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The Two-Way
10:10 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Detroit Tigers Manager Jim Leyland Steps Down

He's leaving the field: Detroit Tigers manager Jim Leyland earlier this month.
Ronald Martinez Getty Images
  • NPR's Mike Pesca on Jim Leyland's decision to step down

One of Major League Baseball's most-respected and most-successful managers announced Monday that he's stepping down.

Detroit Tigers skipper Jim Leyland told reporters: "I'm going to be 69 years old [on Dec. 15]. I'm not ashamed of that. I'm proud of it. The fuel's getting a little low."

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The Two-Way
10:04 am
Mon October 21, 2013

2 Dead, 2 Wounded In Nevada School Shooting

A Sparks Middle School student cries after Monday's shooting in Sparks, Nev.
Kevin Clifford AP

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 4:05 pm

A staff member at a Nevada middle school was fatally shot by a student, who was also killed, apparently by a self-inflicted wound. Two other students, both 12-years-old — were wounded but are now in stable condition, law enforcement says.

The shooting occurred on the campus of Sparks Middle School in Sparks, Nev., a suburb of Reno on Monday before the start of classes.

A witness reports seeing the staff member who was killed trying to persuade the shooter to give up the gun.

The wounded students were being treated at a local hospital, officials said.

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Book Reviews
9:57 am
Mon October 21, 2013

If You're Looking To Read 'Lady Things,' Choose Jezebel Over Jones

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 2:19 pm

Dizzy dames don't age well. An attractive young thing doing prat falls is disarming; an older woman stumbling around for laughs spells hip replacement. Sad to say, Bridget Jones has hung on to her once-endearing daffiness, self-deprecation, and wine dependency far past their collective expiration date. That's one of the big reasons why her latest outing, called Mad About the Boy, is painful to read.

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The Two-Way
9:56 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Obama: Health Care Site Is Troubled; Affordable Care Act Is Not

"There's no sugarcoating it: The website has been too slow," President Obama said at the White House on Monday. Obama said the health care system's online problems are being addressed.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 12:05 pm

The website that's meant to allow Americans to shop and sign up for new medical plans under the Affordable Care Act isn't working as well as it should, President Obama says. But he promised that the problems will be fixed — and he said the Affordable Care Act is bringing many benefits that aren't tied to those problems.

"Nobody is madder than me that the website isn't working as it should — which means that it's going to get fixed," Obama told a crowd at an outdoor address at the White House.

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The Two-Way
9:08 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Indian Police: Crew Member From Detained U.S. Ship Tried Suicide

The MV Seaman Guard Ohio, owned by a U.S.-based security firm, was intercepted by the Indian Coast Guard off the southeastern state of Tamil Nadu.
STRDEL AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 12:22 pm

A member of a U.S.-owned ship whose crew was arrested by Indian authorities earlier this month for allegedly carrying a "huge cache" of illegal arms, has tried to commit suicide in his jail cell, police say.

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Law
9:00 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Combating Domestic Violence: One Size Doesn't Fit All

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 3:58 pm

More than 1 in 3 women in the United States will experience physical violence, rape or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetimes.

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Africa
9:00 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Burundi Genocide Survivor: Running Eases Mind

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 11:00 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

It's been 20 years today since a small East African country descended into turmoil after the death of its president, and I'm not talking about Rwanda. A year before the genocide in that county, the Hutu president of neighboring Burundi Melchoir Ndadaye was assassinated. Hutus retaliated by slaughtering thousands of their Tutsi neighbors, perhaps as many as 25,000. A decade later, the United Nations International Commission of Inquiry for Burundi called it a genocide.

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Economy
9:00 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Post Shutdown, Economy Needs Restart

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 11:00 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, one blogger wants black women to be more welcome in the world of comic books, videogames and science fiction. We'll talk about her efforts to change geek culture in just a few minutes.

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Arts & Life
9:00 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Black Girl 'Geeks' Want To See More Of Themselves In Comics

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 11:00 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, it's the 20th anniversary of the horrific genocide in Burundi that took thousands of lives. We'll hear from a survivor about how he found healing and forgiveness for his tormentors through running. That's just ahead. But first, off the top of your head, how many black female comic book characters can you name? There's Storm of course from the X-Men. She was my favorite growing up. But other than that, who else?

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Parallels
8:46 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Britain To Build New Nuclear Plant, Bucking European Trend

A worker walks inside the turbine hall of the Sizewell nuclear plant in eastern England in 2006. The U.K. government on Monday announced that French-owned EDF would build the first new British nuclear power station in 20 years.
Lefteris Pitarakis AP

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 10:13 am

Britain has approved the construction of the country's first nuclear power station in 20 years.

NPR's Philip Reeves, reporting on the announcement for our Newscast unit, said the move goes counter to a European trend to phase out nuclear power in the aftermath of Japan's Fukushima disaster in 2011.

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Parallels
8:25 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Syria's Grinding War Takes Toll On Children

Children play at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan, where more than 120,000 Syrian refugees live. Roughly two-thirds are kids, many of whom have been traumatized by the violence in their homeland.
Cassandra Nelson Mercy Corps

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 11:19 am

Alexandra Chen, a specialist in childhood trauma, is on her way from the Lebanese capital, Beirut, to the southern town of Nabatiyeh, where she's running a workshop for teachers, child psychologists and sports coaches who are dealing with the Syrian children scarred by war in their homeland.

"All of the children have experienced trauma to varying degree," explains Chen, who works for Mercy Corps and is training a dozen new hires for her aid group.

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The Two-Way
8:20 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Supreme Court Will Hear Case On Executions And Mental Disability

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 11:40 am

The standard by which a person is judged to be mentally competent enough to face execution for a crime will be reviewed by the U.S. Supreme Court, which agreed Monday to hear a Florida case revolving around that issue.

The capital punishment case, Hall, Freddie L. v. Fla., centers on the standard for judging mental disability and how state officials arrive at that judgment. The case will be argued in Washington early in 2014.

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The Two-Way
8:08 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Existing Home Sales Dip After Hitting 4-Year High

A sold sign in Chicago earlier this year.
Scott Olson Getty Images

There were 1.9 percent fewer existing homes sold in September than in August, the National Association of Realtors said Monday.

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The Two-Way
7:44 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Facebook Users Don't 'Like' This: Status Update Error Messages

Facebook

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 8:51 am

If you tried to post a status update on Facebook or "like" someone else's Monday morning, you probably got a message like this:

"There was a problem updating your status. Please try again later."

You are not alone. The Miami Herald reports:

"Facebook users are reporting trouble logging in and posting updates Monday morning.

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Elections 2013
7:22 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Washington's Initiative 522: A Tale Of Two Northwest Farms

Eric Maier farms 7,000 acres of wheat and cattle near Ritzville, Washington. He says labeling GMO foods would possibly curtail an option that would keep his farm competitive globally in the future.
Anna King Northwest News Network

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 7:27 am

The state of Washington grows about 300 types of crops -- from the lush valleys north of Seattle, to the orchards of the Columbia Basin, to the rolling fields between Spokane and Walla Walla. And if you ask any of those farmers about Washington’s Initiative 522 and you’ll get every kind of answer.

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