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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit

As the host of the Peabody Award-winning series Parts Unknown, Anthony Bourdain has visited conflict zones like Beirut, Congo, Gaza and Libya — places his CNN colleagues routinely cover. But Bourdain is clear that he doesn't want to be mistaken for a journalist.

"I feel like the voice that's silenced in America is the black woman," says writer/director Zell Miller III about his new show Ballot Eats the Bullet. 

"The Vortex wanted me to create something that would be political around this time," Miller says. "And for me, being a black person in America is a political statement, and to be a black woman, to me, is the biggest political statement that you can make."

Paul VanDerWerf/<a href="">Flickr</a>&nbsp;CC by 2.0

I have spent most of my life in the United States living in small towns: Charlottesville, Virginia; Brockway, Pennsylvania; Gambier, Ohio; South Bend, Indiana; and Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Although beautiful, the cities where I have lived were not the most cosmopolitan. They didn’t have large communities of Indian immigrants, or immigrants in general.

U.S.-sponsored peace talks between Israelis and Palestinians broke down two years ago. But very quietly, the Palestinian government in the West Bank has been running its own initiative to reach out to Israelis.

Reporter Daniel Estrin has more from the Palestinian city of Ramallah.


Daniel Estrin, reporter. He tweets @DanielEstrin.

Sweet potatoes are a big part of many a holiday meal. But Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst says that you can do so much more with them.

She brings Here & Now‘s Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson sweet potato chips, a puree and a chocolate cake made with a recipe from her friend and cookbook author Raghavan Iyer.

Twitter has released its third quarter earnings and, along with them, announced the layoff of around 350 employees.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Curt Nickisch, senior editor at Harvard Business Review, about why Twitter is struggling and what might be next for the company.

Twitter shocked the Internet Thursday with a farewell to Vine: "In the coming months we'll be discontinuing the mobile app."

We could have seen it coming. The six-second looped-video site hasn't gotten much love from Twitter, which is grappling with self-reflection: another quarter of losses, layoffs of 9 percent of the staff, constant rumors of a potential sale.

A new report by the World Wildlife Fund warns that global wildlife populations are in steep decline worldwide.

It's been a brutal forest fire season in California. But there's actually a greater threat to California's trees — the state's record-setting drought. The lack of water has killed at least 60 million trees in the past four years.

Scientists are struggling to understand which trees are most vulnerable to drought and how to keep the survivors alive. To that end, they're sending human climbers and flying drones into the treetops, in a novel biological experiment.

From Texas Standard

After reports that Child Protective Services caseworkers have let thousands of children at risk for abuse and neglect slip through the system’s cracks, a select team of police will begin to search the state for them.

"It's the consumers' information. How it is used should be the consumers' choice." So said FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler as the commission adopted rules requiring Internet service providers such as Comcast and Verizon to get customers' permission before selling the data they collect to marketers.

The vote was 3-2 along party lines.