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Shots - Health News
12:35 pm
Tue May 6, 2014

Most Fitness Apps Don't Use Proven Motivational Techniques

That lovely weather may be more motivating than the smartphone app.
Ferran Traité Soler iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 6:30 am

If you downloaded a fitness app and didn't become a workout ninja, it may be that the app lacked the scientifically tested motivational techniques that would help get you off the couch.

Instead, most popular fitness apps focus more on teaching you how to do the exercise, according to researchers at Penn State University who analyzed the 200 top apps.

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The Salt
11:46 am
Tue May 6, 2014

No More Bromine: Coke, Pepsi Drop Controversial Ingredient

A Change.org petition labeled brominated vegetable oil, used in sports drinks like Gatorade, a "fire retardant chemical."
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 6:54 am

Chalk up another win for citizen activists. Coke and Pepsi announced this week that they will no longer use brominated vegetable oil, or BVO, in their soft drinks.

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Shots - Health News
11:25 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Big Ambitions And Flawed Technology Tripped Up State Exchanges

President Obama made the case for health coverage at Faneuil Hall in Boston in late October, a few weeks after enrollment opened for health insurance sold on exchanges created under the Affordable Care Act.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Among the states that looked to expand health coverage to nearly all their citizens, Massachusetts was an early front-runner.

The state passed its own health care law back in 2006 mandating near-universal insurance coverage. That law became a model for federal action. And after the Affordable Care Act went through in 2010, Massachusetts had a head start in bringing health coverage to the uninsured.

Yet Massachusetts threw in the towel Tuesday on the problem-plagued online marketplace that was supposed to make health insurance shopping a snap.

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The Two-Way
11:17 am
Tue May 6, 2014

U.S. Sending Team To Help With Search For Abducted Nigerian Girls

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 5:39 pm

Nigeria has accepted a U.S. offer to send a team that could help in the search for 276 girls who were abducted from a school last month, the State Department said today.

State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said during her daily briefing that Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan had "welcomed" an offer for help that Secretary of State John Kerry made during a phone call today.

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The Two-Way
10:46 am
Tue May 6, 2014

A Faster Human: Are We Unique In Our Ability To Get Better?

English athlete Roger Bannister among a crowd at Oxford after becoming the first person in the world to run a mile in under 4 minutes (3:59.4).
Norman Potter Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 5:13 pm

Sixty years ago today, Roger Bannister accomplished something humans had only dreamed of decades earlier.

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The Fresh Air Interview
10:34 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Sam Baker: Finding Grace In The Wake Of Destruction

Sam Baker's new album is titled Say Grace.
C. Lawrence Courtesy of the artist

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The Two-Way
10:25 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Portland, Ore., Police Criticized Over 2013 Arrest Of Girl, 9

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 12:45 pm

The 9-year-old girl was wearing a bathing suit, a towel and handcuffs when she was taken away by police, with her mother looking on in shock. Now the arrest last year, over a fight at a Portland, Ore., youth club, is sparking criticism of the police after the girl's mother decided to go public.

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Parenting
10:20 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Foster Kids Can Be Torn Between Worlds On Mother's Day

Barbara Gerber and her son, Kayden
Stephanie Natale Courtesy Barbara Gerber

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 2:34 pm

Children across the country will be rolling out the breakfast trays and handmade cards for Mother's Day. But the holiday brings up mixed feelings for many foster mothers and their children.

"It can be really confusing for a child when there's Mother's Day and the child is supposed to celebrate their 'new mom,'" says Cris Beam, author of To The End of June: An Intimate Life of American Foster Care. "The child is still really attached, and it's a complicated holiday, and they need sometimes a new way to think about this other parent."

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Parallels
8:59 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Boko Haram's Local Fight Suddenly Gets International Scrutiny

A "wanted" poster for Boko Haram leader Abubakar Shekau in Baga village in northeastern Nigeria, the region where the radical Islamist group is based.
Tim Cocks Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 2:58 pm

The radical Islamist group Boko Haram isn't new. The group has been around for more than a decade and has waged a bloody insurgency in northeastern Nigeria for the past five years. But it has suddenly achieved international notoriety by kidnapping more than 200 schoolgirls who have now been missing for more than three weeks.

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The Protojournalist
8:54 am
Tue May 6, 2014

The Lost Village In New York City

Central Park swept over Seneca Village.
istockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 6:49 am

Smack in the center of New York City — in the confines of Central Park — there are ghostly vestiges of a 19th century neighborhood that once was vibrant and thriving but now is largely forgotten: Seneca Village.

It is considered by historians to be one of Manhattan's earliest communities of African-American property owners.

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Television
8:51 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Viewers Not Laughing About SNL Slavery Skit

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 10:38 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Finally today, we're switching gears now. You know that terrible feeling you get when you tell a joke that bombs? You think you're saying something hilarious or edgy or clever and crickets or gasps or worse, thousands of people lighting up Twitter to say just how unfunny or messed up you are.

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Behind Closed Doors
8:51 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Advice Columnist Couldn't Reveal His Secret ... Until Now

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 10:38 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we go behind closed doors. That's the part of the program where we talk about issues that people often keep private. Our guest today is used to dealing with sensitive issues. Steven Petrow is an advice and etiquette columnist who's just moved his column from the New York Times to the Washington Post.

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Your Money
8:51 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Is Bitcoin Where The Smart Money Is Now?

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 10:38 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now we'd like to turn to matters of personal finance. It turns out that money is more than what you have in your pocket. Today we want to take a look at the digital currency known as bitcoin.

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Obituary
8:19 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Tribal Treaty Rights Champion Billy Frank Jr. Dead At Age 83

Billy Frank Jr. at the Elwha Dam removal ceremony in 2011.
Katie Campbell KCTS

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 8:56 am

 Billy Frank Jr., a legendary champion of tribal treaty rights and Northwest salmon restoration, died Monday. He was 83 years old.

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Valley Fever
8:19 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Source Of Fungal Illness Discovered In Eastern Washington Soil

Coccidioides’ tube-shaped cells living in the soil can break into spores and go airborne.

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 8:57 am

A disease-causing fungus thought to be confined to the deserts of the U.S. Southwest has been discovered in soil samples from eastern Washington.

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