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The Two-Way
1:53 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

USAID Says Building Of 'Cuban Twitter' Was Part Of Public Record

A book street vendor passes the time on her smart phone as she waits for customers in Havana, Cuba, on Tuesday. The Obama administration secretly financed a social network in Cuba to stir political unrest.
Ramon Espinosa AP

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 1:08 pm

The United States Agency for International Development came out swinging today against an Associated Press report that said the agency used public funds to build a social media platform designed to undermine the Cuban government.

In a blog post, USAID says the wire agency "falsely characterized" the program.

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Parallels
1:53 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

After Voting, Afghans Must Now Wait For A Winner

A worker with Afghanistan's Independent Election Commission unloads ballot boxes in Kabul. Ballots have been coming in from all over the country, but results are not expected to be announced for about two weeks. In addition, there will likely be a runoff election between the top two candidates in June.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 4:29 pm

Millions of Afghans voted on Saturday, but it's still going to be weeks, and quite possibly months, before they learn who the new president will be.

"We don't know who has won," says Thijs Berman, head of the EU Election Assessment Team. "We know that the Taliban has lost."

Election officials counted votes at local polling places immediately after they closed. Then they posted a public copy of the results on the outside of each polling center, and sent the original tally sheet and ballots to the provincial capitals.

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All Tech Considered
1:53 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Silicon Valley Buying Spree: A Tech Bubble, Or Strategy At Play?

Are we in a tech bubble about to burst? Facebook bought WhatsApp for $19 billion earlier this year. WhatsApp CEO Jan Koum speaks during a conference at the Mobile World Congress 2014 in Spain.
David Ramos Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 6:22 am

Over the past few months, the country's biggest technology firms have spent billions buying startups. Are we watching another tech bubble about to burst?

In this year's first quarter, Google and Facebook, alone, announced deals worth more than $24 billion on little companies that have almost no revenue. Those deals seem to have spooked Wall Street; last week, technology stocks plunged and the tech-heavy Nasdaq index fell nearly 1.2 percent Monday.

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Seattle Outbreak
1:53 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Measles At A Rock Concert Goes Viral In A Bad Way

This one's virus-free: Matthew Followill, Nathan Followill and Caleb Followill of Kings of Leon performed in Los Angeles in December.
Kevin Winter Getty Images for Radio.com

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 8:54 am

If you went to see the Kings of Leon concert on March 28 in Seattle, let's hope you came home with nothing but great memories.

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The Two-Way
1:46 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

WATCH: Giant Container Ship Collides With Hong Kong Park

The 633-foot container ship Hanza Constitution runs aground in Hong Kong.
YouTube

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 5:47 am

Such are the hazards of living in a city that is also home to one of the world's busiest ports ...

Joggers are used to dodging bikers, skateboarders and even stray animals. But if you'd happened to be running on a popular path at the Stanley Ho Sports Center in Hong Kong's Pok Fu Lam district on Sunday, you might have come close to hitting a 633-foot container ship.

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Operatic Firsts
1:45 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Two Leads, Two Deaths In 18 Hours

Kristine Opolais made her Madama Butterfly debut as Cio-Cio-San, only to get a last-minute call to play Mimi in La Boheme.
Marty Sohl Metropolitan Opera

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 4:29 pm

Over the weekend, soprano Kristine Opolais sang her heart out — and died twice.

Friday evening she had sung the lead in Puccini's Madama Butterfly. It was her debut in that role at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. It was a big deal. Opolais was so excited about it that she stayed up until five the next morning.

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Traveling With Ivory
1:44 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Musicians, Take Note: Your Instrument May Be Contraband

Antique bows were often made with a small piece of ivory that clamps the bow hairs onto the wood.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 4:29 pm

New Obama administration rules aimed at protecting African elephants are causing widespread anxiety in the music world. From country to classical, working musicians say the policy will make them think twice about touring abroad.

The proposed regulations would place a near-total ban on anything made with ivory moving in and out of the U.S.

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NPR Story
1:06 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Art Imitates Life For Transgender Artists

From the "Relationship" series, 2008–2013 by Zackary Drucker and Rhys Ernst. Courtesy of the artists and Luis De Jesus Los Angeles.

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 11:07 am

The Whitney Biennial has been one of the art world’s hottest shows for new artists.

This year, artists Rhys Ernst and Zackary Drucker are grabbing attention with their photo series, “Relationship.”

The photos detail their developing relationship and their transitioning bodies, as each travels across the gender spectrum. Ernst is transitioning from female to male, while Drucker is transitioning from male to female.

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NPR Story
1:06 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Rwanda Marks Terrible Anniversary

Today, Rwanda and the world remember the beginning of one of the bloodiest periods in modern history.

It’s been 20 years since the Rwandan genocide resulted in the massacre of at least 800,000 ethnic Tutsis and moderate Hutus in just three months.

The BBC’s Prudent Nsengiyumva reports from Kigali.

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NPR Story
1:06 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

The Mystery Surrounding The Johnson Twins of Tennessee

Residents of Chattanooga, Tenn., are still puzzling over the mystery of Andrew Gary Johnson and Anthony Larry Johnson.

Police discovered the decayed bodies of the twin brothers in their home a little over a week ago. But investigators think the brothers — who were in their early 60s — died about three years ago.

How they died is a mystery.

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News
1:03 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Deep-Sea Ping May Lead To Malaysian Jet — But Time's Running Out

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 4:29 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Earlier today, Australian authorities said they may have a signal from the missing Malaysian airliner that disappeared a month ago on its way to Beijing. A ship far out in the Indian Ocean has picked up a signal that could be from the missing airliner's black boxes. Investigators need those boxes to determine what happened to Malaysian Air Flight 370.

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News
1:03 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Oscar Pistorius Takes The Stand, Opening With Apology

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 4:29 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

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Sports
1:03 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

In NCAA Finals, Two Recent Champions On Unlikely Rides

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 4:29 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

It's Huskies versus Wildcats as the Men's Division I college basketball season comes to an end tonight. Facing off are two recent champions: the University of Connecticut, who won in 2011, and the University of Kentucky who won in 2012. They've both had improbable rides to tonight's title game.

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Layers Of Meaning
1:03 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

In New Exhibit, Running Shoes Are Potent Symbol Of Boston Bombing

A pair of running shoes left at the Boston Marathon memorial last year.
Jesse Costa WBUR

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 4:29 pm

In the wake of most tragedies, makeshift memorials fill up with flowers and teddy bears. After the Boston Marathon bombings last April, running shoes became potent symbols in the vast memorial there.

Now, after months in storage at the cavernous City Archives, a group of objects left at the site are in a new exhibition at the Boston Public Library.

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From Our Listeners
1:03 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Letters: Athletic And Academic Demands In College

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 4:29 pm

Melissa Block and Audie Cornish read letters from listeners about the demands made on students and student-athletes in college.

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