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The Salt
11:45 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Sandwich Monday: The Poutine Burger

Putting Canada on top of America is both delicious and geographically accurate.
NPR

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 12:35 pm

Poutine, if you don't know, is a Canadian dish made up of French fries topped with cheese curds and gravy. And if you don't know, you really haven't been living your life to its fullest. Seriously, what have you been doing? Go get some poutine. Then come back and read about this poutine burger — an open-face hamburger topped with poutine — we ate from Spritzburger in Chicago. We'll wait. We have to. We can't move.

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Theater
11:42 am
Mon April 28, 2014

For Alan Cumming, Life Is (Once Again) A Cabaret

This is the third time Alan Cumming has starred in Cabaret. Each of the productions with Cumming was directed by Sam Mendes. Rob Marshall choreographed both American productions and co-directed the new one.
Andrew H. Walker Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 3:20 pm

Alan Cumming has starred in the musical Cabaret three times — a 1993 London production, a Tony-winning 1998 Broadway revival, and a new Broadway revival — and it hasn't gotten old. "It's so energetic, and it just takes up every single element of being an actor," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

Cumming plays the master of ceremonies in a debaucherous Berlin nightclub called the Kit Kat Klub. The role was originated by Joel Grey, who starred in the original 1966 Broadway production as well as the 1972 movie.

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The Two-Way
11:25 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Red Tape Ensnares Pakistani Baby Born In India

No love lost: Indian and Pakistani border guards.
K.M. Chaudary AP

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 12:49 pm

A 2-week-old boy born to a Pakistani couple visiting India is being denied permission to return home with his parents because he lacks the proper travel documentation.

The story begins with Mai Fatima, her husband, Mir Muhammad Mahar, and their two children. The couple, from Ghotki, Pakistan, were expecting a third child when they went to Basanpir, India, 2 1/2 months ago to visit Mai Fatima's father.

But her father died during their visit; she subsequently gave birth to a boy on April 14.

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Parallels
11:16 am
Mon April 28, 2014

How To Survive In Iraqi Politics

Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki is seeking another four years in power. The country votes Wednesday amid increased violence between the security forces and opposition groups.
Sabah Arar AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 1:21 pm

Low to the dusty ground, by a reed-fringed river and a lush date palm orchard, is the farmhouse where Iraq's prime minister, Nouri al-Maliki, grew up.

The place is Junaja, one of hundreds of poor, Shiite Muslim farming towns in southern Iraq. Donkey carts jog alongside battered buses. No monument, no ostentation honors Maliki. The only new thing in town is the mosque.

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Gastroenterology
10:43 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Got Gas? It Could Mean You've Got Healthy Gut Microbes

Sulfur-rich foods, such as cabbage, bok choy and kale, can be popular with gut bacteria. And we all know how much the critters enjoy beans.
Meg Vogel/NPR

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 9:02 am

Not long ago, we heard about a catchy idea for a cookbook: "Fart-free food for everybody."

In theory, these recipes would be helpful for some people — and those in their vicinity.

But being a bit gassy may actually be a small price to pay for a lot of benefits to our health.

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The Two-Way
10:20 am
Mon April 28, 2014

North Korea Issues Sexist Tirade Against South Korean Leader

North Korea apparently doesn't like either of them: President Obama and South Korean President Park Geun-hye at a news conference in Seoul, South Korea, on Friday.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 4:21 am

North Korea isn't exactly known for its light touch: It has referred to its foes as a "rat-like group of bastards," a "shameless political dwarf" and even a "swish of skirt."

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NPR Story
10:16 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Historian: Blaming Sterling Controversy On Age Is 'Too Easy'

Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling, right, and V. Stiviano, left, watch the Clippers play the Sacramento Kings during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles, Oct. 25, 2013. (Mark J. Terrill/AP)

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 1:33 pm

Racist comments allegedly spoken by Clippers’ owner Donald Sterling have drawn wide criticism, including from President Obama and from celebrated basketball players including LeBron James, Michael Jordan and Magic Johnson.

Portions of the recording were released over the weekend by TMZ and Deadspin.

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NPR Story
10:16 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Supreme Court Takes On Cell Phones And Privacy

A pedestrian uses a smartphone as he walks along Market Street on June 5, 2013 in San Francisco, California. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 11:47 am

Two Supreme Court cases about police searches of cellphones without warrants are presenting vastly different views of the device. Is it a critical tool for criminals, or is it someone’s virtual home?

How the justices answer that question could determine the outcome of the cases being argued Tuesday. The Obama administration and California defend the searches.

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NPR Story
10:16 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Obama Praises Security Deal With Philippines

U.S. President Barack Obama attends a joint press conference with Philippine President Benigno Aquino at the presidential palace on April 28, 2014 in Manila, Philippines. (Malacanang Photo Bureau via Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 1:47 pm

President Barack Obama says a 10-year agreement signed today to give the U.S. military greater access to Philippine bases will help promote peace and stability in the region. He also said he hopes China’s dominant power will allow its neighbors to prosper on their own terms.

The Enhanced Defense Cooperation Agreement signed as Obama arrived in the Philippines will give American forces temporary access to selected military camps and allow them to preposition fighter jets and ships.

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My Big Break
9:45 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Without Life-Saving Pact, This Doctor Would Have Been The Patient

Dr. Sampson Davis is an emergency medicine physician in Newark, N.J. When he was 17, he committed a robbery that led to his big break. He's written about his return to the hospital where he was born in his memoir, Living and Dying in Brick City.
Rainer Hosch Courtesy of Sampson Davis

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 3:23 pm

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Dr. Sampson Davis is an emergency medicine physician in his hometown of Newark, N.J. He grew up in a rough neighborhood. As a kid, he excelled in school but didn't always stay out of trouble.

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Language
9:45 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Segregated From Its History, How 'Ghetto' Lost Its Meaning

The pushcart market in the East Side Ghetto of New York's Jewish Quarter was a hive of activity in the early 1900s.
Ewing Galloway Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 29, 2014 2:32 pm

As you might have gathered from our blog's title, the Code Switch team is kind of obsessed with the ways we speak to each other. Each week in "Word Watch," we'll dig into language that tells us something about the way race is lived in America today. (Interested in contributing? Holler at this form.)

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Video Game Culture
9:45 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Gaming While Male: A 'Privilege' Few Men Recognize

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 7:08 am

In video games, sexism often comes in the form of male-dominated storylines and character archetypes. In the video game community, it takes a more menacing shape.

It ranges from attempts to silence female critics to the harassment of fellow players. Some harassment even goes so far as phone calls and rape threats, as one female game developer found out last year.

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The Two-Way
9:44 am
Mon April 28, 2014

Utah Mom Accused Of Killing 6 Of Her Babies Charged With Murder

Megan Huntsman, accused of killing six of her babies and storing their bodies in her garage, appears in court on Monday in Provo, Utah. Prosecutors have filed six first-degree murder charges against her.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 1:35 pm

A Utah woman accused of killing six babies during the course of a decade shortly after giving birth to them has been charged with six counts of first-degree murder.

Megan Huntsman, 39, was being held on $6 million bail. She is accused of killing the children between 1996 and 2006, and keeping their bodies in boxes in the garage. The Daily Herald in Provo, Utah, reports:

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Code Switch
9:44 am
Mon April 28, 2014

For Donald Sterling, A Spotty Reputation Further Tarnished

Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling and V. Stiviano watch the Clippers play the Los Angeles Lakers during a 2010 NBA preseason game.
Danny Moloshok AP

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 2:36 pm

If you're a basketball nut, last week was heaven. Nearly all of the series in the first round of the NBA playoffs have been intense affairs with dramatic finishes. Several teams that barely squeaked into the postseason might upset some of the league's powerhouses. It was an uncommonly exciting week of hoops.

Then Donald Sterling happened.

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Student Privacy
9:44 am
Mon April 28, 2014

What Parents Need To Know About Big Data And Student Privacy

iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 8:53 am

My first brush with professional journalism — and with violations of student privacy — came when I was a sophomore at Yale. It was 1999, and George W. Bush, a Yale alumnus, was running for president.

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