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9:53 am
Fri May 16, 2014

How Do You Count 500 Million Votes? A Look At India's Election

Indian election workers learn to use and check electronic voting machines on May 11.
Kevin Frayer Getty Images

Parliamentary elections in the world's largest democracy ended on Friday. The election took six weeks; more than 800 million citizens were eligible to vote.

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Krulwich Wonders...
9:25 am
Fri May 16, 2014

When Numbers Bleed, Freeze, Starve And Die On A Battlefield: The Dark Poetry Of Data

Roger Viollet Collection Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 1:43 pm

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Parallels
9:21 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Why The U.S. Shunned The Man Who Will Now Lead India

Narendra Modi, shown here at an April 5 campaign rally, was ostracized by the United States for more than a decade. As it became increasingly clear in recent months that he was likely to become India's next leader, the U.S. and European countries began reaching out to him.
Sam Panthaky AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 1:02 pm

Until a few months ago, the U.S. government was effectively boycotting Narendra Modi, the man who is virtually certain to be India's next prime minister following the landslide victory by his party in the country's parliamentary elections.

So will the U.S. now warm to Modi as the elected leader of the world's largest democracy?

Before answering that, let's look at why Washington refused to deal with him.

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Africa
9:11 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Wole Soyinka: I Just Want Those Monsters Exterminated

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 8:05 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. My thanks to Celeste Headlee for sitting in for me while I was away. And at the end of the program today, actually, I will have a word about her exciting new venture.

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Barbershop
9:11 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Is It Donald Sterling's Right To Fight For His Team?

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 8:05 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Education
9:11 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Does It Matter if Schools Are Racially Integrated?

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 8:05 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Let's turn now to a significant moment in the life of this nation. Tomorrow will mark 60 years since the day the Supreme Court issued its ruling in the landmark school desegregation case, Brown versus Board of Education. Advocates hoped the suit would level the playing field for all students, but it would take years of court orders, protests and, in some cases, the National Guard for some school districts to stop deliberate enforced segregation.

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Business
9:08 am
Fri May 16, 2014

GM To Pay Record Fine Over Safety Recall

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 10:00 am

The Department of Transportation on Friday announced that it's ordering General Motors to pay a $35 million civil penalty for the handling of its ignition switch problems.

NPR Story
9:07 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Male Soprano Soars In World's Smallest Vocal Category

Robert Crowe is a male soprano and PhD student in historical musicology, specializing in the history of the castrati. (Courtesy)

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 12:31 pm

Robert Crowe is a member of “the world’s smallest vocal category”: male sopranos. There are relatively few of them performing professionally worldwide, and he’s one of them.

Crowe is pursuing a doctoral degree at Boston University and will be researching and performing in Europe this summer.

He sings for Here & Now’s Sacha Pfeiffer in the studio, demonstrating his multi-octave range and hitting some gravity-defying notes.

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Book Reviews
9:07 am
Fri May 16, 2014

In Mona Simpson's 'Casebook,' A Holden Caulfield For Our Time

iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 9:18 am

When I was a kid, I spent a lot of summer days lying flat on my back in the front yard. I would stare up at the sky and think: "This is me, thinking." And then I'd think, "This is me, thinking about thinking." At that point, having made myself dizzy, I'd jump up and return to a less abstruse activity like riding my bike or tormenting my little sister.

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NPR Story
9:07 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Michael Pollan And The Battle For Healthy Food

Author, journalist and food activist says we shouldn't obsess over eating healthy, or break the bank doing so; rather, he says eating real food -- organic or conventional -- is the key to good health. (Jesse Costa/Here & Now)

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 12:31 pm

Food guru Michael Pollan has some rules about food, so it’s somewhat ironic that he thinks we’re obsessed with what we eat.

Pollan says we should relax about eating, and it doesn’t need to be expensive. Just eat real food — organic or conventional — rather than food made by large industrial food complexes.

He joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to talk about what we can do to eat better without stressing over everything we consume.

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Movie Reviews
9:07 am
Fri May 16, 2014

'Godzilla' Brings The Spectacle Without Obscuring The Big Guy's Dark Past

Godzilla. You know, from Godzilla.
Warner Bros. Pictures

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 9:50 am

This is a monster sold on a sigh. For all of the bombast, the buildings falling, and the brawling beasties, the moment when this Godzilla is most impressive, the moment he suddenly transcends his digital underpinnings and feels like a real presence, is one of his subtlest and quietest. During a lull in a battle among the skyscrapers of downtown San Francisco, the danger around him briefly subsides; his head droops momentarily, his body heaves ever so slightly downward, and he exhales quietly.

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Movie Reviews
9:06 am
Fri May 16, 2014

In 'Horses Of God,' A Sprawling Slum Breeds A Violent Act

Said El Alami and Achraf Afir in Horses Of God.
Kino Lorber

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 2:04 pm

Anyone seeking to establish an incubator for suicide bombers could hardly improve on Sidi Moumen, a slum on the fringe of Casablanca. As depicted in Horses of God, the neighborhood is a place of crushing poverty, rampant hostility and exceptionally limited options.

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The Two-Way
9:06 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Minnesota's Legislature OKs Medical Marijuana

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 4:59 pm

Minnesota has approved the sale and use of medical marijuana and Gov. Mark Dayton has said he will sign the legislation.

The state is poised to become the 22nd to legalize the drug for medical purposes.

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StoryCorps
9:06 am
Fri May 16, 2014

An Inmate Who Killed Another Rethinks His Own Past

Carlos Rocha, 40, is serving a 30-year sentence for possession of a weapon and murder.
Courtesy of the Danville Correctional Center

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 9:07 am

Carlos Rocha grew up in Chicago and became a gang member like his brothers. In 1998, he was arrested for weapons possession and sent to prison.

Right before he was to be released on bond, Carlos, now 40, got into a fight with another inmate and killed him, resulting in an additional 24 years behind bars.

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Shots - Health News
9:06 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Medicare Eases Restrictions On Pricey Hepatitis C Treatment

Walter Bianco's liver is severely damaged by hepatitis C, but insurers had refused to pay for the medications that could cure him.
Alexandra Olgin for NPR

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 10:27 am

Federal Medicare officials are embracing medical guidelines for the treatment of hepatitis C that could result in tens of thousands of older Americans getting access to expensive new drugs that can cure the deadly infection.

This policy change would pay for treatment with a combination of new, expensive drugs for patients who haven't responded to older treatment regimens and are approaching or have cirrhosis of the liver.

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