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Shots - Health News
7:46 am
Thu May 1, 2014

New Virus Related To Smallpox Is Found In Republic Of Georgia

Disease detective Neil Vora of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention looks for the new smallpox-like virus in Georgian cattle.
Darin Caroll CDC

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 1:24 pm

Two herdsmen in the country of Georgia have been infected with a brand-new virus, scientists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday.

The newly identified virus is a second cousin to smallpox. And, like smallpox, it causes painful blisters on the hands and arms‎. Other symptoms include a fever, swollen lymph nodes and overall weakness, CDC scientists reported at a meeting in Atlanta.

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The Two-Way
7:25 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Rosie The Riveter's World War II-Era Plant Saved

A campaign to save the Willow Run Bomber Plant in Ypsilanti Township, Mich., appears to have succeeded. The factory is where Rosie the Riveter and thousands of other women built B-24 bombers during World War II.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 8:38 am

In the end, it was a riveting finish: A campaign to save part of the Michigan factory where Rosie the Riveter and thousands of other women built B-24 bombers during World War II has raised the money needed to turn it into a museum.

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The Two-Way
6:40 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Ukraine To Expel Russian Diplomat Reportedly Caught Taking Classified Info

Communist Party supporters carry red flags during their rally to mark International Labor Day in downtown Kharkiv, Ukraine, on Thursday. In recent weeks, pro-Russia separatists have seized key installations in several cities in eastern Ukraine.
Volodymyr Petrov EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri May 2, 2014 4:08 am

Ukraine's government has ordered the expulsion of Russia's military attache, saying he had been caught red-handed receiving classified documents related to the country's cooperation with NATO.

The unnamed attache was taken into custody on Wednesday, has been declared persona non grata and will be thrown out of Ukraine, officials say.

"On April 30, he was caught red-handed receiving classified material from his source," said Maryna Ostapenko, a spokeswoman for Ukraine's security service, the SBU.

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The Two-Way
6:02 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Sinn Fein Leader Questioned In 40-Year-Old Murder Case

Sinn Fein President Gerry Adams is in custody and being questioned in connection with a 1972 kidnapping and murder.
Peter Morrison AP

Originally published on Fri May 2, 2014 11:05 am

The leader of Sinn Fein, Gerry Adams, was in custody for a second day in Northern Ireland as police questioned him in connection with an IRA kidnapping and murder that occurred more than 40 years ago.

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The Two-Way
4:43 am
Thu May 1, 2014

2 Feet Of Rain Causes Massive Flooding In Florida, Alabama

Michael Harrell of J&J Towing attaches a tow cable to a car that was swept off the road by torrential rains in Pensacola, Fla., on Wednesday.
GM Andrews AP

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 10:14 am

Extreme rainfall in much of the East and parts of the South is causing major problems, with Florida's Panhandle and southern Alabama — which got more than 2 feet of rain in 24 hours — bearing the brunt of the onslaught.

The torrential rains followed close on the heels of a rash of deadly tornadoes that battered a broad swath of the country earlier this week, killing dozens of people.

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Asia
4:35 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Beijing Bans Outdoor Grills

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Grilling season is coming up, but not in smoggy Beijing. The city has banned smoky outdoor grills in a fight against its notorious pollution. Beijing's popular kebab vendors will be forced to move inside. Critics there say it's a smokescreen to distract from coal mines and cars turning out far more pollution.

One Chinese official was scorned last fall for saying stir fry was a significant source of pollution. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
4:35 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Hoppertunity To Run In Kentucky Derby

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

The Kentucky Derby comes Saturday, and the announcer almost had a problem. Trainer Bob Baffert could have had a nameless horse. He hated the horse's name, Anyway U Way. You can't run a nameless horse in the Derby. Just imagine that announcer: And down the stretch they come, in the lead is - luckily, the trainer knew the Hoppers, a couple trying to have a baby. To encourage them, he named the horse Hoppertunity.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
3:27 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Explosion At Florida Jail Kills 2, Injures Dozens Of Inmates

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 1:10 pm

An apparent gas explosion at a jail in Pensacola, Fla., has killed at least two inmates and injured more than 100 people, including some corrections officers, according to local reports. But it's not clear yet whether the incident at the Escambia County Jail has anything to do with the extensive flooding in the region.

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Movie Reviews
3:09 am
Thu May 1, 2014

'Ida': A Young Woman's Search For Identity In 1962 Poland

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 6:37 am

Ida is a Polish film about a young woman who was raised as an orphan in a convent. She's planning to take her vows as a nun when she discovers she's Jewish and her parents were killed by the Nazis.

Remembrances
3:09 am
Thu May 1, 2014

British Character Actor Bob Hoskins Dies At 71

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 4:35 am

Bob Hoskins died this week after being hospitalized with pneumonia. He starred in memorable films such as The Long Good Friday, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Mona Lisa and The Cotton Club. He was 71.

Economy
2:11 am
Thu May 1, 2014

China Could Pass U.S. As Top Economy This Year

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 10:46 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The United States economy has been the largest in the world since the days when Ulysses S. Grant was president. That was in the 1870s. But a new World Bank report says by one measure that could change by the end of this year: China would take over the top spot this year.

To explain what the new report means and what it doesn't, we turn to NPR's Frank Langfitt. He's on the line from Shanghai. Hi, Frank.

FRANK LANGFITT, BYLINE: Good morning, Steve.

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NPR Story
2:11 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Kerry Turns His Attention To South Sudan's Civil War

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 4:35 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. This week Secretary of State John Kerry turns his attention, as much as circumstances allow, from the crisis in Ukraine and Mideast peace talks to the civil war in South Sudan. South Sudan broke away from Sudan barely three years ago and now that new nation is being torn apart in a fight for power between the president and former vice president.

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Around the Nation
2:11 am
Thu May 1, 2014

D.C. Metro Combats Sexual Harassment, Urges Riders To Speak Up

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 6:37 am

Sexual harassment is a chronic problem for transit systems, and it's consistently underreported. Metro transit officials have kicked off a serious effort to fight harassment on buses and trains.

Paying For College
12:40 am
Thu May 1, 2014

Is It Still College Without Football?

ImageZoo/Corbis

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 6:02 am

A small number of universities are starting to go against the grain, reducing amenities and frills in favor of keeping the costs relatively low.

Neil Theobald is the president of Temple University, which recently began offering students $4,000 per year in grants — if they promise to limit the number of hours they work during the school year and graduate on time.

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The Two-Way
4:44 pm
Wed April 30, 2014

FAA Slowly Lifting Ground Stop In West After Technical Problem

Flights were grounded for more than an hour in some of the nation's Western states because of a technical problem.

The AP reports:

"In addition, the Federal Aviation Administration said Wednesday its air traffic control facility had also temporarily stopped accepting additional flights into the airspace.

"The agency says some flights were diverted as it gradually restores the system.

"Officials at Burbank airport said some flights were again being allowed to take off."

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