NPR News

Pages

Nutrition
12:22 am
Tue April 15, 2014

Where's The Whole Grain In Most Of Our Wheat Bread?

The most healthful loaves of bread contain chunks of grain still intact, like the seeded loaf on the right. Whole wheat loaves, like the one in the middle, may contain few whole grains and may be made up mostly of refined flour, like the white bread on the left.
Meg Vogel NPR

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 10:04 am

We've all heard the advice to eat more whole grains, and cut back on refined starches.

And there's good reason. Compared with a diet heavy on refined grains, like white flour, a diet rich in whole grains — which includes everything from brown rice to steel-cut oats to farro — is linked to lower rates of heart disease, certain cancers and Type 2 diabetes.

Read more
Asia
12:22 am
Tue April 15, 2014

After 25 Years Of Amnesia, Remembering A Forgotten Tiananmen

After People's Armed Police were deployed to clear the square on June 4, pitched battles broke out between police and angry crowds throwing stones.
Courtesy photo

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 2:38 pm

Twenty-five years ago, on April 15, 1989, Chinese students were mourning the death of a reformist leader. But what began as mourning evolved into mass protests demanding democracy. Demonstrators remained in Beijing's Tiananmen Square, day after day, until their protests were brutally suppressed by the Chinese army — on June 4. Hundreds died; to this day, no one knows how many.

Read more
The Changing Lives Of Women
12:21 am
Tue April 15, 2014

Social Security Chief: Women Live Longer, So They Should Save Early

Acting Social Security Commissioner Carolyn Colvin at a news conference last year. She says women need to start saving for retirement early in their careers.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 7:17 am

The Social Security Administration distributes retirement benefits to nearly 60 million Americans. And of those beneficiaries, nearly 60 percent are women.

Read more
NPR Story
4:03 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Marathon Bombing Survivor Loses Limbs But Finds New Life

Boston Marathon bombing survivor Jeff Bauman and his fiancée, Erin Hurley, are expecting their first child. (Jesse Costa/Here & Now)

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 6:01 am

Last April 15th, Jeff Bauman was just a regular guy from Chelmsford, Massachusetts. He had never been to the Boston Marathon before but his girlfriend Erin was running so he went to cheer her on. He was near the finish line that afternoon.

Bauman locked eyes with the man we now know as Tamerlan Tsarnaev, the bombing suspect who was later killed in a shootout with police. He also saw Tsarnaev’s backpack on the ground. A few minutes later, the bomb in that backpack blew up. Bauman lost his legs.

Read more
NPR Story
4:03 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Lessons For News Media After Marathon Bombings

One memorable moment in the coverage of the Boston Marathon bombing was an erroneous report by CNN and others, two days after the bombing, that an arrest had been made. (Screenshot from CNN)

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 2:30 pm

What did news media get wrong while covering the Boston Marathon and what lessons does that crisis offer for future live breaking news coverage?

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson discusses those questions with Deborah Becker, senior correspondent and host at WBUR, and Scott Helman, reporter and editor at the Boston Globe.

Interview Highlights

On how to know what information to trust in a breaking news situation

Scott Helman:

Read more
Monkey See
4:03 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

The Bitter Tundra Returns As 'Fargo' Comes To Television

Martin Freeman as Lester Nygaard in FX's Fargo.
Matthias Clamer FX

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 12:12 pm

There are a lot of ways to adapt a film to a TV show, and it's not as common as it was for a while there. For a while, you had strange experiments like TV telling the story of Ferris Bueller, TV telling the story of Baby and Johnny from Dirty Dancing, and TV revisiting 9 to 5. Usually, it meant just moving the characters over to a series, having them played by new actors, and following new stories about them. (Melora Hardin as Baby Houseman!) Every now and then, it worked: you might have heard of M*A*S*H.

Read more
All Tech Considered
4:03 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

A Video Game Meant To Take Us Back To The Physical World

People gather to play Ingress in Austin, Texas. The video game has been downloaded 2 million times and is popular in the U.S. and Europe.
Niantic Labs

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 11:38 am

Mobile phones and computer screens can distract us from engagement in the real world and that's been especially true of video games. But, there's an innovative game being played around the globe that's designed to use the same technologies to get its players more engaged with each other and the physical world.

Read more
NPR Story
4:03 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Steinbeck's 'The Grapes Of Wrath' Marks 75th Anniversary

U.S. novelist John Steinbeck (1902 - 1968) is pictured in January 1930. "The Grapes of Wrath" was published April 14, 1939. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 10:41 am

John Steinbeck’s “The Grapes Of Wrath” was published 75 years ago this month. The epic work tells the story of Oklahoma farmers migrating to California after the dust bowl of the 1930s.

It won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. To mark the anniversary, there’s a beautiful new special edition of the book, published with the original cover painting and the original notes on the book flap.

Read more
Theater
4:03 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Conflicting Tales Of A School Shooting In 'The Library'

In the new play The Library, Chloë Grace Moretz is a teen who survives a school shooting, only to discover she's been accused of aiding the shooter.
Joan Marcus

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 3:42 pm

The Library, a new play at New York's Public Theater, tackles an uncomfortable contemporary topic head on: It looks at the aftermath of a school shooting and peers into the shattered lives of the survivors, and the stories they tell. The play is written by Scott Z. Burns and directed by Steven Soderbergh, who've collaborated on three films; most recently, the thriller, Side Effects.

Read more
The Record
3:24 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Reunited And It Feels A Little Awkward: OutKast At Coachella

Big Boi (left) and Andre 3000 perform on stage at Coachella during the first stop on OutKast's reunion tour.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 3:42 pm

Read more
The Two-Way
3:22 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Ooops! US Airways Accidentally Includes Lewd Photo In Tweet

The Twitter account for US Airways created an embarrassing incident for the airline Monday, after an inappropriate image was included in a tweet to a customer.
Twitter

Airlines commonly use Twitter to address the concerns of customers, answering questions about flights and policies and helping passengers deal with delays. But US Airways ran into trouble online Monday, when its response to an unhappy customer included a link to a graphic photo of a woman with a model airplane.

The company has apologized and deleted the tweet from its account.

Read more
Parallels
3:03 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Ukrainian Jews Celebrate Passover In Uncertain Times

Many Jews protested in Kiev's Independence Square and see a thread connecting ancient Egypt to modern-day Ukraine. "We started our liberation 3,000 years ago, and we still are in the process," says Rabbi Alexander Duchovny.
Peter Klaunzer EPA/Landov

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 5:02 pm

At Passover celebrations around the world tonight, the youngest child will sing a song in Hebrew. "Why," the youngster will ask, "is this night different from all other nights?"

Adults in Ukraine can ask a similar question this year: What makes this Passover different from all others? It's a question Rabbi Alexander Duchovny has been thinking about a lot. "Passover is z'man cheruteinu, time of our liberty — time of freedom," he says. "And especially for Ukrainian Jewry, and for Ukrainians, this is a time of liberty."

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:00 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Gene Linked To Alzheimer's Poses A Special Threat To Women

Women make up nearly two-thirds of the people in the U.S. diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 4:35 pm

A gene associated with Alzheimer's disease appears especially dangerous to women and may be one reason that more women than men are diagnosed with the disease.

Read more
NPR Story
2:30 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

How To Start Conversations With Total Strangers

Rob Baedeker and Chris Colin are the authors of "What to Talk About: On a Plane, at a Cocktail Party, in a Tiny Elevator with Your Boss's Boss." (Ilana Diamond)

Have you ever gone up to an intriguing looking person at a party, tried to start a conversation and froze? Or perhaps you just babbled mundanely about the weather? Well, authors Chris Colin and Rob Baedeker can help.

Along with illustrator Tony Millionaire, they’ve published “What to Talk About: On a Plane, at a Cocktail Party, in a Tiny Elevator with Your Boss’s Boss” (excerpt below).

Read more
NPR Story
2:30 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

'Blood Moon' Begins Series Of Lunar Eclipses

Path of the Moon through Earth's umbral and penumbral shadows during the Total Lunar Eclipse of April 15, 2014. (Fred Espenak via NASA.gov)

Stargazers are in for a treat if they’re willing to stay up late tonight. A rare lunar eclipse known as a blood-moon will begin tomorrow morning at about 2 a.m. Eastern time. The full eclipse will last from about 3 a.m. to 4:30 a.m.

Kelly Beatty, senior contributing editor for Sky & Telescope magazine joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to explain the phenomenon, which is part of a “tetrad,” and the best time to watch.

Read more

Pages