NPR News

Pages

NPR Story
1:33 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Some States Opt to Make Guns Legal On Campus

Students walk on the campus of Lewis-Clark State College in Idaho. The college's president is among those who does not support a new law allowing guns on campus. (Lewis-Clark State College)

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 1:00 pm

Next month is the seventh anniversary of the mass shooting on the Virginia Tech campus, in which 32 people were killed and 30 others were injured.

Many states have reacted by enacting stricter gun control laws, but other states are making it easier to carry guns on campus.

Idaho recently became the seventh state to allow concealed weapons on campus at public colleges, in spite of opposition from college presidents in Idaho, including Anthony Fernandez at Lewis-Clark State College in Lewiston, Idaho.

Read more
Deep In The Heart Of (A Transforming) Texas
1:33 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Drilling Frenzy Fuels Sudden Growth In Small Texas Town

This nighttime NASA satellite image from 2012 shows lights from drilling sites and natural gas flaring along the Eagle Ford Shale.
NASA

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 5:12 pm

South Texas is in the midst of a massive oil boom. In just a few years, it has totally transformed once-sleepy communities along a crescent swoosh known as the Eagle Ford Shale formation and has brought unexpected prosperity — along with a host of new concerns.

Among the towns drastically changed by the drilling is Cotulla, southwest of San Antonio, about 70 miles up from the border with Mexico. The area is called brush country — flat, dry ranch land, scrubby with mesquite and parched by drought.

Read more
Helping Or Hurting Charity?
1:33 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

A Year After Bombings, Some Say 'Boston Strong' Has Gone Overboard

The phrase Boston Strong sprang up after last year's marathon bombings and is now ubiquitous around town. But some wonder if the commercialization of the slogan also trivializes the tragedy.
Tovia Smith NPR

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 5:12 pm

The phrase Boston Strong emerged almost immediately after last year's marathon bombings as an unofficial motto of a city responding to tragedy. But now some are wondering whether the slogan is being overused.

The words are everywhere: Boston Strong is plastered on cars, cut into the grass at Fenway, tattooed on arms, bedazzled on sweatshirts and printed on T-shirts (and everything else).

Read more
The Fresh Air Interview
1:20 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Songwriters Behind 'Frozen' Let Go Of The Princess Mythology

Frozen is the tale of sisters Anna and Elsa, whose relationship is captured in music by songwriters Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez.
Courtesy of Walt Disney Pictures

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 5:29 am

If you have young children, you may know by heart the songs from the Disney animated musical Frozen, including its massively ubiquitous "Let It Go." The songwriting team behind the Oscar-winning hit is Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez, a married couple with two children who each sing on the soundtrack.

Read more
Entrepreneurship
1:02 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

How Rwanda's Only Ice Cream Shop Challenges Cultural Taboos

Alphansine Uwimana writes an order at Inzozi Nziza, or Sweet Dreams, Rwanda's first and only ice cream shop. There are logistical challenges, like power cuts, as well as cultural ones in a country where ice cream is not traditionally popular and women don't often run businesses.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 5:44 am

Rwanda has a warm climate, and the people love milk. You'd think ice cream would be an easy sell.

But mention ice cream to Chantal Kabatesi, and she rubs her jaw like she's at the dentist with a toothache. When she first tasted ice cream at the age of 35 "it was like eating hailstones," the kind that fall on her childhood village once or twice a year.

"I thought, 'Oh no, what are we serving to our customers? Is it dangerous?' " she said.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:01 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

GM To Take $1.3 Billion Charge Linked To Recall

General Motors CEO Mary Barra testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, last Wednesday.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 1:19 pm

General Motors said on Thursday it will take a charge of $1.3 billion in the first quarter to cover its recall of more than 2 million vehicles, primarily for ignition switch problems.

The announcement comes on the same day that the Detroit automaker said it would need to make additional fixes to the ignition switch mechanism on some of the 2.2 million cars it has already recalled. GM also said it was suspending two engineers with pay in a disciplinary move related to the problem.

Read more
NPR Story
1:00 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Marking The 50th Anniversary Of The Civil Rights Act

This week, U.S. presidents are heading to Austin, Texas, to commemorate the 50-year anniversary of the the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Former presidents Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush are all scheduled to speak in addition to President Obama at the Civil Rights Summit at the Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library in Austin, Texas.

Read more
NPR Story
1:00 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

DJ Sessions: 'Vibey' And Melodic With Anthony Valadez

Brooklyn electro-soul duo Denitia and Sene are among the artists KCRW DJ Anthony Valadez introduces us to in the latest installment of Here & Now DJ Sessions. (Mats Bakken)

KCRW’s Anthony Valadez joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson for the latest installment of DJ Sessions.

From Brooklyn electro-soul duo Denitia and Sene to Toronto jazz trio BadBadNotGood, he brings us “vibey” and melodic sounds that might make you want to roll down your car window and drive.

Read more
Shots - Health News
12:06 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Scientists Publish Recipe For Making Bird Flu More Contagious

Street vendors sell chickens at a market in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, in early 2013. Last year Cambodia reported more cases of H5N1 bird flu than any other country.
Mak Remissa EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 12:13 pm

The Dutch virologist accused of engineering a dangerous superflu a few years ago is back with more contentious research.

In 2011, Ron Fouchier and his team at Erasmus Medical Center took the H5N1 flu virus and made it more contagious. Now the team has published another study with more details on the exact genetic changes needed to do the trick.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:35 am
Thu April 10, 2014

Obama: 'The Story Of America Is The Story Of Progress'

President Obama pauses while speaking at the LBJ Presidential Library, on Thursday in Austin, Texas.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 11:34 am

Things have changed.

That was the message delivered during a ceremony commemorating the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Civil Rights Act on Wednesday.

Rep. John Lewis, a prominent figure in the civil rights struggle, said there is probably no greater symbol of that change than the fact that he was introducing Barack Obama, the country's first black president.

Obama took the stage at the Lyndon Johnson Presidential Library in Austin, Texas, to great applause. Then, he went on to deliver a nuanced study of Johnson and the power of the presidency.

Read more
NPR Story
11:34 am
Thu April 10, 2014

Is Twitter Becoming The New Instagram?

If a picture's worth 1,000 words, perhaps it's no surprise that Twitter is looking more like Instagram. (Marco Colin/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 1:00 pm

It’s said that a picture’s worth 1,000 words — considerably more than the 140 characters allowed in a tweet. So perhaps it’s no surprise that Twitter is starting to look more like Instagram, with more users including photos in their tweets.

Alexander Howard, who has written extensively about social media and collaborative technology, joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the increasing similarities between the two social networks.

Read more
NPR Story
11:34 am
Thu April 10, 2014

Congress Reviews Still-Secret Report On Marathon Bombing Intel Failures

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 1:00 pm

Did Russia not share enough intelligence with the Federal Bureau of Investigation about the elder Boston Marathon bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev, or did the FBI fail to connect the dots with information they’d been given about him by the Russians before the bombing?

Read more
NPR Story
11:34 am
Thu April 10, 2014

Greece Returns To World Markets For First Time In Five Years

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 1:00 pm

Greece’s finance ministry says its first return to the markets in four years has seen strong demand, with the country raising $4 billion through five-year bonds at a coupon rate of 4.75 percent.

Today’s bond sale is Greece’s first since 2010, when it became locked out of the international debt market by excessively high interest rates due to a severe financial crisis. It has been relying on international bailout funds ever since.

Read more
Spinal Cord Regeneration
11:33 am
Thu April 10, 2014

Even A Very Weak Signal From The Brain Might Help Paraplegics

Kent Stephenson, a research participant at the University of Louisville's Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, has his level of muscle activity and force measured by Katelyn Gurley.
Courtesy of the University of Louisville

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 3:47 am

A report that four young men who are paralyzed below the waist were able to move toes, ankles or knees when their lower spine was electrically stimulated was hailed as a breakthrough.

Read more
NPR Story
11:32 am
Thu April 10, 2014

In Libya, Accused Gaddafi Loyalists Still Can't Return Home

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 9:29 am

Three years after the revolt that toppled Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, some people are still internally displaced in the country. That includes men from the western town of Tawergha, who were accused of siding with Gaddafi’s forces by their neighbors in the city of Misurata.

After Gaddafi was killed, Tawergha was attacked. Thousands were forced from their homes and many of the men were jailed. Two years later, Tawerghans across Libya are living in refugee camps and still can’t return home.

The BBC’s Rana Jawad reports.

Read more

Pages