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President Trump is about to make his debut at an institution he has often berated. For the first time, he will attend the annual United Nations General Assembly in New York, which brings together leaders of the 193 member nations for a week of meetings and speeches.

As president-elect, he called the U.N. "just a club for people to get together, talk and have a good time."

But it's a "new day" at the U.N., said U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Leprosy Is Not Quite Yet A Disease Of The Past

Sep 16, 2017

Leprosy is an ancient disease, a biblical curse and, even in the 21st century, a cultural shame so severe that in some countries, patients are sent to live in isolated colonies or tossed out of their own homes.

"I met a woman whose husband and children forced her to live in the cow shed," says Gareth Shrubshole, programs and advocacy officer at the Leprosy Mission. "Her boys refused to share a meal with their own mother." That was in India.

The power outages that followed hurricanes Harvey and Irma are unfortunately a common reality with powerful storms, just as is the fact that the affected people need to eat.

Hurricane diets can consist of a lot of processed, prepackaged food, but with a bit of imagination or preparation, hot meals are possible.

After Hurricane Irma hit Florida, Tara Gatscher and her family returned to their house in Tampa Bay to find that while the house didn't have any terrible damage, they didn't have power.

Updated at 4 a.m. ET Sunday

Police in the U.K. have now arrested two men in connection with the explosion on a train Friday that left dozens injured.

London's Metropolitan Police announced on Sunday morning that they arrested a 21-year-old man in the west London area of Hounslow late on Saturday night.

Earlier on Saturday police made what they said was a "significant arrest" of an 18-year-old man in relation to the investigation.

Ask Luis Garza how the La Raza exhibition came to be at The Autry Museum of the American West, and he raises his palms, eyes heavenward:

"Karma," he says. "Fate. Serendipity. The gods have chosen to align us at this moment in time."

Buckle up! We'll be visiting many U.S. states and territories in our weekly education news roundup.

Florida schools reopening after Irma

Schools all over Florida remained closed this week in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma. Most have targeted this Monday to reopen. The closures affected several hundred thousand students in some of the largest districts in the country, from Miami to Jacksonville.

DeVos' "Rethink School" tour

When he came to the United States 12 years ago, Edgar Velazquez hardly spoke a word of English. Most days of his first year, the 14-year-old Mexican immigrant went to the library after school to read the dictionary, determined to learn 250 words — the minimum for basic conversation.

At home, Velazquez often did his homework in the bathroom. It was the quietest spot in his family's 500 square-foot studio in the Tenderloin, a San Francisco neighborhood with "needles on the ground and a lot of homeless on the streets," he recalls.

Oregon lawmakers are returning to the Capitol Monday for a three-day flurry of meetings. It’s the first round of “Legislative Days” since the 2017 session adjourned in July.

Thousands of Northwest residents will be getting less electricity from burning coal. That’s because of a new agreement to fast-track the closure of a coal-fired power plant in Montana.

The announcement came Friday as part of a rate settlement from Puget Sound Energy. The investor-owned utility has agreed to be financially ready to close its coal plant in Montana nearly two decades ahead of what they’d originally planned.

To do this, PSE will increase customer’s electric rates by about 1 percent. That increase will be offset by a 4 percent cut in natural gas rates.

For the first time in a decade, there’s an open seat on Portland’s City Council. Longtime Portland City Commissioner Dan Saltzman announced this week that he won’t seek re-election next year.

Saltzman, 63, has served on the City Council since 1998.

"By presenting an open seat, I'm hoping that other people who've always thought they have something to contribute might indeed step up," he said. 

Here’s a shortlist of local politicians who could be contenders for the seat, and what they said when asked if they intend to run.

Jo Ann Hardesty

Oregon lawmakers are returning to the Capitol for a three-day flurry of meetings. It’s the first round of Legislative Days since the 2017 session adjourned July 7.

One high-profile hearing will be Monday’s meeting of the Senate Interim Committee on General Government and Accountability.

A federal judge in Chicago has ruled that the Trump administration may not withhold public-safety grants to so-called sanctuary cities. The decision issued Friday is a setback to the administration's efforts to force local jurisdictions to help federal authorities crack down on illegal immigration.

Paid parking spots along Congress Avenue were transformed into pop-up parks Friday during a daylong event known as Park(ing) Day. First held in 2005, the worldwide event invites designers, architects and artists to do more with less, by constructing installations to promote the need for parks in developed urban cores.

Resources For Veterans And Survivors

Sep 15, 2017

Oregon is home to more than 320,000 veterans across the state — four generations strong across five major wars. Vietnam veterans make up the largest segment of our community, but did not receive a welcome home in their own time. Today, we proudly honor our Vietnam veterans and all Oregon veterans. Veteran service officers in every county stand ready to be the advocate in their corner. Reach out today and connect Oregon’s veterans and their families to the benefits they have earned.

For war survivors and other non-service members needing help, here are available resources:

Farewell, Cassini

Sep 15, 2017
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NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Applause for the demise of a ship. Not your usual reaction, but this was not your usual voyage.

It was a 20-year voyage from Earth to Saturn, and it finally ended early this morning — Earth time — when the Cassini spaceship burned up in the atmosphere of the giant planet.

“The signal from the spacecraft is gone,” announced a NASA flight controller from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. “I’m going to call this the end of [the] mission.”

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Wikimedia/<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/" target="_blank">CC BY-SA 4.0</a>

Chelsea Manning is in the news again.

The 29-year-old former military whistleblower is at the center of a dustup at Harvard University's prestigious John F. Kennedy School of Government.

The school invited her to speak to students and faculty and, as is often the case with such guests, dignified her with the title of visiting fellow. That outraged many military and intelligence veterans.

So, early Friday morning, the Kennedy School backed down.

Copyright 2017 Oregon Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit Oregon Public Broadcasting.

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REUTERS/KCNA&nbsp;

It’s no secret that in recent years, North Korea has stepped up efforts to expand its nuclear weapons stockpile.

More quietly, though, it’s been stashing another commodity: bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies.

According to a report by the security firm FireEye Inc., North Korean hackers have been targeting South Korean cryptocurrency exchanges.

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Jason Lee/Reuters

There are perhaps no two nations more desperately in need of peace talks than North and South Korea.

Distant as this hope may seem, South Korea’s new president, Moon Jae-in, has staked his reputation on it. This son of North Korean refugees has spoken glowingly of a nuclear weapons-free peninsula, reunited as a single nation — its two halves fused just as East and West Germany became one.

Nearly 400,000 Rohingya people have fled government violence in Myanmar and crossed into neighboring Bangladesh. The majority of them are children — 60 percent, by U.N. estimates. And at least 1,100 are separated from their parents.

The challenges for aid groups are unfathomable with a refugee crisis this large, caused by what Zeid Ra'ad Al Hussein, the United Nations high commissioner for human rights, says seems to be "a textbook example of ethnic cleansing."

The situation is even more daunting when so many children are at risk.

Long after the floodwaters recede and the debris is cleared, the mental health impacts of disasters like hurricanes can linger.

Psychologist Jean Rhodes of the University of Massachusetts-Boston has spent more than a decade studying what happens to people years after a natural disaster — in this case, Hurricane Katrina.

A recent study out of Philadelphia tracked kindergartners who were learning English and found that four years later there were major discrepancies between which groups of students had mastered the language.

Students whose home language was Spanish were considerably less likely to reach proficiency than any other subgroup. And, on the extreme end, Spanish speakers were almost half as likely as Chinese speakers to cross the proficiency threshold.

Hospital pharmacist Mandy Langston remembers when Lulabelle Berry arrived at the emergency center of Stone County Medical Center in Mountain View, Ark., last year.

Berry couldn't talk. Her face was drooping on one side. Her eyes couldn't focus.

"She was basically unresponsive," Langston recalls.

Updated at 2 a.m. Saturday

Several hundred people gathered in St. Louis Friday to peacefully protest the acquittal of a police officer who was charged with the murder of a black motorist.

But after the main protest, police say "agitators" threw items including a brick at police. St. Louis police said nine police officers and one Missouri State Highway Patrol trooper were injured. At least two officers who were injured by a brick were transported to a hospital. Police Chief Lawrence O'Toole said 23 people were arrested by 6 p.m.

Just a few years ago, many car dealers and homebuilders were worried that millennials would forever want to be urban hipsters, uninterested in buying cars or homes.

But now, as millennials get older — and richer — more of them are buying SUVs to drive to their suburban homes.

The National Association of Realtors' 2017 Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends study found that millennials were the largest group of homebuyers for the fourth consecutive year.

Starting next week, Cowlitz County Jail will become the first corrections facility in the state of Washington to use body scanners on inmates entering the facility.

The machines will be used to prevent smuggling of contraband, like drugs or weapons.

Capt. Chris Moses said the new scanner takes about seven seconds to scan an inmate and will be faster and more thorough than traditional searches. 

The Oregon and Washington Secretaries of State announced Friday that they have referred dozens of cases of double-voting or dead people voting in the last presidential election for possible criminal prosecution.

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