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5:03 am
Sat February 22, 2014

Olympics Serve Up A Surfeit Of Strife On Ice

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 10:06 am

While the 2014 Winter Olympics are coming to an end, there are still opportunities to take home the gold. Reporter Tom Goldman joins NPR's Scott Simon to talk about ice hockey and the speed skating.

Summer Reading: Kids
5:03 am
Sat February 22, 2014

The Last Undefeated College Basketball Team Plays For Title

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 10:06 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Wichita State's basketball team is the last undefeated men's team in America - 28 wins. That got them on one of the regional covers of Sports Illustrated, and that adds a little pressure. If the Shockers win tonight, they'll clinch the Missouri Valley Conference title. From member station KMUW in Wichita, Carla Eckels reports on the team's winning season.

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Code Switch
2:54 am
Sat February 22, 2014

Iconoclastic Musician Takes Measure Of His Life: 'I Became A Fighter'

Fred Ho practices his baritone saxophone in a dressing room before a performance.
Joseph Yoon Courtesy of Fred Ho

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 12:43 pm

When I first walked through the door of Fred Ho's apartment in the Greenpoint area of Brooklyn, I asked, "How are you?" And he said, "Not good. I'm dying."

Ho has always been matter-of-fact and in-your-face. He painted himself green and posed naked for the cover his album, Celestial Green Monster. In the photo, he has a baritone saxophone placed strategically between his legs. He looks strong — like the Hulk.

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Environment
2:50 am
Sat February 22, 2014

Amid California Drought, Migrating Birds Enjoy Pop-Up Cuisine

Rice farmer Douglas Thomas watches snow geese take flight over his rice fields in California's Central Valley.
Lauren Sommer KQED

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 6:37 am

Millions of birds migrate through California this time of year, but the waterways and wetlands they rely on for food and rest are largely dry due to the ongoing drought. So farmers are keeping their fields flooded to make temporary wetlands, providing a place for migrating birds to rest and eat.

Rice farmer Douglas Thomas is one of these farmers. On a recent morning some 3,000 snow geese float in his rice fields in California's Central Valley. He's watching a young bald eagle awkwardly dive at the flock.

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The Two-Way
2:13 am
Sat February 22, 2014

Ukrainian President Voted Out; Opposition Leader Freed

Anti-government protesters stand guard in front of Ukraine's parliament in Kiev on Saturday.
Marko Drobnjakovic AP

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 10:35 pm

This post was updated at 3:10 p.m. ET.

Ukraine's parliament has voted to push President Viktor Yanukovych out of office hours after he fled the capital and denounced events in the country as "a coup d'etat" in a television interview.

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It's All Politics
6:59 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

FCC Won't Ask Journalists To Explain Themselves After All

Critics told Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler his agency's proposed news media study would threaten press freedom.
Susan Walsh AP

It may not be in full retreat, but the Federal Communications Commission certainly seemed to be in a major strategic withdrawal from a plan that has caused a political firestorm: a study that would have asked journalists and media owners how they decide what is and isn't news.

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Code Switch
4:53 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

Asian-American Contestant, 'Villain' Of 'Jeopardy,' Set To Return

Game show contestant Arthur Chu with host Alex Trebek on the set of Jeopardy!
Courtesy of Jeopardy Productions, Inc.

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 11:55 am

If there are any unwritten rules to playing Jeopardy! Arthur Chu may have broken them all.

During his four-day winning streak in late January, he sometimes interrupted host Alex Trebek and cut in before the host could finish a sentence. He often jumped to the hardest clues on the board first and furiously tapped his buzzer whenever he knew the answer.

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Planet Money
3:47 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

For More Organ Donors, Just Head To The Local DMV

SOEREN STACHE DPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 4:53 pm

When Kim Zaza became the volunteer coordinator for a non profit called Gift of Life Michigan only 11 percent of Michigan's population was on the organ donor registry. Her job was to increase that number.

Zasa is energetic and really likes people. So she was naturally optimistic about her ability to sell the idea of donating organs to the people of Michigan just by talking to them. "We just went out and signed up for every art fair, church event, every little podunk little thing we could possibly think of just to try to get our information out there," she says.

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The Edge
3:38 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

Alcoholics Learn To Make Their Own Beer In Canadian Program

Tyler BigChild, a board member of Vancouver's Drug Users Resource Center, is also part of its Brew Co-Op. The group teaches alcoholics how to make beer and wine, in the hopes that they'll stop risky behavior such as drinking rubbing alcohol.
Portland Hotel Society

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 4:59 pm

Call it a new twist on the old "teach a man to fish" adage. A group in Vancouver, British Columbia, is teaching inveterate alcoholics to brew their own beer and make their own wine, in an attempt to keep them from drinking unsafe liquids to get an alcoholic high.

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The Edge
2:06 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

Same Banned Substance Fells German Biathlete, Italian Bobsledder

Germany's Evi Sachenbacher-Stehle has left her country's Olympic contingent — and Sochi — after testing positive for a banned stimulant. She's seen here in the biathlon earlier this week; Sachenbacher-Stehle finished fourth.
Odd Andersen AFP/Getty Images

Germany's Sochi 2014 contingent is reeling from the news that Evi Sachenbacher-Stehle, a former Olympic medalist in cross-country skiing who took fourth place in the biathlon Monday, has tested positive for banned substances at the Sochi Winter Olympics. An Italian athlete also tested positive, officials said Friday.

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The Salt
1:36 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

How Tracing The Oil In Your Pop-Tarts May Help Save Rain Forests

Kellogg, maker of Pop-Tarts, announced Feb. 14 that it will buy palm oil — an ingredient in Pop-Tarts — only from companies that don't destroy rain forests where palm trees are grown.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 5:57 pm

If you think a small shareholder can't get the attention of the multibillion-dollar palm oil industry, think again.

Lucia von Reusner lives half a world away from the palm oil plantations in Southeast Asia that have become notorious for environmental, labor and human rights abuses.

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Shots - Health News
1:31 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

Overdiagnosis Could Be Behind Jump In Thyroid Cancer Cases

An ultrasound test is used to look for nodules on the thyroid gland at the front of the throat.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 1:05 pm

You go in for a checkup. The doctor feels your throat. Hmm, she says, there's a lump in your thyroid gland. We better check that out.

And that might be the start of a painful, costly and unnecessary treatment for thyroid cancer, a study says.

The number of people diagnosed with thyroid cancer has tripled since 1975, but many of those cases are probably due to small, slow-growing tumors that would never cause problems, the researchers say.

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NPR Story
1:10 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

Dick Button Judges Sochi Skating

Adelina Sotnikova of Russia, centre, Yuna Kim of South Korea, left, and Carolina Kostner of Italy stand on the podium during the flower ceremony for the women's free skate figure skating final at the Iceberg Skating Palace during the 2014 Winter Olympics, Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014, in Sochi, Russia. Sotnikova placed first, followed by Kim and Kostner. (Ivan Sekretarev/AP)

Sadly, it seems the Olympics wouldn’t be the same without a figure skating judging controversy.

This time it’s yesterday’s surprise gold medal by the four-time Russian national champion Adelina Sotnikova, who as skating great Brian Boitano said, literally “jumped her way” to the top of the podium, beating the artistically better skater, South Korea’s Kim Yu-na, who won the gold four years ago.

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NPR Story
1:10 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

Navigating Obstacles For Wheelchair Users

Disabled persons often face limited mobility in the winter months when people neglect to shovel their sidewalks. (Knight725/Flickr)

When snow piles up, property owners don’t always shovel their sidewalks, and that can make it nearly impossible for some people to get around safely, especially those who use a wheelchair or have problem vision.

Kelly Buckland knows what it’s like to try to make it along winter sidewalks and roads. He broke his neck in a diving accident when he was 16 in Idaho, and has been using a wheelchair ever since. He also knows what it’s like to advocate and lobby to improve conditions for people with disabilities.

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NPR Story
1:10 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

Business Wire Stops First Access To High-Speed Traders

Business Wire, a subsidiary of Berkshire Hathaway, has decided to stop giving high-speed trading firms direct access to its service.

The firm gave traders a split-second lead on business press releases and, while the practice is legal, critics say it gave high frequency traders an edge over other investors.

Winnie O’Kelley of Bloomberg News joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to explain.

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