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12:16 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

It's Rivalry Weekend In College Football

Auburn running back Onterio McCalebb (23) stiff arms Alabama defender Brent Calloway (21) during a kick return during the first half of an NCAA college football game on Saturday, Nov. 24, 2012, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. (Butch Dill/AP)

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 1:20 pm

When I was 7th grader in Durham, North Carolina, I had a teacher named Mrs. Crawford. She was a North Carolina fan. I rooted for Duke. The two universities are less than 10 miles apart. I think my rooting interest might have affected my grade.

That’s a joke but not too far from the truth. These college football rivalries are pretty serious stuff.

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NPR Story
12:16 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

Did Comet ISON Fly Too Close To The Sun?

ISON appears as a white smear heading up and away from the sun. ISON was not visible during its closest approach to the sun, so many scientists thought it had disintegrated, but images like this one from the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory suggest that a small nucleus may be intact. (ESA/NASA/SOHO/GSFC)

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 1:20 pm

Kelly Beatty, Sky and Telescopes’s senior contributing editor, joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti with the latest on the path of Comet ISON. The comet at first seemed to have fallen apart as it approached the sun’s sizzling surface, but new images today show a streak of light that some say could indicate it’s not game over just yet.

U.S. Navy solar researcher Karl Battams writes on his blog that “it does appear that at least some small fraction of ISON has remained in one piece.”

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NPR Story
12:16 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

'Tis The Season For New Cookbooks

(Hideya Hamano/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 11:55 am

Cookbooks abound this time of year, just in time for holiday feasting.

Among the stacks on NPR food and health correspondent Allison Aubrey‘s desk are cookbooks for slow cooking, gluten-free baked goods and practical books for fresh and simple foods.

She shares some of the best ones with Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti.

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NPR Story
12:16 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

Independent Retailers Look To 'Small Business Saturday'

Lizzibeth in Milwaukee is one of many small businesses hoping to capitalize on the holiday season. (LaToya Dennis/WUWM)

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 1:20 pm

Small, locally-owned retailers are also trying to cash in the holiday shopping rush with Small Business Saturday tomorrow.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, LaToya Dennis of WUWM in Milwaukee reports that small players can face a challenge that big box stores don’t have to worry about: marketing.

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NPR Story
12:16 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

Top Amazon Reviewers Get Big Perks

Michael Erb gets thousands of dollars in free merchandise for being a top reviewer on Amazon. (Michael E Mobile Sound/Facebook)

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 1:20 pm

Whether or not you read them, the customer reviews on retailers’ websites have enormous value, mostly for the company.

The more a product is reviewed, the more likely it is that people will buy that product and the more money companies such as Amazon make.

So the benefits of online reviews are obvious for retailers, but what’s in it for the most prolific reviewers? For Amazon’s top reviewers, the benefits are tangible.

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The Salt
11:55 am
Fri November 29, 2013

Party Like It's 1799: Traditional Cider Makes A Comeback

Chuck Shelton in the cold room at Albemarle CiderWorks in Virginia, which makes sparkling alcoholic cider with some of the same apple varieties used by Thomas Jefferson.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 9:51 am

Feeling extra American this week? Wanna keep that post-turkey glow going? Well, how about a very American beverage: cider?

We're not talking about the hot mulled stuff that steams up your kitchen, or the sweet pub draft in a pint glass. This cider is more like sparkling wine.

"This is a phenomenally funky, sour, even mildly smoky cider that has to be tasted to be believed," says Greg Engert, one of the owners of a bar in Washington called ChurchKey. He's pouring cider from a tall champagne-style bottle that retails for around $15.

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StoryCorps' National Day Of Listening
11:55 am
Fri November 29, 2013

Neither Impeachment Nor An ER Page Could Keep Them Apart

Nina Totenberg and David Reines at their wedding in 2000.
Courtesy of Nina Totenberg

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 3:49 pm

Friday is the National Day of Listening, a chance to sit down with a loved one, turn on an audio recorder and ask that person about his or her life. NPR's Nina Totenberg chose to talk with her husband about how they first met — and then found one another again years later.

You can find tips on how to record your conversation at nationaldayoflistening.org.

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Around the Nation
11:55 am
Fri November 29, 2013

From Shop Class To Shipyard: Oregon's Plan For Industrial Interns

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 3:49 pm

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

President Obama often talks about making sure American students graduate high school ready for college. But one program in Oregon is reaching out to the shop class crowd of students who would rather learn a paying trade right away than stay in a classroom. Manufacturers there are using a new internship program to recruit and train teenagers straight out of high school to be machinists, welders and painters. Oregon Public Broadcasting's Rob Manning reports.

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Environment
11:55 am
Fri November 29, 2013

'Forecast Bust:' Why 2013 Hurricane Predictions Were So Wrong

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 3:49 pm

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, BYLINE: It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro. The 2013 Atlantic hurricane season ends tomorrow. It'll be remembered as one of the quietest on record. Since June, there have been just two hurricanes, both were relatively weak. As NPR's Jon Hamilton reports, forecasters were expecting something very different.

JON HAMILTON, BYLINE: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration told Americans to expect an unusually active year with between seven and 11 hurricanes. Other forecasters offered variations on that theme.

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Around the Nation
11:55 am
Fri November 29, 2013

Costumed As Homeless, Mormon Bishop Teaches A Lesson In Compassion

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 3:49 pm

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, BYLINE: Finally, this hour, a Mormon bishop in Taylorsville, Utah, went to great lengths last Sunday to teach his congregation a lesson. David Musselman disguised himself as a homeless person with the help of a professional makeup artist friend. After getting mutton-chops, a ski hat and thick glasses, the bishop waited outside his church and wished congregants a happy Thanksgiving. To describe what happened next, I'm joined by Bishop Musselman, welcome to the program.

BISHOP DAVID MUSSELMAN: Glad to be here. Thanks, Ari.

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Business
11:55 am
Fri November 29, 2013

Black Friday's Mission Creep: When The Holiday Deals Are Elsewhere

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 3:49 pm

Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving, is one the busiest, most hectic shopping day of the year. But how important is it for retailers and as an indicator of the strength of the holiday shopping season?

Business
11:55 am
Fri November 29, 2013

'Retail Theater:' Inflated Retail Prices Meant To Look Like Steals

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 3:49 pm

Ari Shapiro talks with Wall Street Journal reporter Suzanne Kapner about the fake discounts retailers build into their products during the holiday season.

Code Switch
11:55 am
Fri November 29, 2013

New Pilot Program Gives Immigrant Detainees Public Defenders

Matthew Diller, dean of Yeshiva University's Cardozo School of Law, talks with press about the New York Immigrant Family Unity Project in June.
Cardozo School of Law

Originally published on Thu December 12, 2013 8:34 am

In the American criminal justice system, you have the right to an attorney. And if you cannot afford an attorney, one will be appointed for you.

That's not the case if you're a defendant in U.S. immigration court. Immigration proceedings are civil matters, and the Constitution does not extend the right to court-appointed attorneys to immigrant detainees.

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Around the Nation
11:55 am
Fri November 29, 2013

In A Small Town With Big Events, Some Are Tiring Of Tourism

In Traverse City, which has hosted the National Cherry Festival since 1926, some residents say festivals occupy the public park too much, while others say it's a reasonable price to pay for the money it brings to businesses.
Traverse City Tourism AP

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 7:29 pm

Many small towns across the country are using special events to attract visitors and commerce. The strategy has been a big hit in places like Aspen, Colo., and Park City, Utah, whose names have become synonymous with major festivals.

But it can take a toll. Some residents in the northern Michigan town of Traverse City complain that they're suffering from festival fatigue and would like a little less excitement.

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Health
11:55 am
Fri November 29, 2013

As HealthCare.Gov's Deadline Approaches, What Will Be Ready?

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 3:49 pm

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Ari Shapiro. Tomorrow is judgment day for healthcare.gov. The Obama administration has repeatedly said that by November 30, the troubled website will be up and running for the vast majority of users, and officials say they're on track to reach that goal.

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