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Africa
2:42 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Somalis In Kenya Are Used To Raids, But They Say This Was Different

Kenyan security officers rounded up people Friday as part of a crackdown that has swept up thousands of undocumented refugees, immigrants and Kenyan citizens of Somali descent in recent weeks.
Tony Karumba AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 5:12 pm

Mohammed Ali Isaac's hands shook as he showed his Kenyan ID to the police officers. They let him pass, but his cousins weren't so lucky. The two women had forgotten their IDs at home, and the police were threatening to load them into one of three large trucks they'd brought for the purpose.

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NPR Story
2:40 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Obama's Asian Trade Mission Faces Obstacles At Home

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 12:24 pm

Next week, President Obama is going to Asia, where he’ll talk up a proposed deal to increase U.S. trade with that region.

If he succeeds, he could open up huge new markets for U.S. farmers and manufacturers, strengthen U.S. influence in Asia and set a path to greater prosperity. At least, that’s what the White House says.

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NPR Story
2:40 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Hundreds Still Missing In South Korea Ferry Disaster

South Korean rescue workers search for missing passengers near the buoy installed to mark a capsized ferry at sea off Jindo on April 18. Divers renewed efforts today to access the capsized ferry. Of the 400 people who were on board, 200 are still missing. (Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 12:24 pm

The rescue and recovery mission continues off the southern coast of South Korea after a ferry carrying over 400 people capsized this week.

More than 200 people are missing, and bad weather threatens to diminish recovery efforts.

Jason Strother joins Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti from Seoul with the latest information on rescue efforts.

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The Two-Way
2:39 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

China Admits That One-Fifth Of Its Farmland Is Contaminated

Xiang Zhengming plants rice seedlings in a field in southeast China's Fujian Province earlier this month. A newly released report says nearly 20 percent of the country's farmland is contaminated.
Lin Shanchuan Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 4:43 pm

Unbridled industrialization with almost no environmental regulation has resulted in the toxic contamination of one-fifth of China's farmland, the Communist Party has acknowledged for the first time.

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World
2:39 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Leaflets Given To Donetsk Jews Made Waves Worldwide, But Not In Donetsk

An anti-fascist sign hangs on the barricade outside an occupied government building in Donetsk.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 4:13 pm

A development in Eastern Ukraine has set social media on fire and triggered outrage around the world.

In the city of Donetsk, someone distributed fliers ordering Jews to register with the separatists who have taken over government buildings.

Even though nobody in Ukraine believed the leaflet was real, the fliers hit a nerve.

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NPR Story
2:07 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Salsa Is Food, Not Music

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 2:41 pm

We call the music salsa, but is that really the right name? We talk to our guests about salsa as a marketing term, whether or not it's a rhythm, and what we really mean when we say salsa.

NPR Story
2:07 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Cosby Represents

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 2:41 pm

As an entertainer, Bill Cosby included Latin music and many Latino actors. Host Maria Hinojosa and producer Daisy Rosario talk about what seeing Latinos represented in Cosby's work has meant to them.

NPR Story
2:07 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Sabiduría: Lessons In Longevity

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 2:41 pm

Pianist and composer Irving Fields was born in Brooklyn in 1915. After hearing Latin music in Cuba, he became one of the foremost interpreters of American-style Rumba. He's still performing today.

The Two-Way
2:02 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Rescue Workers Erect Memorial To Washington Mudslide Victims

A memorial erected by rescue workers near the site of the March 22 mudslide that killed at least 39 people.
Martin Kaste NPR

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 7:35 pm

Rescue workers still searching for bodies from the March 22 landslide that killed at least 39 people near the town of Oso, Washington, erected a simple, but moving memorial to the victims of the tragedy. Four people are still listed as missing.

NPR's Martin Kaste, who took the photo, says the rescue effort is in a "transition phase" as crews from other states are leaving and being replaced by fresh searchers.

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All Tech Considered
2:01 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Airbnb To Start Charging Hotel Taxes In A Handful Of Cities

Airbnb, the online home-rental service, says it will start collecting hotel taxes in a few American cities.
Chris Weeks Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 4:13 pm

When Regitze Visby, a tourist visiting San Francisco from Denmark, searched for accommodations for her trip and saw she could stay at one of the famed "painted ladies" on Alamo Square through Airbnb, she took it.

At $135 a night, "it was a good deal," she says.

But does she know if she's paying a transient occupancy tax or a hotel tax? "I have no idea," she says.

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It's All Politics
1:46 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Obama: Your Question, Ms. Keith?

Snapshots from a NPR White House correspondent's life. That's Tamara Keith's Air Force 1 selfie (bottom left), and her asking the president a question at Thursday's press conference (upper right).
Tamara Keith NPR

Originally published on Sat April 19, 2014 3:04 am

I officially became NPR's White House correspondent in January. But the job didn't seem real until Thursday at 3:56 p.m., when the president of the United States looked down at a white note card and said "ahhhh, Tamara Keith."

That was my cue to ask a question — my first at a presidential press conference.

Here's what the experience felt like — and how it happened.

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Sports
1:44 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Welcome, Spring — And More Importantly, Playoff Hockey

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 4:13 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

After the marathon, Boston sports fans will still have playoff hockey. If you pay attention to the National Hockey League, then you probably heard or maybe even said that there's nothing like the playoffs. And judging from the start of this year's playoffs, it's not an exaggeration. Here to talk more about it is sportswriter Stefan Fatsis. And, Stefan, the NHL playoffs began on Wednesday, but just how exciting have these first games been?

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Shots - Health News
1:41 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

One Scientist's Quest To Vanquish Epileptic Seizures

The dream of epilepsy research, says neurobiologist Ivan Soltesz, is to stop seizures by manipulating only some brain cells, not all.
Steve Zylius UC Irvine Communications

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 4:13 pm

In the early 1990s, a young brain researcher named Ivan Soltesz heard a story that would shape his career.

His adviser told him about a school for children whose epileptic seizures were so severe and frequent that they had to wear helmets to prevent head injuries. The only exception to the helmet rule was for students who received an award.

"The big deal for them is that they can take the helmet off while they're walking across the stage," Soltesz says. "And that thing struck me as just wrong."

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Around the Nation
1:08 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Marathon Safety Embraced By Boston, For The Most Part

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 4:13 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This year's Boston Marathon will take place on Monday, and it will have a lot more security than in the past. Last year, of course, two bombs near the finish line killed three people and injured dozens more. Afterwards, Massachusetts authorities spent months developing a new security plan. The goal was to create an environment that's safe and secure but still allows people to have fun. Whether the plan can achieve that remains an open question, as NPR's Jeff Brady reports.

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Music Interviews
1:08 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

On Latest Album, Gina Chavez Unearths Her Latin Roots

Up.Rooted is singer-songwriter Gina Chavez's sophomore effort and her first full-length album.
Judson Baker Courtesy of Press Junkie

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 4:13 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Texas native Gina Chavez did not come to music early on. When she was 18, she went to a country-blues show in Austin to hear singer Toni Price. It was after that she decided she wanted to learn how to play guitar. So she turned to her dad.

GINA CHAVEZ: You know, I said, hey, dad, don't you have a guitar in the closet? He pulls it out and turns out it's a 1954 Martin, which people who know things about guitars are, you know, they start drooling all over themselves.

CORNISH: A year later, she started writing her own songs.

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