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Portland Public Schools is shutting off all the drinking water across more than 70 school buildings, following the discovery of elevated lead levels at two schools.

Portland announced plans to shut off the water to drinking fountains Friday, and keep it off through the end of the school year, June 9. Oregon’s largest district will rely on bottled water for students and staff to drink, and for meal preparation in school kitchens.

Peter and Pam Hayes's claim about herbicide exposure in the forest of the Oregon Coast Range begins the same way as most from the news in recent years.

On May 17, they and two others were out tending their property. They heard a helicopter in the distance and thought little of it. Then, they say, they began to smell and taste chemicals.

“The helicopter was not over me. It was not droplets. It was just a super strong, strong taste," Pam said.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife drew hard questions from conservationists Thursday night in Portland as it sought comment on its latest budget proposal.

In a stuffy hotel conference room over the hum of a projector, ODFW Director Curt Melcher explained the agency's current budget situation, how a new task force had been established to seek new revenue sources and that no major changes were planned for any of the agency's programs.

This week on State of Wonder, the city's plans to enforce pot policy puts many marijuana-related events on hold, the comedian Curtis Cook talks about what it takes to be brave and writer Andi Zeisler discusses the commodification of feminism and more.

Portland Just Says No To Many Marijuana-Related Events

Oregon education leaders have published an in-depth analysis of why some students frequently miss school.

Twenty percent of Oregon students are considered “chronically absent,” because they miss at least one day of school every two weeks. Researchers explored why it’s a bigger problem for certain student groups — such as Native American children, other students of color and kids with disabilities.

Copyright 2016 Oregon Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit Oregon Public Broadcasting.

Curtis Cook Throws Curveballs

May 27, 2016

Comedian Curtis Cook excels at a kind of curveball - unassuming riffs that quietly steer you right where he wants you.

Cook has been on fire lately, telling tales on his own post-feminist angst, calling out racial hang-ups and generally skewering progressive Portland. He’s co-hosting several showcases around town, including Earthquake Hurricane and the new Do What You Love show at We Work. And he’s writing columns for Willamette Week.

In hanging around with Curtis Cook, we stumbled across a pretty interesting event he’s involved with.

In recent years, a gap has opened between Oregon’s new economy and the arts. A lot of these younger corporate citizens are leveraged in such a way that they don’t have much extra cash to give directly. Others are based out of state. But sometimes, all it takes is a good idea to make the connection.

A federal jury in Seattle has awarded a former BNSF Railway worker, and whistleblower, more than $1.6 million.

In 2010, Curtis Rookaird alerted federal officials that his employer had told him to forego an important brake test on a train carrying oil and hazardous materials. He was later fired.

University of Minnesota wrestling coach J Robinson and several of his student-athletes are under investigation after allegations emerged around the possession and possible sales of a prescription drug.

News reports have cited sources that say multiple wrestlers were using Xanax, a prescription anti-anxiety drug, and four of them were selling it.

The reports say Robinson called out the wrestlers and demanded they bring him the pills so he could dispose of them. He then allegedly had the student-athletes take urine tests and write essays about what they'd done.

The EVE auction house in Paris is getting ready to sell off a collection of historical and highly controversial objects.

The collection notably includes a ceremonial war shield, masks, a shrunken head, a warrior jacket adorned with human scalps, ancient jewelry, and ceremonial stones. Most of the collection can be traced back to Native American Indian tribes including the Acoma Pueblo and the Hopi.

US laws prohibit the sale of Native American ceremonial items, but those don’t apply in France.

Former Portland Police Chief Mike Reese said Friday he plans to run for Multnomah County Sheriff.

“I’m looking forward for election as sheriff at the next opportunity," Reese said.

Current Sheriff Dan Staton is retiring in August, following allegations of corruption and retaliation against staff.

Reese declined to comment on Staton. But Portland's former top cop will take over as interim sheriff when Staton leaves in this summer.

Staton said in a note to staff Friday that Reese would join the office as undersheriff in mid-June.

State regulators talked about new limits on art glass emissions today. But the hearing turned emotional as the wife of the owner of Oregon’s art glass leader made a surprise appearance.

Nobody knew Lani McGregor was coming to Friday's meeting of the DEQ fiscal advisory committee, which convened to look at new limits for Oregon’s celebrated art glass industry. She's the director of Bullseye Projects, the company's fine art arm, and the wife of founder Dan Schwoerer.

Teachers and kids at Harrison Elementary in Cottage Grove spend the entire school year fundraising for just a four-day trip in May. But those four days at Camp Tadmor in Lebanon — spent canoeing, fishing, studying wildlife and environments, and doing team-building activities — leave an impression on kids that can last a lifetime, say leaders and teachers who have come back year after year for decades.

Think Out Loud went to Camp Tadmor on May 26 to find out what learning outdoors does for kids and why adults have such affection for outdoor school.

Teachers and kids at Harrison Elementary in Cottage Grove spend the entire school year fundraising for just a four-day trip in May. But those four days at Camp Tadmor in Lebanon — spent canoeing, fishing, studying wildlife and environments, and doing team-building activities — leave an impression on kids that can last a lifetime, say leaders and teachers who have come back year after year for decades.

Think Out Loud went to Camp Tadmor on May 26 to find out what learning outdoors does for kids and why adults have such affection for outdoor school.

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