginia Commonwealth University is taking part in a program to reconstruct the grounds of Montpelier, the former estate of President James Madison, in Virginia. Taylor also has a personal connection to one of the slaves Madison owned, which makes her work rebuilding slave cabins especially meaningful to her.

The House of Representatives has gone along with the Senate and voted 215-205 to overturn a yet-to-take-effect regulation that would have required Internet service providers — like Comcast, Verizon and Charter — to get consumers' permission before selling their data.

President Trump is expected to sign the rollback, according to a White House statement.

t
Courtesy of Dominic Raimondo

Dominic Raimondo was one of the Lost Boys of Sudan. They were a group of young boys (and girls) displaced or orphaned during the Second Sudanese Civil War.

Raimondo now lives in Salt Lake City, but even from that long distance, the culture of his homeland is always on his mind.

That's why he visited the Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya last year, where hundreds of thousands of refugees from South Sudan have settled. 

Of all the men who have been U.S. president, just one is buried on the grounds of a state capitol. But that might be about to change.

Lawmakers in Tennessee have taken the first step to exhume the body of James K. Polk, who for a century has rested in a small, white, chest-high tomb with his wife, Sarah.

Teresa Elam remembers picnicking here with her grandfather, just downhill from the Tennessee Capitol.

"And so I did that with my children, and now we're doing it with our grandchildren," she says.

C
Brenna Daldorph

Much has been written about the Chibok girls, the 276 schoolgirls from the village of Chibok in northern Nigeria who were kidnapped by Boko Haram in April 2014. A few have been found or rescued in the past few months; most are still missing. However, there’s another group of those Chibok girls we’ve heard less about — those who managed to escape the night of the abduction.

It's time for the next voting round in our ATXplained project.

We've been collecting your questions about Austin's people, places and phenomena. Now, it's time to weigh in on which question you want us to investigate next.

Groups that help low-income families get food assistance are alarmed by a recent drop in the number of immigrants seeking help. Some families are even canceling their food stamps and other government benefits, for fear that receiving them will affect their immigration status or lead to deportation. Many of the concerns appear to be unfounded but have been fueled by the Trump administration's tough stance on immigration.

Russians are still trying to understand exactly what happened over the weekend, when thousands of people — many of them teenagers — turned out for anti-government rallies in dozens of cities across the country.

According to a recent Gallup poll, daily worry has increased among Americans since the presidential election. There was also an increase in worry after President Obama’s 2008 election, though not as much. Times of change and uncertainty often cause people to worry more.

President Obama called the Chesapeake Bay a “national treasure.” In a 2009 executive order, he helped launch a massive cleanup effort orchestrated by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Now that restoration, and others like it around the country, are in limbo because President Trump’s budget blueprint would eliminate funding for the Chesapeake and other regional cleanup programs.

Lina Shahab turns slowly and painfully in her hospital bed. Her lips are dry and cracked. Her right eye is swollen shut. There is hardly a patch on her skin that is not marked by shrapnel wounds.

“Suddenly, we heard a boom,” she says softly, describing the explosion that put her here.

“I couldn’t see anything. Glass went into my eye. A hole opened up in the floor and I fell through it. I saw everything burning. I saw my aunt and her kids dead on the other side of the room.”

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

These are divisive times in the United Kingdom. Today, the Scottish Parliament voted to seek an independence referendum that could split the country apart. Tomorrow, the U.K. triggers Brexit, the process for breaking away from the European Union.

Pages