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Nearly 9 in 10 Americans believe that "a zero-tolerance policy for sexual harassment is essential to bringing about change in our society."

At a time when partisan opinions are so polarized on a range of issues, Republicans and Democrats are relatively similar in believing that society should crack down hard on sexual harassment, a new poll from Ipsos and NPR suggests.

There were no reindeer hitched to this flight, but an Airbus 380 crew was on a mission Wednesday to present some holiday joy.

And it delivered.

The team aboard the Airbus A380 test flight traced a colossal Christmas tree over Germany — the tip poised over Hamburg in the north all the way to the stump over Stuttgart.

Flightradar24 tracks flights in real time and displayed the image, saying it took some 5 1/2 hours to complete.

An organization representing the interests of small farmers across rural America fired a legal salvo Thursday aimed at a Trump administration they feel has let them down.

The New York Times announced today that come January, it will have a new publisher. But the name at the top of the masthead won't be changing much.

The person who will replace Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, Jr. in helming the Gray Lady? His 37-year-old son, Arthur Gregg Sulzberger, known as A.G.

On Wednesday, Portland City Council voted 3-1 to allow the Portland Art Museum to move forward with the controversial new Rothko Pavilion.

The museum announced plans for the pavilion a year ago. It would serve as a new entrance that would connect the museum’s two existing buildings and fix its notoriously inaccessible and confusing layout.

As public support for the death penalty wanes, the number of executions and projected death sentences in 2017 rose only slightly, remaining at nearly 25-year lows, according to the annual report released Thursday by the Death Penalty Information Center.

There were 23 executions this year, the center says. Over the past 25 years, only last year's total, 20, was lower.

With wildfires still raging across parts of Southern California, dozens of schools have been closed. Many will stay that way till the new year. That gives educators valuable time to think about what they can do, when school resumes, to help students who have been traumatized by these fires.

It has been more than nine months since a family in Canada realized that UPS lost a bank draft worth $846,000 (Canadian) that was sent to an inheritor. So far, the only money recovered is the $32 it cost to ship the document. The family's bank, TD Canada Trust, has delayed issuing a new bank draft.

Lorette Taylor, who lives in Ontario, was distributing the proceeds from her late father's estate when she tried to send an inheritance to her brother, Louis Paul Hebert, who lives near Cornwall, Ontario, some 270 miles from the office of the family's lawyer.

Director Spike Lee was just 29 years old in 1986 when he released his first feature film, She's Gotta Have It. The movie told the story of a young black artist named Nola Darling who loves sex but isn't interested in a committed relationship with any of the three men she is dating.

Lee, now 60, says he made She's Gotta Have It because he wanted to show a woman "living her life, and not really caring about what people feel."

Clark County Council Revisits Ban On Cannabis Shops

Dec 14, 2017

Despite being legal in Oregon and Washington, cannabis businesses in unincorporated Clark County are banned. During a workshop session on Wednesday, the Clark County Council took the first step toward revisiting the issue.

The ban has been in place since 2014 and has kept the cannabis industry out of areas like Salmon Creek and Hazel Dell.

The council is revisiting the moratorium and heard from a panel that included public health officials, the sheriff’s office and other representatives from the county.

Exploring 3,000 Years Of Jerusalem History

Dec 14, 2017

With guest host Tom Gjelten. 

Now that President Trump formally recognizes Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, we’re exploring the city’s 3,000 years of multicultural history.

This show airs Thursday at 11 a.m. EST. 

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee on Thursday rolled out his proposal for an update to the state’s two-year, $43 billion budget. Here are the top five items on the governor’s budget wish list:

George Lampman is a veteran of the Korean War, but he didn't get through it alone.

George first arrived in Seoul as a 21-year-old Marine, part of a security detachment at the US Embassy. It was 1949.

He vividly remembers meeting Lee Sook Ei, a switchboard operator at the embassy.

“She was a beautiful girl [and] very, very intelligent,” George says.

He tried to ask Sook Ei out more than once, but he struck out.  

Here's a fantasy: A world where you never had to wait in line at the Department of Motor Vehicles. Save for the driving test, you could do almost everything online — from changing your address to renewing your license.

Other things in life — like voting and going to the doctor — would work just as efficiently. Any doctor you'd visit would already have access to your digitally stored medical records, and you’d never have to fill out one of those medical history forms in the waiting room.

Restoring The Upper Deschutes River, Part 2

Dec 14, 2017

Copyright 2017 Oregon Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit Oregon Public Broadcasting.

80 Homeless People Died In Multnomah County In 2016

Dec 14, 2017

Eighty people who were homeless in Multnomah County died in 2016, according to a report released Thursday.

That's similar to the number of deaths of homeless people the county recorded in 2015: 88, the highest number since the record-keeping began.  

The report is titled “Domicile Unknown,” after the box the medical examiner marks on paperwork to indicate a person was homeless.

The report highlights the dramatically lower life expectancy of people who live on the street. 

Months after Puerto Rico was hit by back-to-back hurricanes, the island’s artistic community faces considerable challenges in its path toward recovery. Hurricane María — the second and more devastating storm — dealt a crippling blow to an already weakened power grid, resulting in a protracted blackout.

    

The Portland Public School Board has voted to reopen Harriet Tubman Middle School to serve North and Northeast Portland. But that’s pending an environmental review, and that might be difficult for a building that sits 20 feet from Interstate 5. Journalist Daniel Forbes fills us in.

    

Beginning early next year, a group of Washington drivers will be keeping close tabs on the number of miles they drive and how much they spend on gas. They will be part of a pilot program to test out a proposed pay-by-the-mile road tax, similar to what Oregon rolled out in 2015.

The number of teens abusing drugs is lower than it's been since the 1990s, according to a national survey.

"In particular, we see a tremendous decline in the portion of young people using cigarettes," Dr. Lloyd Johnson, a study researcher at the University of Michigan, said at a press conference on Thursday. "The changes we're seeing are very large and very important."

Russian President Vladimir Putin held his annual news conference on Thursday, an event that commonly runs for hours, offering a kaleidoscope-like glimpse of Putin's view of his country and the world. In this year's edition, the topics ranged from President Trump to Russia's ban at the 2018 Winter Olympics — and the state of the fishing industry in Murmansk.

Heading North: American Doctors Report Back From Canada

Dec 14, 2017

For Peter Cram, an American internist who spent most of his career practicing in Iowa City, Iowa, moving to Toronto in 2014 was an easy decision.

He says he is among a handful of American doctors who went north to practice in Canada's single-payer system. Now he doesn't worry about whether his patients can afford treatment. "Everyone gets a basic level of care," he says, which lets him focus on their medical needs instead of their finances.

Penitent penguins. A seal aghast. A turbocharged wigeon, a vain gnu and a kickboxing kangaroo.

The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards are back. This year's winners were announced Thursday morning.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A new study finds that a lot of money is flowing into races for state Supreme Court. Millions of dollars are coming from sometimes mysterious donors, and a lot of it goes to negative advertising. Here's NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

President Trump, nearing the end of his first year in office, appears close to a big win in Congress. He is urging lawmakers to move quickly now that House and Senate Republicans say they have agreed on a tax plan.

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