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The Salt
12:49 pm
Thu January 2, 2014

Cork Versus Screw Cap: Don't Judge A Wine By How It's Sealed

Winemakers are increasingly turning to screw caps. Now consumers are learning to get over their prejudice for cork, too.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 3:18 pm

Step aside, cork.

If you're a wine drinker, you've probably noticed that screw caps are no longer considered the closure just for cheap vino. Increasingly, bottles of very good wines are unscrewed, rather than uncorked.

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NPR Story
11:56 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Antarctic Explorer's Failure Becomes His Greatest Success

Recently recovered cellulose photos recovered by the New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust. Pictured, Iceberg and land, Ross Island. (New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust)

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 2:14 pm

A helicopter has rescued all 52 passengers from a research ship that’s been trapped in Antarctic ice since Christmas Eve.

The group was stuck in the ice for 10 days, but imagine being stuck there for 15 months – with no communication with the outside world.

That’s what happened to Irish explorer Ernest Shackleton and his team in their attempt to make a land crossing of Antarctica in 1914.

Their ship got stuck in the ice, and they never reached their goal. But that journey is now remembered for Shackleton’s journey to rescue his crew.

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NPR Story
11:55 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Bringing Back Detroit's 'Jit' Dance

The Jit is a street dance that was developed in Detroit during the 1970s. Haleem Rasul is the founder of HardCore Detroit, a dance troupe, and is keeping the dance's legacy alive in a new documentary. (Courtesy Haleem Rasul)

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 5:01 pm

Detroit is known for its auto industry, Motown music and now bankruptcy and vacant buildings — but a group of young dancers wants the city’s legacy also to include a street dance, known as the “Jit” (not to be confused with the swing dance called the jitterbug from the 1930s).

Three brothers started the dance in Detroit in the 1970s, they became known as the “Jitterbugs,” doing flips and kicks alongside each other in coordinated routines.

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NPR Story
11:55 am
Thu January 2, 2014

European Union Eases Work Restrictions

People prepare to board a bus to London via Germany and France on January 2, 2014 at the central bus station in Sofia. Romanians and Bulgarians have the right to work in any of the European Union's 28 countries, but 'no major increase' in emigration is expected, the European Commission has said. (Nikolay Doychinov/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue January 14, 2014 2:14 pm

Citizens of Romania and Bulgaria can now work without restrictions across the European Union.

The two countries are the poorest in the EU and their citizens’ rights to work and claim benefits were limited for the first seven years of their EU membership.

Some in the wealthier countries fear that because those restrictions have been eased, there may be mass migration from Romania and Bulgaria into wealthier member nations.

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Music Reviews
11:51 am
Thu January 2, 2014

When Memphis Made A Move On Nashville's Country Monopoly

Label for Warren Smith's "Ubangi Stomp" on Sun Records.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 2:31 pm

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All Tech Considered
11:51 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Netflix Built Its Microgenres By Staring Into The American Soul

While counting Netflix's microgenres, Madrigal discovered the streaming service's favorite adjective: romantic. It appears in 5,272 categories.
Robert Sullivan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 7, 2014 7:17 pm

In the old days, a movie genre was a simple, communal category: Action/Adventure, Comedy, Drama. One had to locate oneself in the Drama aisle at the video store and then look for just the right thing: A dark road trip movie with a strong female lead? Aha, Thelma & Louise.

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Low Birthrates
11:43 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Portugal's Baby Bust Is A Stark Sign Of Hard Times

Nurse Carina Araujo gives care to a child in the neonatal intensive care unit at Maternidade Doutor Alfredo da Costa Hospital in Lisbon, Portugal, on June 6. Portugal's birthrate has dropped 14 percent since the economic crisis hit.
The Washington Post The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 2:11 pm

In Lisbon, the waiting area of Portugal's biggest maternity hospital is empty. You can hear the hum of soda machines across the hall. There's just one expectant father, pacing the room.

Mario Carvalho, 40, has a toddler son and now awaits the birth of his baby girl.

"Today, I hope!" he says with a nervous smile.

The birth of a new baby is a joyous occasion. But in Portugal, it's an increasingly rare one. Since the economic crisis hit, the country's birthrate has dropped 14 percent, to less than 1.3 babies per woman — one of the lowest in the world.

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Shots - Health News
11:31 am
Thu January 2, 2014

How Language Seems To Shape One's View Of The World

"It's on the left," he says. "No, it's southeast of here," she says.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 5:05 am

Lera Boroditsky once did a simple experiment: She asked people to close their eyes and point southeast. A room of distinguished professors in the U.S. pointed in almost every possible direction, whereas 5-year-old Australian aboriginal girls always got it right.

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The Two-Way
11:26 am
Thu January 2, 2014

California High Court OKs Law License For Undocumented Immigrant

Sergio Garcia speaks at The Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles news conference in LA in August.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Fri January 3, 2014 10:44 am

California's Supreme Court ruled Thursday that an undocumented immigrant from Mexico should receive a license to practice law in accordance with a new state law.

The ruling in favor of Sergio Garcia, 36, comes after California lawmakers passed a bill in October authorizing qualified applicants into the state bar, regardless of their immigration status. Garcia's case was widely seen as a test of the viability of the new law.

The Associated Press says:

"The decision means Garcia can begin practicing law despite his immigration status.

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EarthFix Reports
11:21 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Conservation Group Turns Christmas Trees Into Salmon Habitat

When submerged in a coastal stream, an old Christmas tree offers young salmon protection from predators and new potential food sources.
Courtesy of Tualatin Valley Trout Unlimited

Originally published on Fri December 27, 2013 4:43 pm

Before you kick your dying Christmas tree to the curb, consider this: Members of the conservation group Trout Unlimited would love to turn that tree into fish habitat.

On three Saturdays in January, the Tualatin Valley chapter of Trout Unlimited will be collecting Christmas tree donations at two locations in the Portland metropolitan area. Later, they'll place the trees into a side channel of the Necanicum River near Seaside, where they will provide predator protection and food sources for baby coho salmon.

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The Two-Way
10:36 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Best Video Of The Day? MIT's 3-D Remote 'Touching' Device

The man on the screen isn't really there. But the flashlight he's moving around is.
Tangible.Media.MIT.edu

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 10:54 am

It's tempting to say this is the coolest video we've seen so far this year, but a joke like that might make it sound like we're not serious.

Really, there is something about this that strikes as amazing.

The Tangible Media Group at the MIT Media Lab calls its invention a "tangible user interface."

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Author Interviews
10:14 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Visible And Invisible: 'Servants' Looks At Life Downstairs

Early 20th century British maids worked long, hard days with little time off.
Topical Press Agency Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 2:28 pm

Many Americans were introduced to the world of early 20th century British servants through the PBS series Downton Abbey, which premieres its fourth season Sunday. The show is set in an era when domestic service was the largest single occupation in Great Britain.

"In 1900, it was calculated to comprise a third of all women who were in the workforce," writer Lucy Lethbridge tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies.

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The Two-Way
9:47 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Alleged Hackers Explain Reasons For Posting Snapchat Data

The logo and a page of mobile app "Snapchat" are displayed on tablets. Hackers broke into Snapchat, the popular mobile app, accessing the phone numbers and usernames of 4.6 million users and publishing them online.
Lionel Bonaventure AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 11:56 am

After millions of Snapchat usernames and other data were posted online, a group is saying it revealed the partial phone numbers and other information because the social-sharing service didn't do enough to increase its security. The popular service allows users to send images that vanish 10 seconds after they're seen.

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Oil Equipment
9:46 am
Thu January 2, 2014

New Year Likely To Bring More 'Megaload' Fights

Members of the Nez Perce Tribe in Idaho block the passage of a “megaload” being shipped by Omega Morgan in August.
Jessica Robinson Northwest News Network

Originally published on Tue December 31, 2013 4:45 pm

Two large pieces of oil equipment crossing the Northwest are expected to start moving again after the New Year's holiday.

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Parallels
9:46 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Expected Flow Of Bulgarians, Romanians Raises Hackles In Europe

Keith Vaz, a British member of Parliament and chairman of the home affairs select committee (left), greets arrivals at Luton Airport, including Victor Spirescu (right) on Wednesday. The first Romanians and Bulgarians with unrestricted access to the U.K. labor market have begun to arrive despite last-ditch efforts to prevent a feared wave of fresh immigration.
Jennifer Cockerell PA Photos/Landov

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 11:53 am

Over the New Year's holiday, Bulgarians and Romanians became free to move across the European Union in search of jobs as the bloc's last labor restrictions were lifted. As we've previously told you, the prospect of a flood of workers from two of the EU's newest and poorest members has prompted fears of "poverty migrants" — especially in Britain and Germany.

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