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Parallels
9:58 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Egypt's Crackdown On Islamists Spreads To Mosques, Charities

A physician collects medical equipment and medicines from the remains of the partially destroyed Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque compound hospital in Cairo on Aug. 15.
Khaled Desouki AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 7:09 pm

Mohammed is a teacher, and for the past 17 years, he has also worked with an Islamic charity in Cairo. But a little more than two weeks ago that charity was shut down.

Security forces raided its office, took everything and began searching for the head of the board of directors because he's connected to the Muslim Brotherhood — the Islamist group of ousted President Mohammed Morsi.

Mohammed, who asked that only his first name be used, fled.

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The Two-Way
9:40 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Former House Speaker Tom Foley Dies At 84

House Speaker Tom Foley (back, right) and Vice President Al Gore applaud during President Bill Clinton's State of the Union address on Jan. 24, 1994.
Ron Edmonds AP

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 10:20 am

Former House Speaker Tom Foley, who led the chamber from 1989 to 1995, has died, according to his family. He was 84.

The Associated Press says Foley's wife, Heather, confirmed that the Washington state Democrat died at his Washington, D.C., home.

He had reportedly been in ill health in recent months.

The AP says:

"Foley became the first speaker since the Civil War to fail to win re-election in his home district.

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Movie Reviews
9:40 am
Fri October 18, 2013

For A Free Spirit, A Grim '12 Years' In Chains

Chiwetel Ejiofor (left) plays Solomon Northup, a New York freeman kidnapped into slavery in 1841 and eventually resold to plantation owner Edwin Epps (Michael Fassbender).
Francois Duhamel Fox Searchlight Pictures

Originally published on Thu January 16, 2014 9:39 am

Just a few years before the start of the Civil War, two anti-slavery books became best-sellers in the United States. One was Uncle Tom's Cabin, the Harriet Beecher Stowe opus that went on to become the best-selling novel of the 19th century.

The other was a memoir with a mouthful of a title: Twelve Years a Slave: Narrative of Solomon Northup, a citizen of New-York, kidnapped in Washington City in 1841, and rescued in 1853 from a cotton plantation near the Red River in Louisiana.

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NPR Story
9:37 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Former Speaker Of The House Tom Foley Dead At 84

Former Speaker of the House Tom Foley died Friday at the age of 84.
U.S. House of Representatives

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 1:27 pm

Former Speaker of the U.S. House Tom Foley died Friday morning at his current home in Washington, DC. He was 84. 

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Business
9:23 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Google Shares Top $1,000 For First Time

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news start with Google at an all-time high.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: The Internet giant shares soared to new heights this morning, topping $1,000 a share. Google reported better than expected third-quarter sales and profits, reporting a profit of nearly $3 billion during the third quarter, up nearly 40 percent from a year earlier.

It is now the fourth company trading on a major exchange to have a stock price of $1,000 or more. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Salt
9:18 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Scratch 'N' Sniff Your Way To Wine Expertise ... Or At Least More Fun

Scratch 'n' sniff technology hasn't changed much in the last few decades. So the peach cartoon still smells artificial and not what you'll find in a glass of sauvignon blanc.
Text copyright 2013 by Richard Betts. Illustrations copyright (c) 2013 by Wendy MacNaughton. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 5:58 pm

Knock wine off its pedestal. That's the goal of wine expert Richard Betts. And he has come up with a brilliant way to do it: a scratch n' sniff guide to the aromas and flavors of the wine world.

With beautiful illustrations from Wendy MacNaughton, the 10-page board book looks like it belongs with your kid's toys instead of next to The Joy of Cooking.

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Interviews
9:03 am
Fri October 18, 2013

'Let's Explore': David Sedaris On His Public Private Life

This American Life and in The New Yorker, and have now filled seven essay collections -- most recently, Let's Explore Diabetes With Owls." href="/post/lets-explore-david-sedaris-his-public-private-life-0" class="noexit lightbox">
David Sedaris' stories have appeared on This American Life and in The New Yorker, and have now filled seven essay collections -- most recently, Let's Explore Diabetes With Owls.
Hugh Hamrick Little, Brown and Co.

This interview was originally broadcast on April 24, 2013.

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Shots - Health News
9:01 am
Fri October 18, 2013

To Prevent HIV Infection, Couples Try Testing Together

David Lozano (left) and Kevin Kreinbring stand in front of a painting created by Lozano. The couple says they get tested for HIV together every six months.
Courtesy of David Lozano

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 9:56 am

Getting tested for HIV in the U.S. is almost always private, sometimes even secretive. Ditto for disclosing the results.

But some say the approach is outmoded at a time when many at risk for HIV — gay men — are in committed relationships.

Research shows as many as two-thirds of new HIV infections among gay men these days are within committed couples. That's very different from the days when promiscuity fueled the epidemic.

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Nuclear Energy
8:58 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Let-Go Hanford Whistleblower Readies For Upcoming Court Battles

Walter Tamosaitis has worked in the chemical and nuclear industry for 44 years. He was just laid-off earlier this month.
Rajah Bose

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 7:19 am

In early November, a federal appeals court will consider the case of a well-known Hanford whistleblower.

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Movie Reviews
8:50 am
Fri October 18, 2013

At Home At Sea: Robert Redford, At His Best Alone

Robert Redford stars in All Is Lost as a solitary man struggling to make his yacht seaworthy again after it collides with a rogue shipping container adrift in the Indian Ocean.
Richard Foreman Roadside Attractions/Lionsgate

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 12:38 pm

As I watched Robert Redford acting all by himself in the superlative survival-at-sea movie All Is Lost, I suddenly realized why the setup feels so perfect: Redford is most in his element when he's alone.

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Politics
8:43 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Shutdown Nightmare's Over, Is Capitol Hill Still Dreaming?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later this hour, our Friday features, the Barbershop guys will be here and we'll meet a mother who says she and her husband did everything their conservative church asked of them, including campaign against same-sex marriage, until they realized their own son is gay. And she'll tell us how she's now trying to reconcile her love of her church with her love of her son. That's Faith Matters and that's coming up.

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Barbershop
8:43 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Play Ball: Do Fans Have Amnesia Over Steroid Scandal?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barbershop where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds. Sitting in the chairs for a shape-up this week are writer Jimi Izrael with us from Cleveland. But in Washington, D.C., I have Dave Zirin, sports editor at the progressive magazine The Nation, Paul Butler, law professor at Georgetown University, and what do you know, NPR editor Ammad Omar sticking around. Take it away, Jimi.

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BackTalk
8:43 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Listeners Bean Parents After Dodgeball Conversation

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now it's time for Backtalk. That's where we hear from you. Editor Ammad Omar is back with us once again. What's going on today, Ammad?

AMMAD OMAR, BYLINE: Hey, Michel, so it's been a week of heated debate here in Washington. As you know, we've had the shutdown, the debt ceiling debate. But if you look at our listener inbox, nothing got the passions more heated than our conversation about dodgeball.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "DODGEBALL: A TRUE UNDERDOG STORY")

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The Two-Way
8:23 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Mexico's 'Prison Angel,' Sister Antonia Brenner, Dies At 86

Sister Antonia Brenner touches the statue of San Pablo Encandenado (St. Paul chained) outside the chapel at La Mesa State Penitentiary in Tijuana, Mexico, in 2005.
Lenny Ignelzi AP

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 12:11 pm

Sister Antonia Brenner, a twice-divorced mother of seven turned "prison angel" who spent the last three decades of her life ministering to inmates at a Mexican penitentiary, has died. She was 86.

Brenner moved into a 10-by-10-foot cell at Tijuana's notorious La Mesa penitentiary, where she came to be known as "La Mama" by the prisoners, whom she called her children. She spent her time "mending broken lives, easing tensions and dispensing everything from toothbrushes to bail money," according to the Los Angeles Times.

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It's All Politics
8:15 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Mississippi Sen. Thad Cochran Gets A Tea Party Challenge

State Sen. Chris McDaniel waves at supporters after announcing his candidacy for the U.S. Senate during a rally at the Jones County Courthouse in Ellisville, Miss., on Thursday.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 12:24 pm

It's official: Mississippi Sen. Thad Cochran is the latest GOP incumbent to get a primary challenge from the right.

State Sen. Chris McDaniel announced Thursday he'll try to unseat the six-term veteran in 2014, the day after Cochran voted for the compromise to end the government shutdown and avert a debt default.

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