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NPR Story
1:09 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Organization Seeks To Preserve Slave Dwellings

Joe McGill, of the Slave Dwelling Project, at Stagville Plantation in North Carolina. (Stagville Plantation/Facebook)

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 1:11 pm

There are still plenty of physical reminders of slavery today. Among them: hundreds of former slave cabins across the country.

A group called the Slave Dwelling Project sets out to identify these mostly small, dilapidated structures and bring attention to their preservation by inviting people to sleep in them.

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NPR Story
1:08 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Adding Up The Cost Of Low Literacy Among Adults

Students participate in a health literacy class at Mary's Center, role-playing a visit to the doctor. (Kavitha Cardoza/WAMU)

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 1:11 pm

For the past few days, NPR has been taking a look at the challenges facing the 30 million American adults who lack basic literacy skills.

In the final part of our series on adult education, Kavitha Cardoza of member station WAMU examines the economic and social impacts — not just on individuals, but on society as a whole.

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It's All Politics
12:36 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Employment Non-Discrimination Act Passes First Senate Hurdle

Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., at a 2011 news conference on Capitol Hill. On Monday, Heller announced his support for the Employment Non-Discrimination Act.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 3:59 pm

Update at 6:47 p.m. Senate Passes Bill:

With a vote of 61-30, the Senate voted to move forward on legislation that would prohibit workplace discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity.

The vote Monday opens the floor to debate on the bill and the Senate is expected to schedule a full vote by week's end.

Our original post continues:

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The Two-Way
12:29 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Not An Earthquake: Quarry Blast Sparks Tremors In Chicago Suburbs

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 1:20 pm

Around lunchtime today, residents in Chicago's western suburbs felt the earth shake. As WLS-TV reported, they assumed it was an earthquake and the United States Geological Survey reported it as a 3.7 magnitude quake.

While rare, earthquakes do happen in this part of the country. This would have been a significant one for the area.

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Book Reviews
12:01 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

Female Friendship Puts 'New' Angle On Italian Classism And Machismo

The Story Of A New Name Book Cover

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 6:46 am

Some writers you read and move on, but every now and then you read one whose work knocks you back against the wall. This happened to me with the great Italian novelist Elena Ferrante.

I first encountered her through her scalding 2002 novel, The Days Of Abandonment, whose narrator, Olga, may be the scariest jilted wife since Medea. What makes Olga scary is not what she does, but what she thinks and feels, and her ferocious precision in describing everything from lousy sexual encounters to her not-altogether-maternal feelings about her children.

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Author Interviews
12:01 pm
Mon November 4, 2013

From Sulking To Sanctions, A Street-Level View Of Life In Iran

Iranian demonstrators march in Tehran in 2011, during a protest asking the government to intensify its enforcement of the Islamic dress code.
Atta Kenare AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 12:15 pm

Monday is the 34th anniversary of the 1979 storming of the American Embassy in Tehran, when Iranian militants took 66 hostages and held them for more than a year. U.S.-Iranian relations have been contentious ever since, but recent events have stirred hopes for progress.

Iranian voters overwhelmingly chose a more moderate president in June, and American and Iranian mediators are meeting to try to resolve disputes about Iran's nuclear program.

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Parallels
11:59 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Racism Mars Russian Sports In Advance Of World Competitions

Spartak Moscow soccer fans burn flares and wave a flag with a swastika (lower right) during a game with Shinnik Yaroslavl in Yaroslavl, Russia, on Oct. 30. It's one of several recent violent or racist incidents at sporting events in a country that's hosting the 2014 Winter Olympics and the 2018 World Cup.
STR AP

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 12:28 am

Racism and right-wing violence are threatening Russia's reputation in international sports as the country prepares to host the Winter Olympics in February and the World Cup soccer finals in 2018.

The latest incident was a riot at a soccer match last week in Yaroslavl, between the local Shinnik (Tiremakers) team and Spartak, a squad from Moscow.

Fights broke out along the barrier between the opposing fans, then Spartak fans ripped up stadium seats and threw them at riot police who tried to drive the fans back with blasts from a water cannon.

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Code Switch
11:54 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Author Catherine Chung: 'I Want To Embrace The Things That I Am'

Catherine Chung's first novel, Forgotten Country, was an honorable mention for a PEN/Hemingway Award.
Ayano Hisa Courtesy of Catherine Chung

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 1:50 pm

Catherine Chung went from mathematics to writing, though she says words were always her first love. She was named one of Granta's New Voices in 2010, and her first novel, Forgotten Country, received honorable mention for a PEN/Hemingway Award last year.

In Forgotten Country, Chung writes of a family with a curse that stretches back generations — from their time in Korea to their life in America. Since the Japanese occupation of Korea, each generation of the family has lost a daughter.

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Shots - Health News
11:45 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Johnson & Johnson To Pay $2.2 Billion In Marketing Settlement

The schizophrenia drug Risperdal was at the heart of government investigations into improper marketing that stretched back more than a decade.
JB Reed Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 1:00 pm

Like professional baseball, the drug industry may need to slap asterisks next to some of its standout sales accomplishments.

Johnson & Johnson became the latest drugmaker to reach a costly agreement with the federal government over charges of improper marketing. The widely anticipated settlement, unveiled Monday, covers Natrecor, a drug for congestive heart failure, and antipsychotics Risperdal and Invega.

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The Salt
11:41 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Sandwich Monday: Pumpkin Spice Eggo Waffles

I tried to spell out "HELP" with syrup in the little squares, but there aren't enough pixels.
NPR

If you sell food, this is the time of year you have no choice but to sell something with pumpkin spice flavoring. This has been especially hard on Taco Bell, which — nationwide — has sold only one Pumpkin Spice Dorito Loco Taco. Today, we try the Pumpkin Spice Eggo Waffle, washed down with the classic Starbucks Pumpkin Spice Latte.

Eva: In the Fall, never ask a woman if she's pregnant. She might just have Pumpkin Spice Latte Belly.

Peter: I think these are a great fall treat, redolent as they are of death and decay.

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The Two-Way
11:32 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Johns Hopkins Halts, Reviews Black Lung Program

Johns Hopkins Medicine says it will suspend and review its black lung program, following joint investigative reports last week from the Center for Public Integrity and ABC News that found the program "helped coal companies thwart efforts by ailing mine workers to receive disability benefi

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The Two-Way
10:47 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Child Care Costs, Already High, Outpace Family Income Gains

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 10:55 am

In 2012, the cost of child care in the U.S. grew up to eight times faster than family income, according to a new study of the average fees paid to child care centers and family child care homes.

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Business
9:40 am
Mon November 4, 2013

SAC Capital Agrees To Plead Guilty To Insider Trading

Originally published on Mon November 4, 2013 2:28 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a guilty plea.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: SAC Capital Advisors is expected to plead guilty to securities fraud today. The hedge fund company has agreed to pay $1.8 billion to settle charges of insider trader. It's said to be the biggest fine ever in a case like this. The settlement will be announced at a news conference later today in New York City. And that's where we've reached NPR's Jim Zarroli. And Jim, explain for us, if you can, what SAC has actually agreed to here.

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Parallels
9:39 am
Mon November 4, 2013

China Sets Ambitious Agenda In 'Asian Space Race'

Nie Haisheng, Zhang Xiaoguang and Wang Yaping aboard the Tiangong-1 space module in June. China is leading what some see as a space race among Asian countries: It has worked on a lunar rover, a space station and an unmanned mission to Mars.
Wang Yongzhuo Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Tue November 5, 2013 5:57 pm

India's launch Tuesday of a satellite bound for Mars is the latest milestone in a space race among Asian nations. China, though, is still seen as the leader. A decade ago, China became the third nation to put up a manned spacecraft; it has worked on a lunar rover, a space station as well as its own unmanned mission to Mars.

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'Tis The Season (Already)
9:36 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Northwest Christmas Tree Starts Long Journey To Congress' Front Lawn

The 2013 Capitol Tree, from the Colville National Forest in northeast Washington, is prepared for loading onto a truck.
Jessica Robinson Northwest News Network

Originally published on Fri November 1, 2013 5:35 pm

The Christmas tree destined for the nation's capital is set to begin a cross-country roadtrip. But getting an 80-foot tree out of a national forest isn't quite like going to a U-cut.

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