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The Two-Way
12:52 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

NBA Picks Dick Parsons As Interim CEO Of Los Angeles Clippers

Former Time Warner CEO Richard Parsons was named interim CEO for the LA Clippers.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 1:29 pm

The National Basketball Association has named a new interim CEO for the Los Angeles Clippers: It's Richard Parsons, the former Time Warner CEO who was also a chairman of Citigroup.

David Aldridge of NBA.com first reported on the appointment.

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All Tech Considered
12:37 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Not-So-Social Media: Why People Have Stopped Talking On Phones

There was a time when teens would spend hours on the phone gabbing with friends. Now, that's the stodgiest behavior imaginable.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 1:34 pm

Emma Wisniewski felt exposed. The New York-based actress had moments where she had to open up in a way that made her feel particularly vulnerable.

She had to talk on the phone. In front of people — her fellow actors and the audience.

"I've done several plays now that required talking on landlines, and what always strikes me is the relatively public nature of it," she says.

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The Two-Way
11:58 am
Fri May 9, 2014

Turkish Man On Dating Show Was Ax Murderer; He Also Killed Wife

Sefer Çalınak (right) and the host of Flash TV's Ne Çıkarsa Bahtına (The Luck of the Draw).
YouTube screen shot

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 2:24 pm

Think your love life is complicated?

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Shots - Health News
11:41 am
Fri May 9, 2014

Health Centers Hurt In States That Skipped Medicaid Expansion

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 5:18 am

More than 1 million patients who use federally funded community health centers will remain uninsured because they live in 24 states that chose not to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, according to a study released Friday by researchers at George Washington University.

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The Two-Way
11:40 am
Fri May 9, 2014

What Are The Most (And Least) Charitable U.S. States?

A map of the U.S. shows the states where residents were the most and least likely to say they had recently donated to charity.
Gallup

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 3:55 pm

There are only two U.S. states where at least 50 percent of residents say they've recently given either money or time to charity: Utah and Minnesota, according to a new Gallup poll. Nevada and Kentucky tied for the lowest rate of charitable giving.

The poll was conducted in the last six months of 2013, when at least 600 residents of each state were asked whether they had donated money to a charity or volunteered at an organization within the past month.

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NPR Story
11:39 am
Fri May 9, 2014

Video Chats With Mom Become Popular Web Series

Film director Joshua Seftel turned his FaceTime conversations with his mom Pat Seftel into a popular YouTube series called "My Mom On Movies." (Phillip Toledano)

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 7:34 am

In 2009, after filmmaker Joshua Seftel‘s father passed away, he and his sisters worried about staying in touch with their mom, so they bought her an iPad, and even though she was nervous about it at first, they convinced her to start using it.

First they sent emails back and forth, but soon Seftel and his mom started talking on FaceTime. Seftel says that around this time he remembered his mother said she had always wanted her own show. So he thought, why not?

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NPR Story
11:39 am
Fri May 9, 2014

Speaking Exchange: Brazilian Students Connect With Elderly Americans

A Brazilian student speaks with an American senior in this screenshot from a video about the program. (Screenshot)

A language school in Brazil is connecting its students to the elderly in Chicago, so the students can practice their English online. The promotional video for the “Speaking Exchange” program has gone viral because the kids and seniors are developing relationships.

[Youtube]

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NPR Story
11:39 am
Fri May 9, 2014

New Space Fence Could Prevent Real Life 'Gravity'

A computer image generated by NASA shows objects orbiting Earth, including those in geosynchronous orbit at a high altitude. The objects are not to scale. (NASA)

In the blockbuster film “Gravity,” astronauts became stranded, floating in orbit after “space junk” hit their mission at a heart-racing speed. While the film is more science fiction than fact, there are huge concerns about all the debris in the Earth’s orbit, and how that could affect satellite systems.

Sixty years of activity in space have resulted in about 500,000 pieces of space debris. The detritus ranges from left-over pieces of rockets to a glove that an astronaut dropped in 1965. All of that material has the potential to collide with the 1,100 satellites over the Earth.

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The Two-Way
10:51 am
Fri May 9, 2014

Ford Recalls Nearly 700,000 Vehicles To Fix Safety Problems

A Ford Motor assembly employee works on a 2013 Ford C-MAX Hybrid vehicle at the Michigan Assembly Plant in Wayne, Mich., on Nov. 8, 2012.
Rebecca Cook Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 4:14 pm

Ford has issued two recalls, each covering about 700,000 vehicles in North America.

The Associated Press reports:

"The first case covers 692,500 Escape SUVs and C-Max hybrids from the 2013 and 2014 model years.

"Ford says a software glitch can stop the side curtain air bags from inflating in some rollover crashes.

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The Two-Way
10:07 am
Fri May 9, 2014

Democrats Divided Over Participation In Benghazi Panel

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said Friday that negotiations were continuing with House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, over a Democratic role in the investigation into the circumstances surrounding the attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, in 2012.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 2:04 pm

Update at 1:03 p.m. Boehner Names GOP Members

House Speaker John Boehner on Friday named the Republican members of a committee that will investigate the 2012 Benghazi attacks: Reps. Jim Jordan of Ohio, Peter Roskam of Illinois, Martha Roby of Alabama, Susan Brooks of Indiana, Mike Pompeo of Kansas and Lynn Westmoreland of Georgia.

Boehner named Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., to head the panel on Thursday.

Our original post continues:

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Around the Nation
9:40 am
Fri May 9, 2014

Long After Lewinsky Scandal, Time To 'Bury The Blue Dress'?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Economy
9:39 am
Fri May 9, 2014

Controversy Over Spouses Of Tech-Saavy Immigrants Working In US

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We'd like to begin today's program by talking about immigration. This week the Obama administration announced plans to allow the spouses of some highly skilled, temporary immigrants to work in the United States. The administration hopes this change will help keep the best and brightest technology workers and scientists in this country. But there are critics on both sides. Some say the proposal is too narrow, others say their promise leaves fewer jobs for Americans.

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Health
9:39 am
Fri May 9, 2014

Midwifery: A Profession Of Passion, For Men Too

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Faith Matters
9:39 am
Fri May 9, 2014

Kidnappers In Nigeria Distorting Muslim Faith?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Now it's time for Faith Matters. That's the part of the program where we talk about faith, religion and spirituality. Over the past few weeks, we've talked a number of times about the hundreds of girls who were kidnapped from a school in northern Nigeria.

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NPR Story
9:34 am
Fri May 9, 2014

Zorro: America's First Superhero

The creator of Zorro based the character on several real life Spanish and Mexican outlaws who operated in the West. But the masked hero went on to influence America's superheroes — Batman for one.

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