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At A&M, Protests, Big Crowds and Tension Over White Nationalist's Speech

17 hours ago

From the Texas Tribune:

COLLEGE STATION — When white nationalist Richard Spencer took the stage at Texas A&M University on Tuesday, about two dozen of the 400 people in the room stood and applauded. Many others hissed.

After months of discussion, and more after-hours debate and testimony at City Hall the Austin City Council is moving forward with plans for a controversial development known as the Grove at Shoal Creek.

For 22 years, Reading Frenzy has been Chloe Eudaly’s business, her access point for writers, artists and activists, and her labor of love. But city code requires commissioners to divest their business interests.

Having defeated incumbent Commissioner Steve Novick in November, Eudaly wrote on her personal Facebook page she's decided to close the business, at least temporarily.

She wrote, “It really cannot stand on its own two feet without me and well, it can't have me anymore.”

President-elect Donald Trump continued his "Thank You" victory tour on Tuesday, making a stop in North Carolina to tout his national security agenda and formally introduce his pick for Defense Secretary, retired Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis.

Speaking in Fayetteville, N.C., Trump called Mattis the "living embodiment of the Marine Corps motto" — Semper Fidelis.

The sun was shining on opponents of the Dakota Access Pipeline on Sunday, when the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced that it would not approve the final and key part of the controversial project. Less than 24 hours later, many of those people were huddling in shelters or trying to escape the rural camp as a brutal winter storm bore down on them.

Cars slid off roads and tents were blown over as winds gusted to more than 50 mph, causing near white-out conditions on the short stretch of highway between the protesters' camp and the small town of Cannon Ball, N.D.

Alex Jones has a following. His radio show is carried on more than 160 stations, and he has more than 1.8 million subscribers on YouTube.

And he claims to have the ear of the next president of the United States.

Jones is also one of the nation's leading promoters of conspiracy theories — some of which take on lives of their own. He has been a chief propagator of untrue and wild claims about a satanic sex trafficking ring run by one of Hillary Clinton's top advisers out of a pizzeria in Washington, D.C.

At least two members of the Oregon Legislature want to repeal a 1987 statute that prevents police from enforcing federal immigration law.

Right now, law enforcement agencies can’t use their resources to apprehend immigrants if their only violation is being in the country illegally.

But a potential ballot measure would do away with the long-standing state statute.

“Law enforcement is prohibited from enforcing the law,” said Republican Rep. Mike Nearman of Independence.

Copyright 2016 Oregon Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit Oregon Public Broadcasting.

Copyright 2016 Oregon Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit Oregon Public Broadcasting.

Adrienne Truscott Tackles Rape Jokes With Stilletto Heels

21 hours ago
Copyright 2016 Oregon Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit Oregon Public Broadcasting.

Federal land managers are getting their scientific ducks in a row before updating the most important forest management plan in the Northwest.

The Northwest Forest Plan covers 24 million acres of public land run by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and Bureau of Land Management. It went into effect 22 years ago.

“Since that time, there’s been a wealth of new science, a tremendous focus on new issues,” says Tom Spies of USFS Pacific Northwest Research Station in Corvallis.

Ramsey County Sheriff Matt Bostrom announced Tuesday he's resigning for a position at Oxford University.

He says he'll be doing research to create an international community policing model based on Ramsey County.

• For Bostrom in his own words on the move, use the audio player above to hear his interview with All Things Considered host Tom Crann.

Hiring for character and training for competence has been the linchpin of his six years as sheriff, he said.

That model stemmed from conversations with community members, and he says it increases police trust.

In the quest to help the poor, it's difficult to know whose needs are the greatest. Without clear data, it's tough to know who to help first.

The traditional way to look for the poorest of the poor is with household surveys. That's the primary source of data for policy decisions, but it has drawbacks.

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Lou Rocha/PRI

Protesters at the Standing Rock Camp in North Dakota spent Sunday evening celebrating: The Army Corps of Engineers said it wouldn't give permission for the Dakota Access Pipeline to run under the Missouri River.

Celebrations were cut short, though, when a ferocious blizzard rolled into the area, with wind gusts up to 50 mph and wind chills near 20 below zero. The camp itself was buried in snow drifts as high as 7 feet.

Mohammad Sayed is unstoppable. At the age of 19, he is already an inventor and entrepreneur. One half of his business, called RimPower, is providing assistive technologies. The other half is a comic book series centered around the hero Wheelchair Man.

“My goal is to help people in wheelchair[s] both psychologically and physically,” he says. “A world where every wheelchair user is empowered rather than disabled."

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