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Movie Reviews
9:07 am
Fri March 21, 2014

A Teen On The Hunt, And Maybe In Over Her Head

Fourteen-year-old Lila (Gina Persanti) spends her summer looking for love — and finds a rough-edged older boy in It Felt Like Love.
Variance Films

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 2:03 pm

Feared and feared for in equal measure, today's teenagers are prisoners of pop and punditry. Branded as bad seeds or delicate flowers, they take shape in the public mind as either neglected or overprotected by their parents, abused by or abusive of the Internet, oversexed or terrified of sex. Is coming of age the pits, or what?

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Game Conference
9:07 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Sony Steps Into Virtual Reality With 'Project Morpheus'

Marcus Ingvarsson (right) tests out the PlayStation 4 virtual reality headset Project Morpheus in a demo area at the Game Developers Conference 2014 in San Francisco on Wednesday.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 11:52 am

All this week the video game industry has been gathered in San Francisco for the annual Game Developers Conference. It's where the wizards behind the games — the artists, programmers, writers and the companies they work for — meet to talk, hold panels, pick each other's brains and show off their latest creations.

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Movie Reviews
9:07 am
Fri March 21, 2014

It's Either Art Or A Fire Hose, And We're Calling It The Latter

James (James Franco) is a retired actor who may or may not be suffering from a degenerative mental illness in Maladies, an art film from New York painter, sculptor and filmmaker Carter.
Tribeca Films

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 3:10 pm

Many years ago, the great and grumpy British TV writer Dennis Potter (The Singing Detective, Pennies From Heaven) rounded a corner in a prominent New York art museum and stood wondering whether the coiled thingy on the wall in front of him was a work of art or an emergency fire hose.

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Movie Interviews
9:07 am
Fri March 21, 2014

From Action Hero To Teenage Nerd, Shailene Woodley Has Range

Shailene Woodley, pictured at this year's Independent Spirit Awards, stars in the forthcoming Divergent, a big-screen adaptation of the first book in Veronica Roth's dystopian trilogy.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 4:45 am

"I'm sorry you have to see my pancake face."

Those are among Shailene Woodley's first words as she opens the door to a suite in the Beverly Wilshire Hotel. She's got a publicists' luncheon later in the day — otherwise, she explains, under absolutely no condition would she have worn makeup for an interview.

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StoryCorps
9:07 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Animal Rescuers Create Joy Amid Chaos After Exxon Valdez Spill

Suzanne Bishop (left) and LJ Evans met while volunteering at an animal rescue center in Alaska after the Exxon Valdez spill in 1989.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 9:21 am

It's been 25 years since the Exxon Valdez ran aground off the coast of Alaska, spilling millions of gallons of oil into Prince William Sound.

The impact on wildlife was devastating. Cleanup crews poured into the nearby port town, also called Valdez, where an animal rescue center was set up.

"The chaos is incredibly difficult to describe or even imagine," says LJ Evans, a local resident who volunteered to help. "Somebody came back with the first bird — the reporters were so frantic, somebody got in a fight trying to take a picture of this poor little oiled bird."

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Health News
9:07 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Why Cholera Persists In Haiti Despite An Abundance Of Aid

A makeshift latrine hangs over the water at the edge of Cite de Dieu, a slum in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 5:14 am

It's been more than three years since cholera struck Haiti. And the epidemic continues today.

The deadly bacteria have killed more than 8,500 people and infected hundreds of thousands.

Why has the outbreak been so hard to stop, even with more than $9 million in foreign aid pledged to Haiti?

Lack of sanitation, says journalist Jonathan Katz, who has been covering the cholera epidemic since it began.

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The Two-Way
9:05 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Thai Court Throws Out Election, Thrusting Country Back Into Limbo

Crowds of people railed against the Thai Constitutional Court's ruling during a rally Friday in central Bangkok.
Athit Perawongmetha Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 10:37 am

Thailand's Constitutional Court has voided results from last month's national election, which returned Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra and her party to power despite a boycott by the opposition.

The decision has thrown the country back into a state of political uncertainty and stoked fears of renewed violence between the premier's supporters and anti-government protesters.

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Affordable Care Act
8:59 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Independent Audit Outlines Problems At Cover Oregon

Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber called the audit of Cover Oregon a ' sobering critique' of the state's health insurance exchange.
Office of the Governor

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 2:53 pm

According to a scathing audit from an independent consultant, Oregon's health insurance exchange was riddled with internal conflict and unrealistic expectations.

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Barbershop
8:58 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Can Phil Jackson Turn NY Knicks Into Winners?

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 9:34 am

The Barbershop guys weigh in on their billion dollar bracket picks, Phil Jackson's return to the New York Knicks, and whether singer M.I.A. should pay a hefty NFL fine.

Remembrances
8:58 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Westboro Baptist's Fred Phelps: More Than A Hater?

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 9:34 am

Westboro Baptist Church founder Fred Phelps died on Wednesday. He's best remembered for his anti-gay views, and for leading protests at funerals. But he once was viewed as a fighter for civil rights.

Your Health
8:58 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Saturated Fat Is Back!

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 9:34 am

Americans have long been told to stay away from foods high in saturated fats. But new research suggests they might not be as bad for you as once thought.

The Two-Way
8:42 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Feathers Fly As Top Turkish Officials Square Off Over Twitter Ban

Dado Ruvic Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 11:03 am

A move by embattled Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan to shut down Twitter in Turkey looks to be backfiring. The hashtag #TwitterblockedinTurkey quickly spread upon news of the ban, and the country's own president tweeted his disdain.

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The Salt
8:01 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Why 500 Million U.S. Seafood Meals Get Dumped In The Sea

A marlin caught as bycatch by the California drift gillnet fishery. The conservation group Oceana called the fishery one of the "dirtiest" in the U.S. because of its high rate of discarded fish and other marine animals.
Courtesy of NOAA

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 12:04 pm

Seafood often travels huge distances over many days to reach the people who eat it. And it's often impossible to know where a fillet of fish or a few frozen shrimp came from — and, perhaps more importantly, just how they were caught.

Fortunately, activists are doing the homework for us, and what they're telling us could make your next fish dinner a little less tasty.

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Preoccupation With Safety
7:39 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Kids These Days: Growing Up Too Fast Or Never At All?

Hanna Rosin says when kids do things that feel risky on a playground, it allows them to conquer a fear and gain independence.
Fox Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 3:20 pm

On the cover of the April issue of The Atlantic there's a picture of a boy who could be 6 or 7. He's looking to the right toward an adult, whose hand he's holding. He's also wearing a helmet and knee pads. And — for further protection — he has a pillow strapped to his torso.

The cover art is for Hanna Rosin's article, "Hey Parents: Leave Those Kids Alone," about the overprotected child.

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Shots - Health News
7:25 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Teenage Drinkers Go For High-End Liquor And Cheap Beer, Too

A college student reaches for a beer during spring break in Miami.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 9:40 am

For underage drinkers, it's not always about the cheapest alcohol they can get their hands on. Many of them are brand conscious, researchers say, and they're not drinking the same stuff as their parents.

Young drinkers do go for sweet malt beverages that mask the taste of alcohol with fruit flavors; 17 percent said they'd had a Smirnoff malt beverage, which comes in flavors like grape and frozen strawberry lemonade.

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