NPR News

The State Of The Cancer Nation

Apr 17, 2015

While a cure for cancer remains elusive, we already know how to keep many cases of the disease from developing in the first place.

People can reduce cancer risks by keeping a healthful weight and avoiding cigarettes.

But smoking, obesity and other major cancer risk factors remain common, and they still vary widely across the country.

An audacious proposal to revive the Columbia River’s historic Celilo Falls drew heavy flak when it was aired at the Oregon Legislature Thursday.

Washington State Auditor Troy Kelley is defending himself in the face of a 10-count federal indictment and shows no sign of resigning. 

Iraqi forces claim to have killed Izzat Ibrahim al-Douri, who served in Saddam Hussein's leadership circle and is believed to have been instrumental in the sudden rise of the self-declared Islamic State.

But an official from Saddam's Baath Party has denied the report.

Douri, 72, is the "king of clubs" in the deck of playing cards U.S. troops used to identify key figures in Saddam's regime following the 2003 invasion that toppled the Baathist regime.

The language of addiction is always evolving. Maybe we need an addictionary.

For example, when the word "alcohol" was written or spoken in early 19th-century America. it was often used in the chemical and medical sense. This is from an article about drawing out the essence of stramonium, or jimson weed: "The virtues of stramonium," the New England Journal of Medicine reported in January of 1818, "appear to be seated in an extractive principle, which dissolves in water and alcohol."

Vacuum cleaners get them. Movies get them. Now hospitals are being given star ratings to help patients decide which ones to use.

On Thursday the federal government awarded its first star ratings to hospitals based on the opinions of patients. Some of the nation's most lofty hospitals—the ones featured in best hospital lists—received mediocre ratings, while the maximum number of stars often went to small, regional hospitals and others that specialize in lucrative surgeries.

A string of insults aimed at a woman who works at a towing company were recorded by a surveillance camera. Now they've come back to sting sports reporter Britt McHenry. After the video emerged of McHenry, 28, dishing out profane verbal abuse, ESPN announced she'll be punished.

"Britt McHenry has been suspended for one week effectively immediately," the media company said.

Pope Francis, who plans to visit the United States in September, might tack onto his itinerary a side trip to Cuba, the Vatican says, but it cautions the talks with Havana are at an early stage.

The Catholic Herald quotes Vatican spokesman Federico Lombardi as saying Francis is "considering the idea of a Cuba leg."

The Herald notes:

How Did Abraham Maslow Change Psychology?

Apr 17, 2015

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Maslow's Human Needs

Brandeis Psychology professor Margie Lachman works in the same office where Abraham Maslow developed his hierarchy of needs. She describes his lasting influence on psychology.

About Margie Lachman

Why Do We Need Sleep?

Apr 17, 2015

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Maslow's Human Needs

About Russell Foster's TED Talk

What do we know about one of our most basic needs: sleep? Not a lot, says circadian neuroscientist Russell Foster. We know we need to do it to stay alive, but much about it remains a mystery.

About Russell Foster

What Does It Take To Feel Secure?

Apr 17, 2015

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Maslow's Human Needs

About Bruce Schneier's TED Talk

Computer security expert Bruce Schneier says there's a big difference between feeling secure and actually being secure. He explains why we worry about unlikely dangers while ignoring more probable risks.

About Bruce Schneier

How Does War Teach Soldiers About Love?

Apr 17, 2015

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Maslow's Human Needs

About Sebastian Junger's TED Talk

Journalist Sebastian Junger was embedded with soldiers in the Korengal Valley during the war in Afghanistan. One of the reasons some veterans miss war, he says, is because it fulfills a deep human need to belong to a trusted group.

About Sebastian Junger

What Defines A Person's Sense Of Self?

Apr 17, 2015

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Maslow's Human Needs

About Caroline Casey's TED Talk

Caroline Casey was 17 years old when she first learned she was visually impaired. Embracing her disability helped nourish her need for self-esteem.

About Caroline Casey

What Makes A Life Worth Living?

Apr 17, 2015

Part 6 of the TED Radio Hour episode Maslow's Human Needs

About Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi's TED Talk

Psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi says we can achieve one of the most elusive needs — self-actualization — by finding a state of "flow" in our work or our hobbies.

About Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

Updated at 10:15 a.m. ET

If there's one piece of hardware that can be found on nearly every trader's desk, regardless of time zone, it's the Bloomberg data terminal.

So when the terminals experienced a global outage lasting hours, it sent chaos through markets where the "screens" are relied upon to analyze and interpret financial data — and to exchange market gossip with traders around the world.

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