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If you're poor and British, best not to marry a foreigner

Feb 22, 2017
R
Toby Melville

Controversial rules preventing thousands of British citizens from living in the UK with their non-European spouses have been upheld in a legal ruling today.

Under the rules, mixed-nationality married couples are forbidden to live in the UK if the British spouse receives an annual salary less than 18,600 pounds ($23,140). Other forms of income, or money earned by the foreign partner, are not considered.

The rules do not apply to couples in which the foreign partner is a citizen of a European Union country, or the foreign partner has a visa for other reasons.

News of recent anti-Semitic acts in the U.S. — like the toppling of tombstones in a Jewish cemetery in St. Louis and bomb threats against Jewish community centers — is being followed closely in Israel. So is the Israeli government's response to these incidents.

Some Israelis are questioning whether Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has played down the incidents to keep pressure off his political ally, President Trump.

Since November, Donald Trump and his surrogates have repeatedly alleged widespread voter fraud affected the outcome of the popular vote in the 2016 presidential election.

Oregon Secretary of State Dennis Richardson said it’s time for President Trump to back up what he says with facts.

When officials make unsubstantiated claims like these, Richardson said, “it causes greater distrust of the government. ... I want to make sure that the citizens of the state can trust their system.”

Disability rights activist Nick Dupree died last weekend. Tomorrow would have been his 35th birthday.

Back in 2003, he told NPR: "I want a life. I just want a life. Like anyone else. Just like your life. Or anyone else's life."

He got that life.

Steve Hinton has a pretty unusual mindset when it comes to his job.

“I try to think like a fish,” he says.

That’s a crucial part of Hinton’s job as the director of habitat restoration for the Swinomish Tribal Community and the Sauk-Suiattle Tribe. He spends a lot of his time trying to figure out how salmon will respond to obstacles in their way as they return from the Puget Sound, up the Skagit River, into little creeks and streams to spawn. One of the problems they encounter are road culverts.

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Democrat Michelle Frankard of Wisconsin voted for President Trump, and she's hoping she won't regret it.

At the Garden of Eatin', a bustling diner in picturesque Galesville, Frankard is having breakfast with her adopted father, Ken Horton. A dozen shiny electric guitars line the walls, each next to a black-and-white framed poster with the likes of Johnny Cash and Janis Joplin. The deep-seated booths host a variety of regulars and those just passing through.

Four newly discovered frog species are so tiny that they can sit comfortably on a fingernail, making them some of the smallest-known frogs in the world.

Scientists said in a video that they were "surprised to find that the miniature forms are in fact locally abundant and fairly common." The frogs likely escaped notice until now because of their tiny size and secretive habitats, hidden under damp soil or dense vegetation.

OSU-Cascades Presents Expansion Scenarios

Feb 22, 2017

Oregon State University-Cascades presented a vision for its Central Oregon campus expansion to community residents in Bend on Tuesday evening. The meeting was part of OSU-Cascades' series of community forums to gather input on the plan for the west side campus. The university now comprises three buildings on 10 acres, but it wants to grow enough for 5,000 students.

Reform groups in Mexico have been trying for years to persuade politicians to regularly disclose their assets and income, pointing to their northern neighbor as an example of a place where financial disclosure is the norm in government.

Then came President Trump, who has steadfastly refused to release his tax returns.

President Trump Could Ramp Up Deportation

Feb 22, 2017

With guest host Anthony Brooks.

New guidelines from the Trump Administration give more power to U.S. officials to deport immigrants in the country illegally . The new, tough rules are causing alarm and fear in immigrant communities.

Gene-Editing Gets A Go-Ahead

Feb 22, 2017

With guest host Anthony Brooks.

Growing support for human gene-editing. We’ll look at new breakthroughs and the ethical debate.

Wal-Mart announced Tuesday that its online sales grew at a faster pace than Amazon’s in the fourth quarter.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with CNN’s Maggie Lake (@maggielake) about what has been going so well for the nation’s largest retailer, while another iconic retailer, Macy’s, is struggling.

Since the formation of the United States, presidents have struggled with what to keep secret from the American people and what to reveal.

As co-director of the Transparency Policy Project at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Mary Graham has studied how various presidents have handled the problem over the years.

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