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After a 5 1/2-year trial, the former Bosnian Serb military commander blamed for orchestrating the murders of thousands of ethnic Muslims has learned his own fate.

Students of color in the Austin Independent School District aren’t doing as well academically as their white peers, so the district's Board of Trustees had a discussion earlier this month about how to address this "achievement gap."

The roast turkey and pecan pie may be the same as always, but growing numbers of families plan to add a tradition to their Thanksgiving holiday this week: a frank talk about their wishes for end-of-life care.

Paul Malley, president of Aging with Dignity, the agency behind Five Wishes, a popular living will template, says requests for the documents that guide decisions surrounding serious illness and death typically surge starting now.

A few days after Donald Trump was elected President, more than a hundred people packed into a church sanctuary in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. to hear a presentation about refugee resettlement in their town.

It didn't go well.

To the many mysteries swirling around the investigation of Russian election interference and the dismissal of FBI Director James Comey, add this one: Why is Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein continuing to supervise the investigation?

Rosenstein is the Justice Department official who pulled the trigger and named special counsel Robert Mueller to lead the probe in May, only days after President Trump fired Comey under questionable circumstances.

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The re-examination of sexual misconduct that has swept entertainment and media is now focused more tightly on Congress.

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'Job-Sharing' In Germany

14 hours ago

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All right. So Uber showed us that we can share cars. Airbnb did the same for homes. A startup in Berlin is taking it a step further. It wants to make job sharing a thing. NPR's Casey Herman shares the story.

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We're also tracking this news this morning. A U.S. Navy aircraft crashed off the coast of Japan. It was carrying 11 people. And we are now told that eight have been found alive.

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Looking At Bill Clinton's Legacy

14 hours ago

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For years, doctors have asked people about tobacco use and excessive drinking in the hopes that the answers could help lead people to cut down or quit.

But screening alone isn't usually sufficient to change behavior.

As opioid use hits record highs in the U.S., Christiana Care Health System in Delaware is starting to ask people about opioid use — and then go further.

In November 2016, Christiana Care staff started asking patients during routine visits and in the emergency room questions like these:

Updated at 10:15 a.m. ET

The Navy says eight people have been rescued and are "in good condition" after a propeller-driven C-2 Greyhound carrying 11 crew and passengers crashed in the Philippine Sea southeast of Okinawa, Japan.

"Search and rescue" for the remaining three people is still underway, the Navy says.

Satish and Arlene Palshikar live in a house in Southeast Portland that's coated with recycled bluish-white paint. Their boxy silver television is a 1990s vintage model they plucked from the curb.

"It said, 'Works fine,' so we said 'OK, we’ll take it,'" said Arlene Palshikar. "No packaging. Just load it in the car.”

They collect and reuse rainwater, compost their own food waste, and avoid plastic whenever possible. It takes two months to fill their trash can enough to put it out on the curb for pickup.

Marijuana may be legal in Washington and Oregon, but police continue to bust illegal marijuana operations that are not licensed by the state.

The latest numbers from the Washington State Patrol show that 89 illegal marijuana growing operations were shut down in Washington over the past year. Some were indoor grows, most were outdoor.

The Archive Project - Ta-Nehisi Coates

23 hours ago

 

“The theory is, in a lot of black folks’ circles, if we make ourselves respectable to them then maybe that will ameliorate the hatred. But they have it wrong. They hate you because you’re respectable; it’s the respectableness that inspires the hate, because you undercut by your very example.” -- Ta-Nehisi Coates

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U.S. District Court Judge Anna Brown sentenced defendant Darryl Thorn on Tuesday to a year and a half in federal prison followed by three years supervised release for his role in last year's occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge.

Following prison time, Brown ordered Thorn be released to a halfway house for up to 90 days.

Nearly 20,000 people have been removed from Washington’s Medicaid rolls for ineligibility. The purge happened after the state stepped up efforts to verify residency and income levels.


 

More than two days after a U.S. Border Patrol agent was killed and another seriously wounded while on patrol in West Texas, exactly what happened to the agents is still unclear.

Agent Rogelio Martinez, 36, died Sunday after sustaining severe head and bodily injuries. His partner, who hasn’t been named, is recovering from his injuries and is in intensive care, according to federal authorities.

Washington and Oregon are making contingency plans in case Congress doesn’t reauthorize the Children’s Health Insurance Program. CHIP is for low-income families that earn too much to qualify for Medicaid.

Updated at 9:44 a.m. ET Wednesday

Election Day results in two high-stakes races for the Virginia House of Delegates remain unresolved after claims of ballot mix ups that listed incorrect candidates in some districts.

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Brian Snyder/Reuters

As an environment reporter for The World, I spend a lot of time reporting on climate change as an international policy issue.

I spend less time thinking and learning about what it would actually look like to live in a country that’s weaned itself largely off carbon. Would everyone drive electric cars? Would we all have to live closer to where we work? How much of our energy would have to come from solar and wind power? Will nuclear energy have a resurgence?

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Ammar Awad/Reuters

When the topic of stronger gun control resurfaces in the US, often in the wake of a mass shooting, pro-gun activists and politicians frequently cite Israel as a counterexample.

There are a lot of guns in Israel, the argument goes, but it has less gun violence — so the problem in America is not guns, but something else.

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Mike Cassese/Reuters

Thomas Mapfumo is a music legend in Zimbabwe. 

So, when the so-called "Lion of Zimbabwe" released the album, "Corruption," in 1989, criticizing Robert Mugabe's authoritarian regime, his country's leaders turned against him. 

"A lot of people who were affiliated with this government were not happy with the song," he says. "They didn't want me to tell the people the truth about what was happening."

President Trump's charitable foundation received nearly $2.9 million in contributions in 2016, its latest federal tax filing shows — a million dollars more than it raised in the previous three years combined.

Three donors gave the Donald J. Trump Foundation more than 80 percent of its 2016 contributions. Million-dollar donations came from Las Vegas casino owner Phil Ruffin, a friend of Trump's, and Laura Perlmutter, a Trump family friend and big donor to Republican causes. Ivanka Trump gave $100,000. There's no record of any funds from Trump himself.

If you're recipe dependent, you may mumble, "Wait, what?" while paging through "The Myrtlewood Cookbook, Pacific Northwest Home Cooking" by Portlander Andrew Barton.

What's great: 100 nearly meditative recipes for soups, salads, sandwiches, dinners, pastas, accompaniments, breakfasts and sweets, organized by season. "Our book was truly made at my home, shot in real time over 18 months," said Barton, who worked with photographer Peter Schweitzer and a small team of collaborators.

The Department of Justice has opened a probe into the role of race in Harvard University's admissions policies and is threatening to sue unless Harvard turns over documents by a Dec. 1 deadline, according to correspondence obtained by NPR.

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