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When you listen to a program like Morning Edition, it sounds pretty seamless doesn't it? The national hosts and stories are intertwined with regional hosts, like me, along with news and interviews. The flow is orchestrated by producers and one very important person: the audio engineer, or "board op."

One of the finest board ops I've ever worked with died recently. She didn't want a funeral or a written obituary, but we decided she deserved to be part of our parting thoughts series.

Fleetwood Mac made "Rumours" amidst rifts

Jun 23, 2017

Today's Morning Edition music is from "Dreams" by Fleetwood Mac which was number one on the Billboard pop chart 40 years ago today.

This was the band's only number one hit in the U.S. While they were recording it and the other songs on the "Rumours" album, everyone in the band was going through a break up.

The Minnesota Timberwolves made a big trade during the NBA draft last night.

They sent Zach Levine and Kris Dunn to the Chicago Bulls for All Star guard Jimmy Butler. The Wolves and Bulls also swapped draft picks.

MPR's Cathy Wurzer spoke with Howard Sinker, a digital sports editor for the Star Tribune about whether the trade makes the Wolves a better team.

To listen to their conversation, click the audio player above.

Police have charged Darren Osborne with terrorism-related murder and attempted murder over an attack in which investigators say Osborne drove a van into a crowd of people leaving a mosque in north London early Monday.

Updated 12:30 p.m. ET

President Trump kept one of his campaign promises, signing a bill Friday to make it easier for the secretary of veterans affairs to fire and discipline employees. It came in response to the 2014 VA scandal in which employees covered up long wait times while collecting bonuses.

The bill, which passed earlier this month with strong bipartisan support, also gives the secretary authority to revoke bonuses and protects whistleblowers who report wrongdoing.

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Truth And Lies.

About Deborah Lipstadt's TED Talk

After publishing the book Denying the Holocaust, Deborah Lipstadt was sued for libel in the UK by Holocaust denier David Irving. Rather than ignore the case, she chose to fight it — and won.

About Deborah Lipstadt

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Truth And Lies.

About Michael Specter's TED Talk

Michael Specter explores why some deny scientific evidence — such as the safety of vaccines and GMOs, or climate change. He says denying can provide a sense of control in an unsure world.

About Michael Specter

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Truth And Lies.

About Carrie Poppy's TED Talk

After visiting a bookstore, Carrie Poppy started feeling odd: pressure on her chest and auditory hallucinations. She thought it was a spirit – until she found another explanation for her symptoms.

About Carrie Poppy

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Truth And Lies.

About Stephanie Busari's TED Talk

Stephanie Busari discusses the flip-side of fake news: denying real news. She recounts the kidnapping of Nigeria's Chibok schoolgirls and how some Nigerians believed the news was a government hoax.

About Stephanie Busari

Stephanie Busari is CNN's digital and multimedia bureau head in Nigeria.

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Truth And Lies.

About Laura Galante's TED Talk

What makes us susceptible to fake news? Laura Galante says its our ability to choose what information to believe - something foreign governments can use for their own benefit.

About Laura Galante

A cool spell hits Minnesota

Jun 23, 2017

MPR's Cathy Wurzer spoke with University of Minnesota Climatologist Mark Seeley about cooler-than-normal temperatures across Minnesota this week.

He answers a question about the lowest temperature ever recorded in Minnesota in the month of June. And he has a cool forecast for this weekend.

To listen to their conversation, click the audio player above.

MPR's Cathy Wurzer spoke with University of Minnesota Climatologist Mark Seeley about cooler-than-normal temperatures across Minnesota this week.

The Austin City Council has approved some changes to the review process for the city’s new land development code, known as CodeNEXT, allowing for additional scrutiny at City Hall before its planned adoption in April of next year.

The fire that devastated a 24-story apartment building last week began by accident — and the source was a refrigerator, London police say. Investigators have also found that materials used on Grenfell Tower's exterior failed safety tests.

"We now have expert evidence that the fire was not started deliberately — the fire started in a fridge-freezer — the make and model is a Hotpoint FF175BP," Detective Superintendent Fiona McCormack said Friday. She added that the refrigerator, which has a freezer on the bottom and refrigerator on top, has not been recalled.

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Now that the bill is out, we are examining just how the Senate Republicans want to change the American health care system. Here's President Trump talking about that bill this morning on "Fox & Friends."

As Healthy Texas Women closes in on a one-year milestone, the state says the program has been steadily increasing access to health care for women. Advocates, however, are skeptical.

Walker faces new Native art controversy

Jun 23, 2017

Native American artists from around the country are criticizing a new show opening at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis.

"Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World" features work from the 40-year career of an internationally lauded American sculptor. He identifies as Cherokee. But his critics say he is not Native, and is hurting artists who are.

The exhibit fills several galleries at the Walker. Created by the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, the show is touring to four major cities. Vincenzo de Bellis, the Walker curator for the exhibit, says Durham is multifaceted.

It was the stuff of an Agatha Christie novel.

On June 27, 1977, the aged heiress to a vast mining fortune is killed along with her night nurse at Glensheen, a posh mansion perched on the Lake Superior coast. The mystery became a media sensation.

"Someone breaks into a 39-room mansion and killed the nurse on the grand stairway," with a candlestick, recalled Joe Kimball, a reporter with the Minneapolis Tribune who covered the murders. "Then went upstairs and smothered the 83-year-old heiress in her bed with a satin pillow."

In Atlanta, the buzzing of dirt bikes and ATVs is loudest on Sundays, when a loose group of riders called ATL Bike Life get together.

About 50 of them showed up outside a park in southwest Atlanta, popping wheelies and revving their engines.

Thirteen chefs divide into teams and begin to prepare appetizers, salads, mains and sides, and desserts. At their disposal are 300 pounds of "ugly" produce just rescued from local farms: purple cauliflower, cherries, shiitake mushrooms, pears, fingerling potatoes, shallots, kale and carrots.

Most of it looks super-fresh, though in some cases the produce is dinged or oddly colored enough to be unappealing to distributors.

Today we're going to update a story we first brought you back in 2004. That September, NPR set out to document what may be the most important day in any young child's life — the first day of kindergarten. For parents it's a day filled with hope, anxiety and one big question: Is our child ready?

The answer back then, as far as 5-year-old Sam Marsenison was concerned, was, "No, no, no!"

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Boys Skirt The No-Shorts Rule

Jun 23, 2017

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And NPR's Alison Kodjak, who covers health policy and is covering this legislation, is in our studios once again. Alison, what did you hear there that was significant?

Thirty years after Chinese Communist Party Chairman Mao Zedong labeled golf a sport for the bourgeois and banned it from his worker's paradise, his successor gave the sport another try.

In 1982, Vincent Chin was a 27-year-old draftsman at an engineering firm living in Detroit. On June 19, the Chinese-American immigrant went out with friends to celebrate his upcoming wedding.

That night at a bar he crossed paths with Ronald Ebens and Michael Nitz. The two worked in the auto industry and were angry about recent layoffs which were widely blamed on Japanese imports.

In ordinary times, New York-based Vornado Realty Trust would be a natural candidate to take on a major construction project such as the long-awaited rebuilding of FBI headquarters.

As with so much about the Trump era, however, the ordinary rules don't apply.

A commercial real estate firm, Vornado is widely reported to be a finalist to build a new campus for the FBI somewhere in the suburbs of Washington, D.C. But its financial ties to President Trump are raising concerns about conflicts of interest.

When the biggest soccer rivalry in the Northwest — maybe in all of Major League Soccer, some argue — reaches the 80th minute on Sunday, a song will grow from the Timbers Army in Providence Park.

The crowd will continue a 13-year home match tradition by singing "You Are My Sunshine" in the waning minutes of the match.

It's part love song for the team and part memory for Hannah, the daughter of a man named Jim Serrill.

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